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Mexico

The Leonard Lopate Show

Aquifer Pollution

Thursday, January 31, 2013

ProPublica reporter Abrahm Lustgarden talks about Mexico City's plans to tap a mile-deep aquifer for drinking water, raising new questions about existing U.S. policy that allows water that’s deep underground to be intentionally polluted.

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The Takeaway

'Reportero' Tells the Story of Journalists Who Risk Their Lives in Mexico

Monday, January 07, 2013

The Committee to Protect Journalists estimates that 48 journalists have been killed or kidnapped in Mexico between 2006 and 2011. In a new point-of-view-style documentary airing on PBS stations tonight, filmmaker Bernardo Ruiz follows the story of a Mexican newspaper and its brave editorial team which is moving forward with its mission despite direct attacks on its own staff and reporters.

Comments [1]

State of the Re:Union

State of the Re:Union: Tucson AZ

Saturday, January 05, 2013

Tucson sits in the borderlands, the desert landscape where America and Mexico meet.  This place is crisscrossed by boundaries, visible and invisible—from the U.S. border wall that cuts the Sonoran desert in half, to live-wire political divides in Tucson itself.   In this episode, we tell stories about what happens when people cross borders, risking their lives and their reputations to take a chance on the other side.

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The Brian Lehrer Show

Mexico and the U.S. in Obama's Second Term

Wednesday, November 28, 2012

Shannon O'Neil, senior fellow for Latin America Studies at the Council on Foreign Relations, analyzes President-elect Enrique Peña Nieto of Mexico’s visit to the White House yesterday. What does Peña Nieto’s election mean for the US-Mexico relationship and what did he and the President discuss in their first tête-à-tête?

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On The Media

The Houston Chronicle Leaves Mexico

Friday, November 16, 2012

Texas' biggest daily newspaper, The Houston Chronicle, has just closed down its long-standing bureau in Mexico City. Brooke speaks to the former head of the bureau, Dudley Althaus, about what is lost when regional papers shut down their foreign bureaus, and the important relationship between Texas and Mexico.

Los Lobos - El Canelo

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On The Media

Mexico's Illuminating Information Laws

Friday, November 16, 2012

Ten years ago, Mexico passed some of the best freedom of information laws in the world. But while the laws are great on paper, their implementation has been problematic. Brooke travels to Mexico City to learn more about why Mexico's sunshine laws still struggle to illuminate information for the public.

Los Lobos - La Iguana

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The Brian Lehrer Show

30 Issues: America and the Americas

Thursday, October 18, 2012

30 Issues in 30 Days is our election year series on the important issues facing the country this election year. Today: U.S.-Mexican and U.S.-Latin American interactions and foreign policy issues close to home. Visit the 30 Issue home page for all the conversations.

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It's A Free Country ®

Did the ATF Walk Guns to Mexico in Fast & Furious?

Tuesday, July 03, 2012

On Tuesday's Brian Lehrer Show, reporter Katherine Eban broke down her breakthrough investigation into the root cause of the Fast and Furious "gun-walking" scandal.

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The Takeaway

What Do Mexican Politics Mean for American Border Towns?

Tuesday, July 03, 2012

When a PRI candidate emerged as the frontrunner in Mexico’s presidential elections this summer, a question emerged as central to his campaign: Would electing a candidate from the PRI, a party known for corruption and cooperation with drug lords, signal a step forward, or a return to the past?

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The Takeaway

Did the ATF Deliberately Walk Guns into Mexican Drug Cartels?

Monday, July 02, 2012

The title 'Fast and Furious' has come to mean more than the popular street-racing movie. It's now synonymous with a scandal that implicates the Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearm and Explosives (ATF) in a world of “rivalry, murder and political bloodlust." But following a six-month investigation, an article by Katherine Eban in Fortune revealed that many of the allegations brought by accusers against the ATF are unfounded and built on lies.

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The Takeaway

PRI's Peña Nieto Appears to Win Mexico's Presidential Election

Monday, July 02, 2012

After ruling Mexico for 71 years before being ousted in 2000, the Institutional Revolutionary Party, also known as the PRI, saw a remarkable comeback on Sunday when their candidate, Enrique Peña Nieto, won the presidential election. Peña Nieto was favored to win in the race against Andrés Manuel López Orador, the leftist candidate. 

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The Takeaway

Mexico Elections: Who is Enrique Peña Nieto?

Tuesday, June 26, 2012

In four days, Mexicans go to the polls to chose a new president, the vote being held against the background of a violent drugs war and a slowing economy. In this audio essay, Celeste takes a closer look at the frontrunner, Enrique Peña Nieto.

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The Takeaway

Politics and Voting in a Militarized Mexico

Monday, June 25, 2012

All this week, The Takeaway reports on the upcoming presidential elections in Mexico, a country trying to cope with a number of pressing problems. Peter O’Dowd, news director of KJZZ in Arizona, discusses the candidates and the situation on the ground. 

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The Leonard Lopate Show

"Reportero"

Thursday, June 21, 2012

Director Bernardo Ruiz talks about his documentary “Reportero,” which follows veteran reporter Sergio Haro and his colleagues at Zeta, a newspaper based in Tijuana, one of the most deadly places in the world to be a journalist. Since the paper’s founding in 1980, two of the paper’s editors have been murdered and the founder viciously attacked. Despite the attacks, the paper has continued its aggressive investigative reporting. “Reportero” will be shown as part of the Human Rights Watch Film Festival at the Film Society of Lincoln Center June 21-23.

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The Leonard Lopate Show

Backstory: Mexico's Presidential Elections

Thursday, June 21, 2012

Mexican voters will head to the polls on July 1. Lucia Newman, Latin America Editor for Al Jazeera English, talks about what’s at stake and how the influence of the drug cartels has shaped the campaign.

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The Brian Lehrer Show

Brooke Gladstone on Mexican Elections and the Media

Tuesday, June 12, 2012

On the Media host Brooke Gladstone reports from Mexico on that country's upcoming presidential elections, its campaign laws, and Yosoy132, the movement being called the Mexican Spring.

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The Takeaway

Mexican Presidential Candidates: Change is Needed to Stop Drug Wars

Monday, June 11, 2012

Could it be that the Mexican people have finally had enough with the drug wars in Mexico? Enough to scrap the current policy of pitting the Mexican army against the drug lords and cartels? Certainly the three candidates running for President seem ready to toss out what the incumbent Filipe Calderón has been doing for nearly five years. The three candidates running for president say they want a major shift in strategy, if not a total reversal.

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The Takeaway

Mexican Drug Cartel Violence Nearing the US

Monday, June 04, 2012

We hear stores almost daily now about violence among drug cartels in Mexico, but over the weekend some of that violence spilled over the border. Police in rural Arizona found a charred SUV with five bodies inside along a stretch of desert road commonly used as a smuggling route. Authorities haven't charged anyone for the crime, but all signs are pointing to the cartels.

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The Takeaway

Women Trafficked from Mexico to Queens

Thursday, May 24, 2012

Thousands of women are smuggled each year from Tenancingo, Mexico, to Queens, New York through an elaborate sex trafficking ring. The BBC's Laura Trevelyan followed the route and spoke with female victims, pimps and law enforcement officials along the way.

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Matters of Economy

Corruption That’s Nobody’s Fault

Friday, April 27, 2012

The New York Times recently reported that Wal-Mart’s expansion into Mexico has been accomplished with the help of extensive bribery. Times business columnist James B. Stewart considers the implications.

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