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The Brian Lehrer Show

UN Speech Roundup: Mexico, Nigeria, Brazil

Thursday, September 22, 2011

Ken Ellingwood, correspondent for the LA Times' Mexico City bureau, discusses Mexican President Felipe Calderon's remarks at the UN yesterday; Jon Gambrell, chief correspondent in Lagos, Nigeria for The Associated Press, reacts to Nigerian President Goodluck Jonathan's speech; and Brian Winter, chief correspondent in Brazil for Thomson Reuters, discusses Brazilian president's Dilma Rousseff's opening address.

Did your head of state speak yesterday at the UN? What's your reaction to their speech? Let us know!

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The Takeaway

Police Begin to Pull Out of Ciudad Juárez

Thursday, September 01, 2011

Mexico's War on Drugs, which President Felipe Calderón declared in January of 2007, has already resulted in the deaths of some 40,000 Mexicans, according to the Congressional Research Service. The epicenter of the violence is Ciudad Juárez, a city in northern Mexico less than five miles from El Paso, Texas. Last year, over 4,500 federal police began patrolling there, replacing army units that had been stationed there previously. Today, those police will leave the city.

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The Takeaway

ATF's 'Fast and Furious' Dealt Another Blow

Wednesday, August 31, 2011

The Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives' controversial Fast and Furious program took another hit yesterday as Kenneth E. Melson, the acting director of the program’s Phoenix office, stepped down along with the U.S. Attorney in Arizona, Dennis K. Burke. The two were implicated in an ongoing investigation into the undercover operation that allegedly allowed for thousands of guns to get into the hands of Mexican drug cartels.

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The Brian Lehrer Show

Mexican Immigration Slows

Thursday, July 07, 2011

New York Times reporter, Damien Cave, talks about how immigration from Mexico is dropping as economic opportunity improves there, and Senior Demographer at the Pew Hisanic Center, Jeffrey S. Passel, talks about demographic trends in immigration from Mexico.

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The Takeaway

US and Mexico Reach Trucking Agreement

Thursday, July 07, 2011

Seventeen years after President Bill Clinton signed the North American Free Trade Agreement, the U.S. and Mexico have finally reached an agreement allowing truckers from both countries unrestricted access to America and Mexico's highways. As soon as the first Mexican truck is allowed to enter the U.S., Mexico will drop tariffs on more than $2 billion of U.S. goods. Harley Helms, a long-haul trucker with Crete Carrier, joins the program with his reaction to the agreement.

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The Takeaway

A Texas Execution Raises Red Flags in the International Community

Thursday, July 07, 2011

An execution scheduled in Texas today is making international headlines. Should Humberto Leal Garcia, Jr. die at the hands of the state, the U.S.'s diplomatic relations with Mexico could be adversely impacted, and possibly may violate the U.S.'s compliance with the U.N.’s Vienna Convention on Consular Relations. Garcia was convicted in 1994 of raping and killing a 16-year-old girl in Texas. He is a Mexican national and was not informed that he could access Mexican consular officials after his arrest. Garcia has been denied clemency from the state of Texas, but President Obama has asked that the Supreme Court weigh in on his case by today.

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The Leonard Lopate Show

Mexico and the Mexicans

Wednesday, June 22, 2011

Scholar and former foreign minister Jorge Castañeda explains some of the puzzling paradoxes of Mexico. Manana Forever? Mexico and the Mexicans is a portrait of a nation at a crossroads. He examines Mexico’s ambivalent and complicated relationship with the United States, the Mexicans tendency to resent foreigners even while they’ve made their country a popular tourist destination, and the future possibilities for Mexico.

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The Takeaway

US Guns Used By Mexican Drug Gangs

Wednesday, June 15, 2011

The United States may be behind the drug-related violence in Mexico, more than we think. According to a new Congressional report released yesterday, more than 70 percent of the guns detained in Mexico the past two years, originated in the U.S. On top of this, the ATF is under fire for reportedly supplying more than a 1,000 illegal firearms to gun traffickers in Mexico, in an operation called "Fast and Furious." They hoped selling the guns to "straw purchasers," would lead them to the crime organizations. Unfortunately, many of these guns were lost track of, and some were even tied to the shooting of an American border patrol officer. 

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The Takeaway

Mexico Marches Against Drug Violence: Will Their Protests Be Heard?

Thursday, June 09, 2011

Thousands of Mexicans have gathered for a 900-mile march to protest against the drug cartels and the violence that has gripped the country. Their caravan started last weekend in Cuernavaca, a resort and industrial city south of Mexico City. Mexican poet Javier Sicilia—whose son was killed by members of the Mexican drug cartel two months ago—is leading the march. It will conclude when the marchers cross the border from Ciadad-Juarez into El Paso, Texas.

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The Takeaway

Marching to End Drug Violence in Mexico

Friday, June 03, 2011

Two months ago 24-year-old Juan Francisco, along with six others, was killed by members of a Mexican drug cartel. Francisco’s father is Mexican poet Javier Sicilia. Juan Francisco was just one of the estimated 34,000 people killed in Mexico in drug-related violence in the last four years. Now Sicilia is leading a 900 mile march across Mexico visiting cities where people have been affected by drug violence.  Irene Caselli, will join them, she's reporting this story for the BBC.

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The Leonard Lopate Show

Backstory: Drug Violence in Monterrey Mexico

Thursday, June 02, 2011

Monterrey is Mexico's financial capital and was once considered the safest city in Latin America, that is, until the arrival of the drug war. We’ll speak with Human Rights Watch researcher Nik Steinberg about the influx of organized crime and drug related violence into the city.

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The Takeaway

Using Song, Mexican Teacher Protects Kindergarteners From Shoot-Out

Tuesday, May 31, 2011

In the city of Monterrey in Northern Mexico, teacher Martha Rivera led her kindergarteners in song as a shootout took place in the streets outside the classroom. She videotaped the entire episode because she is on the school safety committee and felt the need to record it. Like other teachers, she had been trained for this type of event.

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The Takeaway

President Obama Speaks on Immigration in El Paso

Tuesday, May 10, 2011

President Obama is headed to the border town of El Paso, Texas today and is scheduled to speak on the fate of the 11 million illegal immigrants living in the United States. It has been more than ten months since Obama gave his first big policy speech on immigration at the American University in Washington, where he stressed an administrative policy of border control and easing immigration proceedings for legal immigrants. But the Latino community is waiting to hear whether recent behind-the-scenes meetings have led to a more encompassing framework for federal immigration reform — one of Obama's campaign promises back in 2008.

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The Brian Lehrer Show

Drug Violence in Mexico

Thursday, April 14, 2011

Almost 35,000 people have been killed in the drug related violence in Mexico since 2006--120 bodies were found just since last week. We'll get an update on the violence and its origins from Viridiana Ríos, PhD candidate at the Department of Government at Harvard University, and co-author of the report Drug Violence in Mexico: Data and Analysis Through 2010.

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Know Your Neighbor

Lucia, The Frequent Flyer to Mexico

Monday, April 11, 2011

A lot of people travel for work. But for Bronx resident Lucia Martinez, that means flying back and forth to Mexico every single week. Her mission: To shuttle gifts between Mexican immigrants in New York to their family back home. "Some people come over to New York without having any family here," says twenty-one-year-old Martinez. "So these packages help them feel less lonely."

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The Takeaway

In Mexico, Protests Against Drug Violence

Thursday, April 07, 2011

More protests are scheduled to take place in Mexico. People are extremely angry about the 40,000 people who have been killed in drug-related violence and peaceful cities have begun to be afflicted by the drug wars. There are calls for President Calderone to step down because of the violence. For more on the protests is Franc Contreras, a freelance journalist in Mexico City.

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The Takeaway

US and El Salvador's Deep, Not Always Friendly Ties

Wednesday, March 23, 2011

El Salvador is the last stop on President Obama's three-nation tour of Latin America. Mr. Obama's stops in Brazil and Chile were largely overshadowed by events in Libya, but his reasons for visiting the strategically important South American nations were clear: with their galloping economies, Brazil and Chile are emerging as power players in the region and in the world. However, his reasons for visiting El Salvador are less obvious.

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The Takeaway

Mexican Truckers on American Roads

Friday, March 04, 2011

Mexican president, Felipe Calderon and President Obama have agreed to allow Mexican truckers on American roads. How do American truckers feel about this latest move? Harley Helms is a long-haul trucker, currently on the road between Kansas City and St. Louis. He says that this change will have a detrimental effect on American drivers, who are already dealing with high fuel prices. He is also concerned that Mexican truckers will work for much lower wages. Harley estimates that he will lose 15-20 percent of his personal business.

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Gallerina

At the Queens Museum: Luis Márquez In the World of Tomorrow

Tuesday, March 01, 2011

WNYC

In a curious exhibit at the Queens Museum of Art, curators Itala Schmelz and Ernesto Peñaloza of the National Automomous University in Mexico City have put together a highly intriguing visual chronicle of the 1939 World's Fair (and New York) as seen through the lens of one of Mexico's more unusual lensmen: Luis Márquez.

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The New Yorker: Out Loud

Francisco Goldman on the death of his wife

Monday, January 31, 2011

Francisco Goldman on the death of his wife.

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