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Medical

The Takeaway

A Push to Legalize Medical Marijuana Nationwide

Monday, March 16, 2015

According to the DEA, marijuana is one of the "most dangerous drugs." But a new Senate bill would change that perception and help thousands of people who rely on it for medical reasons.

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News

Talking About Cancer, Then and Now

Tuesday, February 10, 2015

WNYC
In the past, doctors suggested that perhaps their patients should not be told they have cancer.

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The Takeaway

America's Next Debt Crisis: Medical Costs

Wednesday, October 08, 2014

With the pace of medical costs on track to outpace real GDP and wage growth, a real medical debt crisis appears to be looming ahead.

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WNYC News

Doctors as Marketers

Monday, March 11, 2013

WNYC

For the past three years, ProPublica reporters Tracy Weber and Charles Ornstein have been investigating the sometimes cozy relationship between drug companies and doctors. Their reporting has revealed that some doctors receive thousands of dollars a year promoting pharmaceutical products in speeches all over the country. 

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Freakonomics Radio

Freakonomics Radio: Legacy of a Jerk

Wednesday, December 12, 2012

Dates and times for this program: Wednesdays: 8pm on 93.9FM; Saturdays: 6am on 93.9FM and NJPR, 2pm on AM820 and 4pm on 93.9FM; Sundays: 8pm on AM820 and NJPR

Since the beginning of civilization, we’ve thought that human waste was worthless at best and quite often dangerous. What if it turns out we were wrong? In this episode of Freakonomics Radio, Stephen Dubner explores the power of poop, focusing on an experimental procedure called the fecal transplant. A sort of combination of organ transplant and blood transfusion (one doctor calls it a “transpoosion”), fecal transplants may present a viable way to treat not only intestinal problems but also obesity and a number of neurological disorders.  We’ll talk to two doctors at the vanguard of this procedure and a patient who says it changed his life.

Also: we’ve all heard our share of poignant and loving eulogies. But what if the deceased was (gulp) a real jerk? Ancient wisdom tells us not to speak ill of the dead, but in this very chatty age, which includes online obituaries, what happens to a person’s reputation once they’re no longer around to defend themselves? Stephen Dubner speaks with Steve Jobs biographer Walter Isaacson about the Apple CEO’s well-known proclivity toward jerkitude, and we offer a radical reassessment of baseball’s biggest jerk, Ty Cobb.

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Studio 360

Elementary, Dr. House

Friday, December 23, 2011

For eight seasons, House, M.D. has been diagnosing patients with the same reason, deduction, and flair that Holmes relied upon to solve crimes. And that's no accident: the show's creator, David Shore, tells Kurt that his series was originally conceived as a police ...

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The Takeaway

New Report Ranks America's Best Hospitals

Thursday, September 15, 2011

A new report ranks America's 405 best hospitals based on their quality of treatment for heart attacks, pneumonia, and other critical ailments. Some of the nation's leading health care providers are not on the list. Dr. Mark Chassin, president of the Joint Commission, the hospital certification organization that conducted the study, said, "We recognize that improvement has been happening across the country on these measures, but there are some hospitals that have achieved extraordinary levels of performance."

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The Takeaway

Pre-Natal Testing and Medical Assumptions

Wednesday, September 22, 2010

A lot of you responded to our conversation Monday about whether or not to go through with pre-natal testing for Down syndrome. One response in particular stood out: mother-to-be Jocelyn commented on our website that her fetus had tested positive for Down syndrome, and she planned to continue the pregnancy. Some of her caregivers, however, had assumed that she would terminate her pregnancy. To respond to Jocelyn's comment, we have Dr. Andrea Price, OB/GYN at the Women's Health Alliance of New Jersey.

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The Takeaway

Rate of Caesarian Sections Steadily Increasing

Wednesday, September 01, 2010

A new study shows that Caesarian sections account for about 1/3 of births in the U.S. And that number is expected to rise. Is the C-Section becoming the new natural and safe way to give birth? We want to hear from you: what's so natural about "natural" birth, anyway?

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The Takeaway

Is It Worth Knowing Alzheimer's is Coming if There's Nothing You Can Do About It?

Thursday, August 19, 2010

We're following a new development about research into Alzheimer's treatment and prevention. On Tuesday, drug manufacturer Eli Lilly stopped two late-stage clinical trials of a treatment after researchers found an experimental drug was actually making Alzheimer’s symptoms worse. The news is just one more setback in a long series of setbacks for attempts to cure or prevent the deadly disease. 

However, there was some good news recently: determining who will get Alzheimer's. Researchers reported a few weeks ago that a spinal test can predict — with 100 percent accuracy — whether people who are experiencing severe memory loss will get the disease. However, there is nothing medically that can be done, even if you know it's coming.

We’re asking, is it better to know if you're going to get Alzheimer's, or is it easier to stay in the dark? Do you have a relative with Alzheimer's? What would you have done differently if you'd had known it was coming?

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The Takeaway

Did Lou Gehrig Have Lou Gehrig's Disease?

Wednesday, August 18, 2010

For 71 years, Lou Gehrig has been the face of Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis, or ALS, now most commonly known as "Lou Gehrig’s disease."

After getting the diagnosis of a disease that would quickly rob him of his muscle strength and control, Gehrig retired from baseball. At a ceremony honoring him at Yankee Stadium on July 4, 1939, his voice full of emotion, he said, "Today I consider myself the luckiest man on the face of the Earth. That I might have been given a bad break, but I’ve got an awful lot to live for. Thank you." He died just two years later of the disease that now bears his name.

Now new research suggests that there is a possibility Lou Gehrig may not have had "Lou Gehrig’s disease," but perhaps something closely related.  

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The Takeaway

One Med School, Hold the Pre-Med

Thursday, August 05, 2010

For more than 50 years, students who want to be doctors have dreaded two things above all else: organic chemistry and the Medical College Admissions Test – better known as the MCAT.

But there is one program out there that allows students to skip both of these prerequisites, though it’s been a pretty well-kept secret. The Mt. Sinai School of Medicine in New York City admits a quarter of its class without the traditional pre-med background.

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The Takeaway

New Recommendation: Allow Kids with Head Lice in School

Monday, July 26, 2010

Today, the American Academy of Pediatrics is releasing a new clinical report suggesting that parents let their head lice infested children stay in school.

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The Takeaway

The Push to Move Abortion Out of the Clinic, Into the Hospital, and Back Into Mainstream Medicine

Friday, July 16, 2010

In an article in this weekend's New York Times Magazine, contributor Emily Bazelon profiles a group she calls "The New Abortion Providers," young doctors who are attempting to move abortion out of clinics and back into hospitals.

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The Takeaway

Should Nurse Practitioners Be Given More Authority?

Thursday, April 15, 2010

The nation is facing a shortage of primary care doctors, and to fill that gap many states are proposing to expand the role of nurse practitioners to allow them to prescribe medication, practice without a doctor's supervision, and even be called doctors if they have a doctorate. 

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WNYC News

Cracking Your Knuckles: Annoying But Doesn't Cause Arthritis

Friday, August 14, 2009

hands

Should you wait an hour after eating before you jump in the pool? Do you lose most of your body heat through your head? Dr. Aaron Carroll is the co-author of Don't Swallow Your Gum! Myths, Half-Truths, and Outright Lies ...

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