Streams

 

Mexico

The New Yorker: Out Loud

Francisco Goldman on the death of his wife

Monday, January 31, 2011

Francisco Goldman on the death of his wife.

Comment

The Takeaway

Acclaimed Novelist Carlos Fuentes on New Book, 'Destiny and Desire'

Monday, January 17, 2011

At 82 years old, Carlos Fuentes has worn many hats. He was the Mexican ambassador to France in the late ‘70s, but his passion has always been writing.  As a contemporary of Gabriel Garcia Marquez, Fuentes returns to magical realism in his latest novel, “Destiny and Desire,” in which he reflects on the state of modern Mexico and its endemic violence.

Comment

The Takeaway

Juarez Professor on a Bloody Year for Mexico

Friday, December 31, 2010

On this last day of 2010 we revisit the story taking place in Ciudad Juarez, in Mexico. It's a story that we've been sad to return to repeatedly, not just this last year, but over the last four years. Yesterday we heard reports of four more dead in the longstanding Mexican drug war between drug cartels and border troops. Gunmen believed to be linked to the cartels killed four police officers and a doctor in coordinated attacks around the nearby city of Monterrey.

Comments [1]

The Takeaway

El Paso Resident Skeptical of 2011

Friday, December 31, 2010

Life-long resident Jesus Ochoa has fond memories of growing up in El Paso, Texas. But he isn't optimistic about 2011; he says living on the border with Mexico is an increasingly scary existence, and is upset at the failure of President Obama and Congress to pass the so called "Dream Act." Ochoa joins us to talk about his hometown and its continuing challenges in the new year.  

Comments [1]

Features

New Yorkers Celebrate Arrival of La Antorcha de Guadalupana

Monday, December 13, 2010

Hand to hand, the torch was passed all the way from Mexico City to New York, finally ending its 72-day journey on Sunday at Saint Patrick's Cathedral amid hundreds of cheering families, folk dancers, and musicians.

Comment

The Takeaway

US Guns Used in Mexican Drug Crimes Growing

Monday, December 13, 2010

More and more guns used in drug-related crimes in Mexico are coming from U.S. dealers, according to a year-long investigation by The Washington Post. Many of the weapons are travelling south through the Texas city of Huston. But due to a law passed by Congress in 2003, the identities of the dealers selling the weapons are protected even as weapons they've sold show up at the scenes of violent crimes committed by drug cartels. For more on the story we're joined by a Pulitzer Prize-winning reporter who co-wrote today's investigative piece, Jame Grimaldi.  

Comments [3]

The Leonard Lopate Show

Ed Vulliamy on Amexica

Thursday, December 09, 2010

Ed Vulliamy talks about travelling along the Mexican-American border, from the Pacific coast to the Gulf of Mexico, from Tijuana to Matamoros, and witnessing corruption, all-out civil war, and beauty and resilience. In Amexica: War Along the Borderline, he describes how the narco gangs work: how people, weapons, and drugs are smuggled back and forth across the border, why the middle-class is fleeing Mexico, and he writes of the heroes, villains, and victims of the border frontier.

Comments [12]

The Takeaway

Underground Drug Tunnels Discovered Between Tijuana and San Diego

Thursday, December 09, 2010

In November, U.S. authorities discovered two underground tunnels intended for drug-trafficking between Tijuana and San Diego. The unusually sophisticated tunnels boasted a rail system and working lighting and ventilation. Some 30 tons of marijuana were seized in the tunnel by authorities last month. What do the tunnels look like first-hand? 

Comment

Features

New Yorkers Celebrate el Dia de los Muertos (Day of the Dead)

Friday, October 29, 2010

Although it’s a big holiday in parts of America, el Dia de los Muertos is still a rather quaint celebration in New York involving bright paper banners, flowers and candles, all reserved for the dead. Here's WNYC's Day of the Dead primer.

Comment

The Takeaway

Nortec Collective on Music and Borders

Wednesday, October 27, 2010

Nortec Collective is a band from Northern Mexico that’s known for pushing boundaries and blurring our notions of what constitutes borders.

Whether performing instrumentals, like “Tijuana Bass,” or singing electronic songs filled with mixed English and Spanish, they demonstrate that fences can do little to prevent the exchange of ideas and cultures, and may, in fact, do a lot to inspire them.

(Check out their new single, "I Count the Ways," after the jump.)

Comments [1]

The New Yorker: Out Loud

William Finnegan on a Tijuana police chief's campaign against corruption

Monday, October 11, 2010

William Finnegan on a Tijuana police chief's campaign against corruption.

Comment

The Brian Lehrer Show

Journalists Under Fire in Ciudad Juárez

Wednesday, September 22, 2010

Charles Bowden, journalist and author of Dreamland: The Way Out of Juarez and  Murder City: Ciudad Juárez and the Global Economy's New Killing Fieldsdiscusses the violence in Ciudad Juárez and the danger facing the journalists covering it.

Comments [24]

The Takeaway

Mexican Newspaper Asks Drug Cartels, 'What Do You Want From Us?'

Monday, September 20, 2010

"You are, at present, the de facto authorities in this city," reads an op-ed appealing to Chihuahua drug cartels in the Mexican newspaper El Diario. In recent weeks, two El Diario journalists have been killed by drug-related violence, most recently a 21 year old photographer. Now, the editors of the paper are publicly calling on the cartels to stop killing journalists.

 

Comment

The Takeaway

Along Mexico Border, Do Good Fences Make Good Neighbors?

Thursday, September 16, 2010

"Before I built a wall I'd ask to know
What I was walling in or walling out"

Robert Frost's poem "Mending Wall" might serve as a good start to the conversation over whether the huge fence the U.S.government is building to prevent illegal immigrants, terrorists and drug traffickers from entering the U.S. from Mexico is worth the effort and money.

Comments [5]

Features

NYC Mexicans Celebrate 200 Years of Independence

Wednesday, September 15, 2010

Mexico marks two hundred years of independence this week and to celebrate, a festival highlighting the cultural scene in Mexico City is bringing artists, musicians, writers and film makers to New York to show their stuff.

Comments [2]

The Takeaway

Reporters Targeted in Mexican Drug Violence

Wednesday, September 15, 2010

Earlier this summer, four Mexican journalists were kidnapped by gang members who demanded national attention on television. Since being released, one of the captives, a television cameraman, is now in the U.S. and is seeking asylum. Alejandro Hernandez Pacheco says his country can no longer protect him, or journalists like him, from the increasing danger that comes with reporting on crimes in Mexico's drug wars.

Comments [1]

The Takeaway

Mexico Celebrates 200th Year Amid Continued Drug Violence

Tuesday, September 14, 2010

Thursday morning marks the 200th anniversary of the start of The Mexican War for Independence, the conflict that ultimately led to the end of Spanish colonial rule over Mexico. Unfortunately, even as last-minute preparations for a massive commemorative celebration in the capital wrap up, persistent drug-related violence continues to temper optimism over Mexico’s stability.  

Comments [1]

Spinning on Air

Zarela's Musical Flavors of Mexico

Sunday, September 12, 2010

 

Zarela Martinez is passionate about sharing the Mexican culture she loves. As professional chef, restauranteur, and cookbook author she has increased American appreciation for the range and richness of Mexican cuisine. Growing up on a cattle ranch in Chihuahua, in northern Mexico, Zarela, her family and friends gathered each evening to sing songs. Host David Garland heard Zarela sing recently, and invited her to share her love of Mexican music on Spinning On Air in honor of the bicentennial of the Mexican War of Independence (Sept. 16) and the centennial anniversary of the Mexican Revolution. With harpist Silvio Solis and guitarist Francisco Espinola, Zarela cooks up the special flavors of Mexican song. 

 

Zarela Martinez is passionate about sharing the Mexican culture she loves. As professional chef, restauranteur, and cookbook author she has increased American appreciation for the range and richness of Mexican cuisine. Now she shares her love of Mexican music on Spinning On Air in honor of the bicentennial of the Mexican War of Independence and the centennial anniversary of the Mexican Revolution. Singing with harpist Silvio Solis and guitarist Francisco Espinola, Zarela cooks up the special flavors of Mexican song. 

 

 

Comments [17]

World Weekly with Gideon Rachman

Iraq, the Middle East, Nigeria and Mexico

Friday, September 03, 2010

Comment

The Takeaway

27 Killed in Mexican Drug Cartel Raid

Friday, September 03, 2010

Soldiers in Mexico killed 27 suspected cartel members in a raid and gun battle near the U.S. border. Mexican president, Felipe Calderon, insists that this fighting is crucial to ending the drug war in that country. "I'm completely conscious that during this last year, the problem of violence has worsened. This is fundamentally because there is an even bloodier war between organized criminal groups in their battle for territory, markets and routes," said Calderon.

Comment