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Martin Luther King Jr.

From the Top

Jamaica Plain, Massachusetts

Saturday, January 17, 2015

From the Bethel African Methodist Episcopal Church in Jamaica Plain, Mass., From the Top celebrates the legacy of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. through the eyes of today's teenagers.

The Leonard Lopate Show

On MLK's Letter from Birmingham Jail

Wednesday, August 28, 2013

Martin Luther King, Jr.  was arrested in Birmingham, Alabama, on Good Friday, April 12, 1963, and while he was in jail, he saw in the newspaper a statement from eight "moderate" clergymen who branded the civil rights protests extremist and "untimely." King drafted a furious rebuttal that became known as the "Letter from Birmingham Jail"—a work that would become a masterpieces of American moral argument and would inspire not just the marchers of Birmingham and Selma, but peaceful insurgents from Tiananmen to Tahrir Squares. Jonathan Rieder discusses the Letter, looking at its timeless message and its crucial position in the history of civil rights. His book Gospel of Freedom: Martin Luther King, Jr.’s Letter from Birmingham Jail and the Struggle That Changed a Nation gives us a new perspective on the Letter and the man who wrote it.

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From the Top

Jamaica Plain, Massachusetts

Saturday, January 19, 2013

This week, from the Bethel African Methodist Episcopal Church in Jamaica Plain, Mass., From the Top celebrates the legacy of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. through the eyes of today's teenagers. You'll hear the Boston Children's Chorus sing several inspiring pieces and meet a 17-year-old bassoonist whose path parallels Coretta Scott King's early years in music.

NYPR Archives & Preservation

Previously Unreleased Interviews with The Reverend Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.

Tuesday, January 15, 2013

In 1961, a radio reporter named Eleanor Fischer spoke to Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. for a CBC called Project 62. As far as we know, these unedited interviews have never been presented in their entirety until now.

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The Brian Lehrer Show

Open Phones: Education and Civil Rights

Friday, January 13, 2012

In anticipation of the MLK event this weekend at the Brooklyn Museum, we ask: What would it take to make quality education a civil right for all Americans? Is it already?

→ Join the Conversation at Schoolbook

It's A Free Blog

Opinion: Two Anniversaries, One Vision of Nonviolence

Monday, January 09, 2012

Arizona Congresswoman Gabrielle Giffords led a recitation of the Pledge of Allegiance on Sunday, one year after a shooting spree that claimed six lives and left her gravely wounded.

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The Takeaway

Civil Rights Advocate Fred Shuttlesworth Dies at 89

Thursday, October 06, 2011

Fred Shuttlesworth, a civil rights leader who helped bring Birmingham, Alabama to the forefront of the civil rights movement. Shuttlesworth worked alongside Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King Jr., died on Wednesday at age 89. Shuttlesworth often spoke publicly against the violence that was prevalent in the South at that time, and founded the Alabama Christian Movement for Human Rights.

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The Takeaway

'The Mountaintop' Imagines Martin Luther King's Final Hours

Friday, September 23, 2011

In April of 1968, Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. gave an eerily prescient speech. "I just want to do God's will,"  he said. "And He's allowed me to go up to the mountain. And I've looked over. And I've seen the promised land. I may not get there with you. But I want you to know tonight, that we, as a people, will get to the promised land!" King was assassinated at the Lorraine Motel in Memphis, Tennessee the following day. A new Broadway play called "The Mountaintop" imagines what King's private moments in his hotel room were like in the hours leading up to his death. The play stars Samuel L. Jackson as King and Angela Bassett as Camae, a maid in the Lorraine Hotel.

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WNYC News

MLK's Son Weighs in on Wage Bill on Anniversary of Assassination

Monday, April 04, 2011

On the anniversary of his father's assassination, Martin Luther King III urged the city on Monday to pass a controversial wage bill.

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WNYC News

MLK 2011: Sharpton Updates the Struggle, Bloomberg Gets Jeered

Tuesday, January 18, 2011

WNYC

In his annual tribute to Dr. Martin Luther King, the Rev. Al Sharpton and his parade of guests urged the crowd to fight the modern battle against inequality. And in at least once instance, that meant, for some, booing the person at the podium.

"We must deal with the issues of today," said Sharpton, who flew into the event after spending the morning in Washington DC. He equated the need to update the civil rights struggle today with the 1965 television sitcom F-Troop, which, according to Sharpton drew its humor from the fact that the post-Civil War soldiers "were fighting a war that had already been fought."

"The problem with many of us today is we want to fight the civil rights battle of 50 years ago," said Sharpton. "And not deal with the civil rights battle of today."

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The Leonard Lopate Show

Martin Luther King Day Gospel

Monday, January 17, 2011

Leonard hosts his annual Martin Luther King Day gospel hour.

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The Brian Lehrer Show

MLK: King's Economic Dream

Monday, January 17, 2011

It's A Free Blog

How Would the King Rate the President?

Monday, January 17, 2011

Throughout the course of his all too brief life, Dr. Martin Luther King used the power of the spoken word to deliver both messages of warning and redemption for a nation that had not lived up to the true meaning of its creed. Now, as we fast forward nearly fifty years after he delivered his most famous speech on the national mall in Washington, America has its first president of color in Barack Obama.

But I firmly believe that King, operating under the guise of the universal Negro principle, “All my skin folk ain’t my kin folk," would not shy away from criticizing Obama where he found both our nation and our leader lacking.

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It's A Free Country ®

King's Dream In Today's Economy

Monday, January 17, 2011

On the eve of Martin Luther King Jr. Day, WNYC presented the fourth annual celebration of the civil rights leader at the Brooklyn Museum. Some of the panelists were members of King’s generation who knew him personally, and some were younger activists, artists, and scholars who have been inspired by his legacy and vision. They included Roy Innis, Obery Hendricks, Christine Yvette Lewis, Jeanne TheoharisPeniel Joseph, and Natalia Aristizabal-Betancur.

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The Takeaway

On Martin Luther King Day, Hearing from His Namesakes

Monday, January 17, 2011

Today is Martin Luther King, Jr. Day, and whether or not you do something special to commemorate the day, chances are, you know MLK’s name well. No doubt, you’ve heard it hundreds, if not thousands of times. But we wanted to find out is what’s it like to be named Martin Luther King, when you are not, in fact, the civil rights leader or one of his descendants? We speak with three very different men who are all named after Martin Luther King, Jr..

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It's A Free Blog

Restoring the Dream of Nonviolence

Monday, January 17, 2011

A national holiday is nice; but it is not enough. To honor and respect the memory of Dr. King, those massacred in Arizona and all Americans who have lost their lives to senseless violence, we must show the courage on the issue of gun control.

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Features

What's On: A Martin Luther King, Jr. Day Round-Up

Friday, January 14, 2011

Banks will be shuttered, the post office will be closed, as the nation pauses to mark the 25th Martin Luther King Jr. Day on Monday, January 17. Here’s a round-up of some of our favorite M.L.K. Day offerings this year in New York.

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It's A Free Country ®

What Would MLK Add to the Debate about Public Employees?

Friday, January 14, 2011

The thing that sort of set it apart from most strikes was the sign the men made themselves, and it said "I am a man." That meant this was about human rights, being respected as person, not only about wages, benefits, the kind of things you try to get when you form a union.

Michael Honey, former Southern civil rights organizer and professor of labor and ethnic history at the University of Washington-Tacoma, on The Brian Lehrer Show.

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The Brian Lehrer Show

MLK and Economic Justice

Friday, January 14, 2011

Michael Honey, former Southern civil rights organizer and professor of labor and ethnic history at the University of Washington-Tacoma, discusses Martin Luther King Jr.'s economic justice legacy. Honey is the editor of "All Labor Has Dignity," a new collection of King's speeches on labor rights and economic justice, and the author of Going Down Jericho Road: The Memphis Strike, Martin Luther King's Last Campaign.

→ Read More and Join the Discussion at It's A Free Country

Transportation Nation

Light Rail, and All That Stands in the Way

Thursday, April 29, 2010

(Houston, TX - Melissa Galvez, KUHF News Lab) -- If you don’t have a car in Houston, life can be very difficult.  So you might think that communities would be clamoring to get the new light rail line through their neighborhood; but in fact, there’s been opposition across the city, even as construction plows ahead on 3 of 5 proposed new lines. Concerns about eminent domain, gentrification, danger to children—even a tree—stand in the way of a harmonious ground-breaking.  But other residents welcome rail with open arms.  They look around at their crumbling neighborhoods and hope the train will being the economic development they so desperately need.  A look at the perhaps unlikely outlines of the light rail debate.

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