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Mexico

The Brian Lehrer Show

Mexican Migration Has Ended

Thursday, April 26, 2012

Jeffrey S. Passel, senior demographer at the Pew Hispanic Center, talks about a new report: "Net Migration from Mexico Falls to Zero - and Perhaps Less," and what those findings mean on both sides of the border.

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The Takeaway

Undocumented and Abused at the Border

Tuesday, April 24, 2012

Each year, more than 25,000 undocumented immigrants are apprehended as they attempt to cross the border from Mexico to the United States. In most cases, we hear very few details about these apprehensions. But in one case, the details — which are especially gruesome — have become widely circulated.

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The Takeaway

Arizona's Immigrant Law Results in Upsurge of "Self-Deportation"

Tuesday, April 24, 2012

During the GOP Primaries, likely nominee Mitt Romney preached an immigration policy of "self-deportation". It just so happens that in the wake of the passage of SB 1070, Arizona's controversial immigration law, many of that state's undocumented immigrants are practicing self-deportation. But they're not necessarily going back to Mexico. Instead, many are crossing the border into surrounding states with more lenient immigration laws on the books. We're joined by Peter O'Dowd, News Director at KJZZ.

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The Takeaway

New York Times Accuses Walmart of Bribery Cover-Up

Monday, April 23, 2012

Walmart, the Arkansas-based retail giant, may bank its brand on family values, but in recent years, the company has faced criticism as its executives try to balance high moral standards with extremely rapid growth. A new investigation from our partner The New York Times investigates a potential corruption scandal, stemming from a network of bribery in the company's Mexico stores. Ben Heineman, senior fellow at Harvard Law School and expert on corporate governance, explains the aftermath for Walmart.

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WQXR Blog

New York Conductor Alondra de la Parra Takes Job in Mexico

Monday, April 23, 2012

Alondra de la Parra, the New York-born conductor who made a splash by forming her own orchestra while in her mid 20s, has a new job, as the artistic director of the Philharmonic Orchestra of Jalisco.

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Soundcheck

Rodrigo y Gabriela: In Studio

Wednesday, April 18, 2012

For their first collaboration with another group, Mexican guitar virtuosos Rodrigo y Gabriela reworked their own songs with a 13-piece orchestra from Havana known as C.U.B.A. We hear selections from the album that resulted, “Area 52,” when the duo joins us with a backing band to play live in our studio.

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The Brian Lehrer Show

U.S. Mexico Drug Violence

Wednesday, April 04, 2012

David Shirk director of the Trans-Border Institute (TBI) at the University of San Diego, and Viridiana Rios of Harvard University discuss the new report from TBI about drug violence in Mexico and discusses President Calderon's visit to the White House.

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On The Media

An Amendment to Protect Mexican Journalists

Friday, March 16, 2012

This week, the Mexican Senate approved a constitutional amendment that would give the federal government jurisdiction over murders of journalists, taking over that responsibility from local officials who are often either ineffective, corrupt, or both. Brooke speaks with Eugenio Herrera, the General Counsel for Groupo Reforma, the largest newspaper publisher in Mexico about the amendment. 

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On The Media

Mexico's El Diario Pleads with Drug Cartels

Friday, March 16, 2012

In 2010, after another staff journalist had been killed by the drug cartels, the Ciudad Juarez newspaper El Diario published a front page editorial – it’s title was ‘What Do You Want From Us?”  Brooke spoke with El Diario editor Gerardo Rodriguez about his plaintive, angry and very public question for the cartels.


Oddisee - All Along the River

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Studio 360

Miss Bala: The Beauty Queen and the Drug Lord

Friday, February 03, 2012

A new film called Miss Bala is an artful, riveting depiction of Mexico's drug war, and it isn’t the good guys-bad guys shoot-em-up you might expect. Instead, the story is told through the eyes of an innocent bystander: a beauty pageant contestant who finds herself in the wrong place at the ...

Video: A scene from Miss Bala

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The Takeaway

DEA Agents Launder Mexican Drug Money as Part of the War on Drugs

Monday, December 05, 2011

Each year, millions of dollars of Mexican drug money pass through the hands of American Drug Enforcement Administration officials. Undercover American narcotics agents launched the money laundering operation in order to trace the drug cartels. This is not the first instance of a U.S. governmental agency using illegal means to fight the war against drugs in Mexico. While the effectiveness of either program stopping the flow of drugs into the U.S. remains unclear, their impact on Mexican citizens is less ambiguous.

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The Leonard Lopate Show

Inside Mexico’s Criminal Insurgency

Monday, November 28, 2011

Journalist Ioan Grillo, who has spent a decade in Mexico reporting on the drug wars from the front lines, draws a portrait of Mexico's drug cartels and how they have radically transformed in the last decade. His book El Narco: Inside Mexico’s Criminal Insurgency includes testimonies from inside the cartels, firsthand dispatches, and analysis.

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The Takeaway

Ioan Grillo on Mexico's Violent Drug Industry

Monday, November 28, 2011

Since 2006, when President Felipe Calderón declared war on Mexico's drug cartels, 45,000 Mexicans across the republic have been disappeared, murdered, or mass-executed. Victims of this violence include journalists, over two thousand public officials, and bystanders. While drug-related activity was previously relegated to only a few Mexican states, the dramatic spread of violence — and its severity — is attributable to governmental policy north and south of the border.

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Transportation Nation

Weekend Video: The Running Man Crosswalk Countdown Timer in Guadalajara

Saturday, November 12, 2011


For your weekend enjoyment here's a variation on the crosswalk countdown timer from Guadalajara, Mexico, a more festive, kinder, gentler prod to pick up the pace.

This is what a crosswalk signal would look like if MC Hammer were the DOT commissioner.

Streetfilms Shortie - Crosswalk Running Man (Guadalajara) from Streetfilms on Vimeo.

Captured by Streetfilms. (h/t Greater City Providence)

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Transportation Nation

Lift of U.S. Mexico Trucking Ban Divides GOP

Thursday, November 03, 2011

butlerphotography/flickr

(Aswini Anburajan, Feet in Two Worlds) The Republican presidential candidates have been unusually quiet on President Barack Obama’s decision to lift the 17 year ban on Mexican commercial trucks entering the United States under the North American Free Trade Agreement, despite objections from Republican and Democratic congressmen and the powerful Teamsters Union.

The first truck crossed the border last week. The issue may be a non-issue in the presidential campaign as all candidates in the race claim support for free trade agreements. However allowing trucking between the countries and Mexican drivers to enter the United States touches on immigration, the fear of people entering the United States illegally and the threat some Americans, including those in unions, claim that immigration poses to American workers.

The emotions that the decision is invoking pits two key sections of the Republican party against each other – the pro-business movement, which sees a move like this as a cut in costs, and the hardliners who are advocating higher walls and more security around the border to limit any opportunity for people to enter the United States illegally.

(You can read the rest of the post at our sister site, It'sAFreeCountry.Org

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It's A Free Country ®

Lift of U.S.-Mexico Trucking Ban Divides GOP

Thursday, November 03, 2011

The emotions that the decision is invoking pits two key sections of the Republican party against each other – the pro-business movement which sees a move like this as a cut in costs and the hardliners who are advocating higher walls and more security around the border to limit any opportunity for people to enter the United States illegally.

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Transportation Nation

First Ever Mexican Truck Crosses Border Under NAFTA

Tuesday, October 25, 2011

Almost 20 years after the North American Free Trade Agreement promised an open flow of goods across the continent, the first Mexican truck was permitted to enter the U.S. inland under the agreement this week.

The AP reports the first rig to cross the Rio Grande heading north was a Freightliner truck hauling a steel drilling structure. The driver, Josue Cruz, "waved from the cab, flashed a thumbs-up and thundered toward the bridge" to Laredo, Texas.

The provision to permit hauling U.S.-bound goods in Mexican-inspected trucks was blocked from being fully implemented because of fears that rigs inspected and registered in Mexico would compromise the safety of American roads.

The cross border trucking issue has been a sticking point between the nations since shortly after the 1994 agreement was signed. Originally, Mexican trucks were supposed to have access to border areas by 1995, and the U.S. highway system by 2000. That never happened. There was considerable opposition from labor groups to all of NAFTA, including this provision which, opponents say, would eliminate U.S. trucking jobs. But the official concern was always stated as safety.

While Canadian trucks have free access to U.S. roads, Mexican trucks were viewed as a potential hazard because the inspection, maintenance and driver certification processes was  seen as too lax. Mexican trucks have been crossing the border into a buffer zone where they unload their haul into an American truck.

There was a short lived pilot program in 2007 that allowed some Mexican trucks across, but President Obama canceled it in 2009, sparking retaliatory tariff increases from Mexico permitted under NAFTA.

The Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration says this new plan is a pilot program as well. According to their website, only one company has been granted, permission for two drivers and one vehicle. Eleven companies are applying for certification. Mexico-based companies that pass will granted three years of access to the wide open American road. American trucks will be given reciprocal access south of the border.

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The Takeaway

US Has Network of Informants in Mexican Drug Cartels

Tuesday, October 25, 2011

In an exclusive story, The New York Times reports today that the United States has a network of highly placed informants in Mexican drug cartels, often operating without the knowledge of the Mexican government. The informants have been instrumental in capturing or killing a number of important traffickers. Eric Olson, senior associate at the Woodrow Wilson Center's Mexico Institute, comments on what this revelation means for U.S.-Mexican relations.

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The Takeaway

Extortion in Mexico Shuts Down Schools

Wednesday, September 28, 2011

Extortion has tripled in Mexico since 2004, and the latest victims are teachers in Acapulco, one of the country's biggest tourist spots. Gang members are plaguing teachers there with threats demanding they give over half their pay by October 1. Hundreds of schools have closed because of the threats, but thousands of teachers are not sitting quietly, and instead are taking to the streets in protest.

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On The Media

Death for Blogging

Friday, September 23, 2011

Last week the mutilated bodies of a man and a woman were found dangling from a pedestrian overpass in the Mexican boarder town of Nuevo Laredo, with notes explicitly warning that those posting the wrong things on the internet will share the same fate. As Drug cartels in Mexico turn their sights on blogs and twitter feeds, the mostly-anonymous social media may have an advantage that eludes mainstream journalism. Louis Nevaer of New America Media discusses the drug wars and the possibility of a newly empowered Mexican social body.

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