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Memory

Radiolab

Animal Loses Head But Remembers Everything

Thursday, January 02, 2014

They're little flatworms that glide along riverbeds and perform miracles. Chop off their tails, they grow them back. Split them in half, they grow whole again. But chop off their heads, and not only do they grow new heads, but those new heads contain old memories! Whoa!

 

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Radiolab

What Chickadees Have That I Want. Badly

Monday, December 23, 2013

First I look in my right coat pocket. Nothing. Then my left. Nothing. Then my pants, right side — no. Then my pants, left side — yes! This is me at my front door, looking for my keys. Every day.

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The Brian Lehrer Show

Instagram Changes Your Memory

Friday, December 13, 2013

Can you really be in the moment - and be instagramming it? Emily Badger discusses her Atlantic Cities piece on how constantly recording events can change our perception of them.

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The Takeaway

The Woman Without A Memory, And What She Says About All of Us

Wednesday, November 06, 2013

Lonni Sue Johnson suffers from what's called profound amnesia. She can't form new memories or bring up old memories. But while her brain doesn't work the way it should, it does give us profound clues about how our brains work and can be improved. Michael Lemonick is a contributor to Time Magazine, where his piece about Johnson "The Muse of Memory" is published this week.

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The Brian Lehrer Show

Open Phones: An Oral History of Nostalgia

Friday, October 25, 2013

We open the phones to have you answer the simple question: What was better back in the day? It's an oral history of nostalgia, starring you. Tell us about what you think was better from a previous era, why you miss it, and whether you think it's better because of nostalgia, or because things were, empirically, better back in the day. Call 212-433-9692 or post below.

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The Brian Lehrer Show

Memories and Other Stories

Friday, March 29, 2013

Are we all "unreliable narrators" of our own life stories? Charles Fernyhough, psychologist and the author of Pieces of Light: How the New Science of Memory Illuminates the Stories We Tell About Our Paststalks about the act of remembering as an act of "narrative imagination" and what it means if memories are as much about the present as the past.

 

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The Brian Lehrer Show

Sick Leave Deal; Summer Camp Intel; Memory

Friday, March 29, 2013

There's a new paid sick leave deal in the NYC City Council. What's in it? What got left out? Plus: Psychologist Charles Fernyhough talks about his new book Pieces of Light: How the New Science of Memory Illuminates the Stories We Tell About Our Pasts; get your questions answered about sending your kids to summer camp; and the phones will be open for those high school seniors who will be the first in their families to go to college.

Meet Your Mind

Meet Your Mind: Memory and Forgetting

Sunday, March 10, 2013

Broadcast Times: Sunday, 7am on AM 820 and 9pm on 93.9FM

Do you think your memory is a record of what actually happened?  Chances are, it's not.  New scientific findings show that with every act of remembering , our brains produce new neural circuits....creating new memories. We explore the new science of memory and forgetting, how to build a memory palace, and how to erase a thought.

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The Leonard Lopate Show

André Aciman's Essays on Elsewhere

Wednesday, January 16, 2013

André Aciman talks about his new book of essays, Alibis: Essays on Elsewhere, about time, place, identity, art, and the power of memory.

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The Truth

Mirror Lake

Thursday, December 13, 2012

A couple goes in search of childhood memories. Performed by Ed Herbstman, Lauren Ashely Smith, and Louis Kornfeld. Story by Jonathan Mitchell with dialogue improvised by the actors. Produced and directed by Jonathan Mitchell.

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Radiolab

Krulwich Wonders: A Metaphor For Forgetting (That You Might Remember)

Wednesday, December 12, 2012

NPR

Alzheimer's is the disease that creeps in and slowly erases what you know until, eventually, there's no more to erase. How this happens is still a mystery, but this short animation by Po Chou Chi tries to make poetic sense of what goes on.

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Soundcheck

Treating Dementia with Music

Thursday, April 19, 2012

The new documentary "Alive Inside" chronicles the work of social worker Dan Cohen - whose organization, Music & Memory, aims to bring personalized digital music into the lives of the elderly and infirm. Joining us to discuss the role that music can play in elder care - particularly in the lives of dementia patients - is Dan Cohen, as well as Ann Wyatt, Residential Care Policy & Strategy Consultant for the Alzheimer's Association. 

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The Takeaway

Feedback Loop

Friday, February 24, 2012

WNYC

The ability to erase specific memories might soon be real. Dr. Todd Sacktor explained that this could eventually be used to treat disorders like PTSD.

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The Takeaway

The Ability to Erase Traumatic Memories Biologically

Wednesday, February 22, 2012

Whether through hours of rote memorization or mnemonic devices, there's no real "secret" behind making or keeping a memory. Conversely, the best way to forget something painful has been a source of endless cliche and conjecture — until now. New developments in the understanding of the brain have made it possible to help trauma patients erase specific memories. When a memory is formed, new linkages are held together by PKM-zeta. To undo these connections, the enzyme only needs to be blocked.

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WQXR Blog

How Memories Linger Through Music and Food

Tuesday, December 20, 2011

WQXR's Kerry Nolan asks why holiday traditions -- the nostalgia a piece of music brings, the aroma of a roasting turkey -- propel us to another time and place.

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Studio 360

Making Memories with a Microchip

Friday, November 04, 2011

Ted Berger is trying to build a microchip that can remember things for us. He teaches biomedical engineering at the University of Southern California, and his goal is to create a device that can take over for the hippocampus of the brain, translating thoughts into long-term memories. ...

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The Leonard Lopate Show

Google and Memory

Monday, August 01, 2011

Columbia University psychologist Betsy Sparrow discusses her research into how search engines affect our memory and are changing the way we remember information. Her paper in Science, “Google Effects on Memory: Cognitive Consequences of Having Information at Our Fingertips” is believed to be the first research of its kind into the impact of search engines on human memory organization.

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The Takeaway

Report: Brain Implant Could Restore Memory Loss

Friday, June 17, 2011

According to a new report, scientists have come one step closer in the development of neuroprosthetics that may help restore memory loss. A brain implant, tested in rats, successfully restored lost memories and strengthened old ones. Its use in humans will require far more research. Benedict Carey, science reporter for The New York Times, explains the findings.

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The Brian Lehrer Show

The Memory Industry

Thursday, May 05, 2011

Lawrence Weschler, director of the New York Institute for the Humanities at NYU,  Ian Buruma, frequent contributor to The New York Review of Books and the Henry R. Luce Professor at Bard, and Kanan Makiya, professor of Middle East studies at Brandeis University, take a critical look at our urge to commemorate.  All three will participate in the all-day symposium "Second Thoughts on the Memory Industry" Saturday, May 7th at NYU.

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The Leonard Lopate Show

The Memory Palaces

Wednesday, March 09, 2011

In 2006, science journalist Joshua Foer was crowned the United States Memory Champion in the "speed cards" event by memorizing a deck of 52 cards in 1 minute and 40 seconds. In his book, Moonwalking with Einstein, he recounts his journey to the top and in the process reveals the topsy-turvy world of professional memorizers.

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