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Mexico

PRI's The World

Trapped in Texas: Tens of thousands of immigrants are stuck in the borderlands

Monday, August 11, 2014

Remember that movie with Tom Hanks when he was trapped in an airport without proper documentation? For tens of thousands of undocumented immigrants, they’re not trapped in an airport, they’re confined within a small swath of land in southeast Texas along the Mexican border.

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The Takeaway

Gov. Perry Deploys 1,000 Troops to the Border

Tuesday, July 22, 2014

Texas Governor Rick Perry announced plans to dispatch 1,000 National Guard troops to the Rio Grande Valley. The news comes amid the continued surge of child immigrants from Central America. In recent days, Perry has spoken about taking matters into his own hands if President Obama doesn’t act.

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FT Big Read

US immigration: life on the line

Friday, July 18, 2014

US immigration: life on the line

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Transportation Nation

'Las Bicicletas' Hit NYC Streets

Tuesday, July 01, 2014

Large metal bike sculptures will start popping up in New York City on Wednesday. It's a public art installation that first premiered in Mexico City — and the artist hopes it will encourage more people to take up riding.

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The Leonard Lopate Show

A Mexico City Chronicle

Monday, June 30, 2014

The changing politics and culture of one of the world’s most remarkable and often misunderstood cities—Mexico City.

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The Leonard Lopate Show

It's a Jungle Out There: Internet Lies, Mexico City, and Joan Rivers

Monday, June 30, 2014

Charles Seife explains why, when it comes to the Internet, you shouldn’t believe everything you read—and how to tell the difference between truth and fiction. Francisco Goldman talks about trying to make sense of Mexico City, one of the world’s largest metropolises. We’ll find out how many words in the English language were once considered linguistic mistakes, slang, or just plain wrong. And the one and only Joan Rivers takes us inside her everyday world and shares her thoughts on life, celebrities and pop culture.

Selected Shorts

Gomez Palacio

Friday, June 27, 2014

This reading by David Rakoff of Roberto Bolano’s “Gomez Palacio,” is part of the SELECTED SHORTS program “A Tribute to David Rakoff ” hosted by David Sedaris.

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Selected Shorts

Selected Shorts: A Tribute to David Rakoff

Friday, June 27, 2014

David Sedaris hosts a tribute to David Rakoff

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The Brian Lehrer Show

What Unaccompanied Minors Mean for Immigration Reform

Thursday, June 26, 2014

Children from Central America are risking their lives to cross the U.S.-Mexico border — alone. What are they running from? Who’s encouraging them? And how will this change United States policies? 

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The Takeaway

An Inside Look at Mexico's Drug War

Thursday, June 19, 2014

We're in close proximity to a raging drug war, yet most of us couldn't be more removed from the realities occurring just over the border.

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Soundcheck

Ministry Frontman Al Jourgensen; Speedy Ortiz Plays Live; Mexico's 'Narco Cultura'

Monday, June 16, 2014

In this episode: Ministry might have started off playing new wave and synth pop in the 1980s, but it evolved into one of the most important industrial rock bands of all time. Ministry's frontman Al Jourgensen has been there through it all, and tells it all in his memoir Ministry: The Lost Gospels According To Al Jourgensen. Jourgensen discusses his insane life and talks about what the future holds for the band.

And: There’s plenty to unpack in the wry, confessional lyrics of Speedy Ortiz -- the solo-moniker-turned rock band of singer and guitarist Sadie Dupuis. With lines like "Spent the summer on crutches and everybody teased / except for this one friend I almost forgot" (“No Below”), Dupuis lets us in, revealing her distinctively sharp point of view -- equal parts hilariously self-deprecating and brutally honest.

And: A narcocorrido is a popular type of Mexican song that glamorizes and celebrates outlaw drug traffickers. Those songs -- and the culture they celebrate -- are at the heart of Shaul Schwarz's recent film, Narco CulturaIn an interview with Soundcheck host John Schaefer, Schwarz talks about the burgeoning genre, its history, and the ongoing Mexican drug war. 

 

This is an encore edition of Soundcheck.

WNYC News

Seventy Years of Street Life in Latin America

Sunday, May 18, 2014

A new exhibit presents works by photographers from Argentina, Brazil, Chile, Colombia, Cuba, Mexico, Peru, and Venezuela taken between 1944 and 2013.

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The Takeaway

How We Invented Illegal Immigration

Thursday, May 15, 2014

Aviva Chomsky, author of "Undocumented: How Immigration Became Illegal," says even comprehensive reform can't fix all of our immigration problems. She argues that our immigration issues stem from the way we classify who comes into this country, and who is barred from entry.

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The Takeaway

Inside the Highly Organized World of Drug Cartels

Thursday, February 27, 2014

Saturday’s capture of the notorious drug lord El Chapo was hailed as a major victory in the war against the international drug trade. But the crime syndicate has a presence in as many as 50 countries. And it is run, in many ways, as efficiently and as well organized as a multi-national corporation. So with El Chapo out of the game, will Sinaloa even feel the loss? Mike Vigil, a former U.S. Drug Enforcement Agency agent, weighs in.

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Specials

Mexico Uncovered

Saturday, January 04, 2014

The U.S. and Mexico share deep personal, economic, geographic and cultural connections, but our understanding of Mexico is often limited by what we typically see in the media, a laundry list of stereotypes and generalizations. You probably think you know Mexico because a.) you’ve been on vacation there, b.) because we’re neighbors, or c.) you have family there. But in spite of our proximity to Mexico, it remains a mystery to many. Join host Daniel Hernandez as he introduces us to the Mexico you don’t know, using stories rich in sound, place and humanity.

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WNYC News

One NY Artist: Villalobos Brothers

Saturday, December 21, 2013

There are thousands of artists in New York City. Some are famous internationally. Others are scratching out a living while perfecting their craft. WNYC is bringing a few of them to the spotlight in their own voices. Here, the Villalobos Brothers. They are a trio of violinists and singer-songwriters from Veracruz, Mexico, now based in Marble Hill, in Upper Manhattan.

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Strangers

Alfredo Corchado: Midnight in Mexico

Friday, November 15, 2013

An immigrant boy receives an offer he can't refuse. - Get the full story here.

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The Leonard Lopate Show

China's Challenges; David Plante on London; Tom Barbash on Short Stories; Mexico and the Drug Wars

Tuesday, September 24, 2013

We’ll take a look at the challenges that stand in China’s path to global supremacy, including extreme gender disparity and an aging labor force. Novelist David Plante talks about the first volume of his memoirs, Becoming a Londoner, about his first 20 years in that city. Tom Barbash discusses his new collection of short stories called Stay Up with Me. And find out how Mexico became home to Latin America’s biggest drug cartels and the violence and corruption that came along with them.

The Leonard Lopate Show

The Mexican Druglords and their Godfathers

Tuesday, September 24, 2013

Journalist Anabel Hernandez describes how Mexico became a base for the mega-cartels of Latin America and one of the most violent places on the planet. Narcoland: The Mexican Druglords and their Godfathers takes readers to the front lines of the “war on drugs,” which has so far cost more than 60,000 lives in just six years and reveals the mind-boggling depth of corruption in Mexico’s government and business elite.

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The Takeaway

A Battle for Water When the Rio Grande Runs Low

Thursday, August 29, 2013

A 70-year-old treaty between the U.S. and Mexico is supposed to keep the waters of the Rio Grande River flowing between the bordering states. But in a time when the rains can longer be relied upon, Mexico has fallen behind on its part of the deal. Monica Ortiz Uribe, a senior field correspondent for Fronteras, went down to Chihuahua to find out more about this battle for water and shares her findings with The Takeaway.

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