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Memoir

The Leonard Lopate Show

David Dinkins on Governing the City

Tuesday, September 17, 2013

Former New York City Mayor David Dinkins talks about his memoir, A Mayor’s Life: Governing New York’s Gorgeous Mosaic. Dinkins, the son of a barber and a domestic worker, grew up in Harlem and Trenton and became the 106th mayor of New York City, in office from 1990 to 1993.

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The Leonard Lopate Show

Egypt's Crisis; Samantha Geimer on Roman Polanski; "After Tiller"; David Dinkins

Tuesday, September 17, 2013

Fewer than three years after the overthrow of Hosni Mubarak, Egypt’s politics remain in disarray. Martin Smith looks back at what’s happened and suggests what might be next. Samantha Geimer describes being the young woman in the sexual assault case involving Roman Polanski. We’ll look at what’s happened to the doctors who’ve continued to perform late-term abortions in the US in the wake of the assassination of Dr. George Tiller. Former mayor David Dinkins on his life, his time at City Hall—and his take on this year’s race for mayor.

The Leonard Lopate Show

Living in the Shadow of Roman Polanski

Tuesday, September 17, 2013

Samantha Geimer reflects on her experience at the center of the infamous Roman Polanski sexual assault case. In The Girl: A Life in the Shadow of Roman Polanski, she breaks her 35-year silence to tell her story and reflect on the lifelong repercussions.

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The Leonard Lopate Show

Billy Crystal

Wednesday, September 11, 2013

Billy Crystal talks to Leonard Lopate about the most powerful and memorable moments of his life and career, from entertaining his relatives as a kid in Long Beach, Long Island, to doing stand-up in the Village to "Saturday Night Live," "When Harry Met Sally," and hosting the Academy Awards.

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The Leonard Lopate Show

One Doctor

Monday, September 09, 2013

Dr. Brendan Reilly discusses dealing with daunting challenges of caring his patients at a renowned teaching hospital while also caring for his 90-year-old parents He  looks at the ways medicine has changed during his career, for both better and worse. His book One Doctor: Close Calls, Cold Cases, and the Mysteries of Medicine explores a fragmented, depersonal­ized, business-driven health-care system where real caring is hard to find.

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The Leonard Lopate Show

My Brother My Sister: A Story of a Transformation

Monday, September 09, 2013

Film critic Molly Haskell explores the controversial subject of gender reassignment and transsexuals from both a personal and a social perspective. Her book My Brother My Sister: A Story of a Transformation is about her own brother’s decision to become a woman and chronicles his transformation into Ellen through a series of psychological evaluations, grueling surgeries, drug regimens, and fashion lessons.

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The Leonard Lopate Show

A Pilgrimage Through Alzheimer's

Friday, September 06, 2013

Poet Jeanne Murray Walker talks about her mother's long passage into dementia. In The Geography of Memory explores parental love, grief, and the unexpected consolation of memory. Her mother's memory, which more and more dwells in the distant past, illuminates Walker's own childhood, and helps her rediscover and understand her own past.

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The Leonard Lopate Show

A House in Greece

Thursday, September 05, 2013

Christian Brechneff tells about first traveling to the Greek island of Sifnos in 1972, when he was a 21-year-old painter searching for artistic inspiration and a quiet place to work. On Sifnos, he found a muse, a subject to paint, and a sanctuary for more than 30 years. In The Greek House, Brechneff writes about the island, its residents, and the house he bought in a hilltop farm village.

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The Leonard Lopate Show

Love and Separation in WWII Hungary

Wednesday, September 04, 2013

Marianne Szegedy-Maszak tells a wartime love story about her parents, Hanna and Aladár, who met and fell in love in Budapest in 1940. He was sent to Dachau, and she and her family were forced into hiding when the Germans invaded Hungary and later fled to Portugal. They were reunited and were at last married in a devastated Budapest.  I Kiss Your Hands Many Times includes her parents letters and tells of the complicated relationship Hungary had with its Jewish population and with the rest of the world.

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The Leonard Lopate Show

The Book of My Lives, by Aleksandar Hemon

Monday, September 02, 2013

Aleksandar Hemon talks about his first book of nonfiction, The Book of My Lives, about growing up in Sarajevo, moving to Chicago just as war broke out in Sarajevo, leaving him no way to return home, and about starting a new life and family in this new city. He writes of his love of two different cities, the bonds of family, the joys of soccer, and the feelings of displacement.

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The Leonard Lopate Show

Public Defenders; Aleksandar Hemon; Typhoid Mary; Dr. Robert Lustig on Sugar, Fat, and Obesity

Monday, September 02, 2013

Happy Labor Day! We're re-airing some favorite recent interviews for the holiday. We’ll look at the current status of public defenders and the legacy of the Supreme Court decision Gideon v. Wainwright. Aleksandar Hemon talks about growing up in Sarajevo and watching its destruction from Chicago during the Balkan War. Mary Beth Keane discusses her new novel about Typhoid Mary, called Fever. Dr. Robert Lustig explains how the massive amount of sugar we’re consuming has changed our brain chemistry, affecting what—and how much—we eat.

The Leonard Lopate Show

Mary Williams, Jane Fonda's Adopted Daughter

Friday, August 30, 2013

Mary Williams talks about being born into the Black Panther movement, being raised amid violence and near-poverty, and being adopted as a teenager by Jane Fonda. Her memoir The Lost Daughter is a chronicle of her transformed life, her time working with the Lost Boys of Sudan, and reconnecting with her biological family in Oakland.

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The Leonard Lopate Show

Adventures in the South Pacific

Thursday, August 29, 2013

J. Maarten Troost recounts his adventures in the South Pacific, following in the footsteps of Robert Louis Stevenson to the Marquesas, the Tuamotus, Tahiti, the Gilberts, and Samoa. His book Headhunters on My Doorstep: A True Treasure Island Ghost Story  chronicles his journey and his recovery from alcoholism.

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The Leonard Lopate Show

Tom Shadyac's Life's Operating Manual

Tuesday, August 27, 2013

Tom Shadyac, the director behind the hit movies "Ace Venture: Pet Detective"; "The Nutty Professor"; "Liar, Liar"; "Patch Adams"; and "Bruce Almighty," talks about how a brush with death made him change the way he sees the world. His book Life’s Operating Manual: With the Fear and Truth Dialogues is s a series of essays and dialogues that look at the way we should live our lives.

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The Leonard Lopate Show

Life in the Big Apple Circus

Monday, August 26, 2013

Paul Binder, founder of the Big Apple Circus, discusses the uncommon life of circus artists, their animal partners. His memoir Never Quote the Weather to a Sea Lion looks at the weird and the workaday, the curious and the commonplace, the exhilaration and the exhaustion of life in the circus.

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The Leonard Lopate Show

Peter von Ziegesar's Looking Glass Brother

Monday, August 19, 2013

Peter von Ziegesar discusses his homeless and schizophrenic stepbrother, who he came to take care of. The Looking Glass Brother is about growing up among Long Island’s gilded age families and tells the story of how his stepbrother, Little Peter, came into his life.

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The Leonard Lopate Show

Rebuilding at Ground Zero; Peter von Ziegasar's Memoir; "Short Term 12"; "The Butler"

Monday, August 19, 2013

Urban anthropologist Elizabeth Greenspan talks about the tension between commerce and commemoration at Ground Zero. Peter von Ziegesar talks about growing up among Long Island’s Gilded Age families and becoming the keeper of his homeless, schizophrenic step-brother. Then, the director and the star of the film “Short Term 12,” about the employees of a facility for at-risk teens. And director Lee Daniels and screenwriter Danny Strong discuss their new film, “Lee Daniels’ The Butler,” about a black man who worked at the White House over the course of eight administrations, covering much of the civil rights era.

The Leonard Lopate Show

A Psychiatrist’s Encounters with the Mind in Crisis

Monday, August 05, 2013

Psychiatrist Christine Montross discusses the gripping patient encounters that have challenged and deepened her practice. In Falling into the Fire: A Psychiatrist’s Encounters with the Mind in Crisis, she looks at the grave human costs of mental illness and the challenges of diagnosis and treatment, and she confronts the larger question of psychiatry: What is to be done when a patient’s experiences cannot be accounted for, or helped, by what contemporary medicine knows about the brain?

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The Leonard Lopate Show

The Accidental Education of an Unintentional Director: Jack O'Brien

Thursday, August 01, 2013

Director Jack O’Brien talks about the history of American regional theater and how he became a director. In Jack Be Nimble: The Accidental Education of an Unintentional Director he explains that he didn’t intend to become a director, or to direct some of the most brilliant—and sometimes maddening—personalities of the age, but that’s what unexpectedly happened.

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The Leonard Lopate Show

Guest Picks: Richard Russo

Tuesday, July 30, 2013

Novelist Richard Russo was on the Leonard Lopate Show recently to talk about his memoir, Elsewhere. The Pulitzer Prize-winning writer also told us what 

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