Streams

 

Mental Health

The Takeaway

The Fine Line Between Humor and Mental Illness

Wednesday, August 13, 2014

Robin Williams has become today's symbol of tortured comedic genius - and now a new generation of comedians are plucking the depths of despair for material. 

Comments [1]

The Leonard Lopate Show

Our Delusional Brains

Monday, July 21, 2014

Are delusions just the symptom of a crossed wire in our brains, or could the world around us be contributing? In an age of constant surveillance and online sharing, perhaps it's not crazy to feel like you're in "The Truman Show."

Comments [8]

The Takeaway

Combating Alzheimer's With Music

Monday, July 21, 2014

Who do we become when we can no longer remember our own pasts? Could something as simple as music be a saving grace for the more than 5 million Americans suffering from Alzheimer's? 

Comments [3]

New Tech City

Treating Bipolar with a Microphone

Wednesday, July 16, 2014

Amber Smith is bipolar. Her mood swings are dangerous. But she's testing new technology that could spot trouble early by detecting patterns in the sound of her voice.

Comments [4]

The Leonard Lopate Show

Postpartum Depression and Maternal Mental Health

Friday, June 27, 2014

Postpartum depression is more varied than once thought and it affects a lot of mothers.

Comments [10]

WNYC News

Take This Apartment and Call Me in the Morning

Wednesday, June 04, 2014

There's no doubt Lissette Encarnacion needs her subsidized, supportive housing. But is her apartment a form of healthcare? And if so, who pays for it?

Comments [3]

The Takeaway

Taking on Trauma Through Music and Art

Tuesday, June 03, 2014

In his fourth studio album entitled "PTSD," Pharoahe Monch tells stories that represent painful experiences for him, but they have also made him a champion for people whose limitations and challenges have never made it into popular culture. 

Comments [2]

The Takeaway

Life After Captivity: What's Next for Bowe Bergdahl

Tuesday, June 03, 2014

Stephen Farrell, reporter for our partner The New York Times, knows firsthand what being held hostage by the Taliban can be like. He reflects on what newly-released American POW's recovery process will likely entail in the coming weeks and months.

Comments [2]

The Takeaway

VA Investigation: Delayed Care Is Rampant

Thursday, May 29, 2014

A new report on the VA by the Office of The Inspector General confirms that VA administrators manipulated medical waiting lists at one and possibly more hospitals. The report shows that that similar kinds of manipulation were “systemic throughout” the VA healthcare system.

Comments [2]

The Brian Lehrer Show

When Doctors and Patients Share Notes

Thursday, May 29, 2014

Lena Sun, health reporter at The Washington Post, discusses her story on a pilot program at a Boston hospital that allows mental health patients to read the notes their doctors are writing during therapy sessions. The program grew out of a national push for more access to health records for patients, but some patients and doctors worry that care will suffer.

 

Comments [11]

The Brian Lehrer Show

Life in State Care

Thursday, May 22, 2014

Ira Lustbader, associate director of Children's Rights, talks about Children's Rights' new campaign called "Fostering the Future," which will highlight the personal experiences of kids who have spent time in the foster care system. Michael Place, a former foster youth and founder of Mind the Gap, a liaison between mental health practitioners and foster children, gives his suggestions for how to improve the system.

Comments [8]

The Takeaway

Should College Material Come with a Trigger Warning?

Thursday, May 22, 2014

The growing practice of requesting “trigger warnings” on college course material that might be disturbing to students has caused a great deal of controversy. Why are trigger warnings such a hot-button topic and how should we address them?

Comments [20]

The Takeaway

Whistleblower Sheds Light on VA Neglect

Friday, May 16, 2014

A doctor who tried came forward about service delays for patients at risk of committing suicide at a VA facility in St. Louis was sanctioned by his employer, demoted, investigated, and told he was creating a hostile work environment.

Comment

The Brian Lehrer Show

Vets Come Home With "Moral Injuries" Too

Friday, April 04, 2014

Pulitzer Prize-winning military correspondent David Wood talks about his reporting on veterans and what part "moral injury" may have played in the recent shooting at Ft. Hood.

Comments [40]

The Takeaway

Inside PTSD and the Military Bureaucracy

Friday, April 04, 2014

Between 11 to 20 percent of veterans who served in Iraq and Afghanistan suffer from PTSD. Psychotherapist Marjorie Morrison knows these numbers well. She's spent a decade working to combat PTSD before it starts, but she's encountered levels of military bureaucracy along the way. 

Comments [2]

The Leonard Lopate Show

How Poverty Affects Mental Health

Monday, March 31, 2014

For the first part of this week’s installment of our series Strapped: A Look at Poverty in America, we’re finding out how poverty affects mental health. Epidemiologist Dr. Jane Costello examines the impact poverty has on mental health, especially among children. She tells us about her Great Smoky Mountains Study—a longitudinal study of more than 1,400 children in North Carolina—looking at who gets mental illness, who gets treatment, and how rising out of poverty improves the mental health of children and families. Dr. Costello is Associate Director for Research, Center for Child & Family Policy and Professor of Medical Psychology in the Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences at Duke University.

Comments [4]

The Leonard Lopate Show

The Father of the Sandy Hook Killer Searches for Answers

Monday, March 17, 2014

Although the killing 26 people at an elementary school remains incomprehensible, one journalist's conversations with a grieving father can give us insight into what went wrong.

Comments [21]

The Leonard Lopate Show

A Japanese War Crimes Suspect and an Unsolved Mystery from World War II

Thursday, February 13, 2014

In the wake of World War II, the Allied forces charged 28 Japanese men with crimes against humanity. Eric Jaffe tells the story of one of the accused, a civilian named Okawa Shumei. On the first day of the Tokyo trial, he made headlines around the world by slapping star defendant and wartime prime minister Tojo Hideki on the head. Had Okawa lost his sanity? Or was he faking madness to avoid a grim punishment? Jaffee tells the story in his book A Curious Madness

Comments [3]

New Tech City

Stop! Recharge Yourself with this One Minute Digital Detox

Thursday, January 23, 2014

WNYC

Feeling taxed by 2014 already? Promised yourself you'd stop being a slave to your phone? Take one short minute for this fun video guide to a digital detox. 

Comments [1]

The Leonard Lopate Show

Scott Stossel on Coping with a Fear of Cheese, Flying, and His Other Anxieties

Tuesday, January 14, 2014

Thirty-five years ago, anxiety did not exist as a diagnostic category, and today it is the most common form of officially classified mental illness. Scott Stossel talks about his own struggles with anxiety, and about the history of efforts by scientists, philosophers, and writers to understand the condition. In My Age of Anxiety , he reports on famous people who struggled with anxiety,  how it has afflicted generations of his own family, and the many psychotherapies, medications, and other treatments that have been developed to address it.

Comments [8]