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Mathematics

Schoolbook

Anxiety Attack: Conquering the Fear of Math

Thursday, March 07, 2013

Two professors say we've got to stop sending messages to young children — especially girls — that math is something to fear. Humans are actually hardwired to think mathematically, they say. Hear The Takeaway segment on the new Math Museum, and math anxiety.

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The Takeaway

Can a Math Museum Remedy 'Math Anxiety'?

Thursday, March 07, 2013

It may not surprise you to learn that American students dread math. But it might surprise you to learn just how young students are when math anxiety kicks in. New research from New York University suggests students start fearing math as early as first grade.  Dr. Rose Vukovic is a professor of teaching and learning at NYU's Steinhardt School of Culture, Education, and Human Development where she's studying this problem.

 

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Schoolbook

Second Stanford Report Finds Gains for NYC Charters

Wednesday, February 20, 2013

Three years after releasing a report finding students at New York City charters schools perform better than their peers at traditional schools, a research center at Stanford University reached the same conclusions and gave high marks, especially, to gains made in mathematics.

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Schoolbook

Love, Betrayal, Calculus: All on the "Math Warriors" Web Series

Monday, January 28, 2013

There are plenty of film and TV productions shot in the 5 boroughs, but only so many that deal with complex mathematical equations or the Monty Hall probability puzzle.

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Schoolbook

Competition Underway for Best Math Apps

Monday, January 07, 2013

The city has launched a challenge to its high-tech sector: help develop programs that engage middle schoolers in math lessons. The competition runs through April; it's being done in coordination with the iZone program.

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The Takeaway

All Calculators and No Brains: The Pros and Cons to High School Algebra

Tuesday, July 31, 2012

In his recent editorial for our partner the New York Times, professor Andrew Hacker asks “is Algebra necessary?” The millions of high school students and college freshmen taking mandatory mathematics, he argues, aren’t actually learning much aside from tapping those calculators.

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On Being

Janna Levin — Mathematics, Purpose, and Truth [remix]

Thursday, May 31, 2012

With physicist Janna Levin, we explore echoes between mathematics and great existential questions -- the nature of truth, free will, and how science informs the meaning of life.

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On Being

[Unedited] Janna Levin with Krista Tippett

Thursday, May 31, 2012

With physicist Janna Levin, we explore echoes between mathematics and great existential questions -- the nature of truth, free will, and how science informs the meaning of life.

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The Takeaway

Racism Is Crippling African-American Advances in Mathematics

Wednesday, April 18, 2012

In a column that quickly got him fired from his post at National Review, John Derbyshire offered some parental advice that he gives his own children when teaching them about the African-American community. This advice, he says, "may save their lives." One point he argues is that the "mean intelligence of blacks is much lower than for whites.” Much has been written about the falsity of his claims and the racist undertones of his overall argument. But derbyshire is correct in writing that there are "no black Fields Medal winners." Jonathan Farley is a professor of mathematics and recipient of the Harvard Foundation's Scientist of the Year medal in 2004. He explains why no African-Americans have yet to receive the prestigious Fields Medal.

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Schoolbook

Looking Outside of Schools for Science and Technology

Tuesday, January 24, 2012

WNYC's Brian Lehrer discusses how to get your child exposed to science, technology, engineering and math (STEM) both in and outside of school with the head of the New York Hall of Science in Queens.

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On Being

Mario Livio — Who Ordered This? New Mysteries of an Expanding Universe [remix]

Thursday, December 08, 2011

Astrophysicist Mario Livio works with science the Hubble Space Telescope makes possible. He is not a religious person. But he's fascinated with the enduring mystery of the very language of science, mathematics.

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On Being

[Unedited] Mario Livio with Krista Tippett

Thursday, December 08, 2011

Astrophysicist Mario Livio works with science the Hubble Space Telescope makes possible. He is not a religious person. But he's fascinated with the enduring mystery of the very language of science, mathematics.

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Radiolab

Pass the Science

Tuesday, March 22, 2011

Richard Holmes went to Cambridge University intending to study the lives of poets. Until a dueling mathematician, and a dinner conversation composed entirely of gestures, changed his mind.

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Features

Time After Time: Tom Stoppard's 'Arcadia' Revisits Broadway

Friday, March 18, 2011

Tom Stoppard’s play "Arcadia" opened Thursday night for a limited run at the Ethel Barrymore Theatre. Parallel temporal universes are Stoppardian stock-in-trade, but "Arcadia" abounds in complex dualities of all kinds.

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The Takeaway

Here’s to Benny and the Sets

Monday, October 18, 2010

Benoit Mandelbrot died last week. As a mathematician he may have as much impact as any number cruncher since maybe Euclid, who gave us regular old geometry, or Charles Babbage, who laid the groundwork for the modern computer, or folks like Euler and Hilbert and Gauss just famous monster geniuses of numbers. Mandelbrot’s genius was in having the vision to fuse a simple abstract notion about geometry with the power of the computer. Good old Euclid shows us how lines and points and surfaces behave in space and the immutable laws that seem to keep them in a state of perpetual orderliness. Mandelbrot thinks of mathematical objects as having a history. They are the product of millions of calculations that determine their size and space. Shapes, for instance, are histories of repeated computations that together constitute complex surfaces or they replicate complex processes like life itself. Mandelbrot’s fractals are capable of modeling all kinds of complicated phenomena. They are the key to creating simulations with rich computer graphics so essential for everything from video games to movie special effects to weather and planetary scale climate simulators. (READ MORE)

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The Takeaway

Benoit Mandelbrot Dies at 85

Monday, October 18, 2010

Maverick mathmatician, Benoit Mandelbrot, died yesterday, at age 85 of pancreatic cancer. Considered the father of fractal geometry, he coined the term "fractal," described the Mandelbrot set, and is arguably the most influential figure inside of mathematics within the last half-century. We'll take a look at his impact, and his legacy.

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Selected Shorts

Passionate Pursuits

Sunday, May 23, 2010

Two stories about passionate pursuits—cerebral and visceral.   

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Radiolab

Are We Coins?

Monday, June 29, 2009

We follow up on our Stochasticity show with an exploration pf whether the little choices we make every day are predictable or not.

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Radiolab

A Very Lucky Wind

Monday, June 15, 2009

Laura Buxton, an English girl just shy of ten years old, didn't realize the strange course her life would take after her red balloon was swept away into the sky. It drifted south over England, bearing a small label that said, "Please send back to Laura Buxton." What happened next ...

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Radiolab

Yellow Fluff and Other Curious Encounters

Monday, January 12, 2009

Stories of love and loss in the name of science.

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