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Mars Rover

The Leonard Lopate Show

Lead Wars, Hem Performs Live, Mars Rover, Nadeem Aslam's New Novel

Thursday, May 02, 2013

We’ll find out how the effort to protect children from lead poisoning became one of the most contentious and bitter battles in the history of public health. The Brooklyn-based band Hem perform songs form their new album “Departure and Farewell.” Adam Steltzner, the leader of the Mars Rover’s entry, descent, and landing team, and New Yorker staff writer Burkhard Bilger discuss the Mars Rover and the future of NASA. And Nadeem Aslam talks about his latest novel, The Blind Man’s Garden.

The Leonard Lopate Show

The Mars Rover

Thursday, May 02, 2013

New Yorker staff writer Burkhard Bilger and Adam Steltzner, the leader of the Mars Rover's entry, descent, and landing team, talk about the Mars Rover, NASA, and federal finding. Bilger wrote the article “The Martian Chroniclers” in the April 22, 2013, issue of The New Yorker.

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The Leonard Lopate Show

Please Explain: The Year in Science 2012

Friday, January 11, 2013

Corey S. Powell, Editor at Large of Discover magazine, talks about the biggest stories in science last year—including the new Mars rover; the discovery of the Higgs boson; the Human Microbiome Project; climate change, storms, and melting polar ice; private space flight; self-driving cars; the comeback of measles, mumps, and whooping cough; and more!

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Transportation Nation

Super HD Pics: NASA Rover Shows Mars Looks "Surprisingly" Like Grand Canyon

Tuesday, August 28, 2012

A chapter of the layered geological history of Mars is laid bare in this postcard from NASA's Curiosity rover. The image shows the base of Mount Sharp.  (NASA/JPL-Caltech/MSSS)

NASA's curiosity rover is snapping high resolution pictures with a 100mm Mast Camera zoom lens aimed at Mt. Sharp, the eventual destination of the rover. It's like Wall-E with a laser beam and Hollywood film crew strapped to his head. Very cool stuff.

The image above is a smaller portion of a this photo. NASA scientists were nice enough to  enhance the color to show the Martian scenescape under lighting conditions we Earthlings can recognize more easily.

The space agency points out that early photos coming back from the mission -- which is already gathering more data than any other mission -- show a landscape surprisingly similar to our own Grand Canyon.

What do you think? Does it make you want to take a trip out to to Arizona to see our own slice of extra-planetary wilderness?

The gravelly area around Curiosity's landing site is visible in the foreground. Farther away, about a third of the way up from the bottom of the image, the terrain falls off into a depression (a swale). Beyond the swale, in the middle of the image, is the boulder-strewn, red-brown rim of a moderately-sized impact crater. Farther off in the distance, there are dark dunes and then the layered rock at the base of Mount Sharp. Some haze obscures the view, but the top ridge, depicted in this image, is 10 miles (16.2 kilometers) away. (NASA/JPL-Caltech/MSSS)

 

Before NASA's Curiosity rover landed on Mars, the strata exposed in Mount Sharp were compared to those in the Grand Canyon of the western United States, shown here. Now that the rover has arrived, scientists are surprised by just how close the similarities between the two terrains are. The lower reaches of Mount Sharp form a succession of strata as thick as those exposed in the Grand Canyon, and with a diversity of colors to match, complete with buttes and mesas. The major difference is that the strata of the Grand Canyon are exposed along a great valley, whereas the strata of Mount Sharp are exposed along the flanks of a great mountain. (NASA/JPL-Caltech)

Mars images from NASA here.

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Transportation Nation

Watch Stunning Video of Curiosity Rover Falling onto Mars

Friday, August 24, 2012


The NASA Mars rover mission continues to churn out drama made for TV. It has already delivered seven minutes of terror with the landing, propelled the mohawked geek dreamboy Bobak Ferdowsi to the pinnacle of fame, (the Not My Job quiz on NPR's Wait Wait Don't Tell Me) and it could reignite interest in the space program.

If that happens, it will be because of the images. We loved to watch the blue-shirted scientists leaping with joy trading charmingly awkward high-fives after the successful landing, but now we're wowed by high definition video of Mars itself.

Here are two videos of the descent of Curiosity onto the surface of the Mars. Watch them all the way through. In the one above, you can see what look like clouds around 40 seconds in as the rover lands in a crater on Mars. Turn on HD and make it full screen for the full effect. It's like parachuting onto the red planet through your screen.

The second video keeps the heat shield in the frame so it's a bit less shaky and feels a more like NASA dropped a frisbee into a pile of orange sand from a jet plane.

 

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Transportation Nation

Curiosity Mars Rover Lands on Mars, Looks for Life

Tuesday, August 07, 2012

Mary Roach (photo by David Paul Morris)

What’s the size of a car, but travels 13,000 miles an hour? That would be the Curiosity Mars rover, which touched down on the Red Planet Monday after eight months of travel and what NASA engineers called "seven minutes of terror."

The rover will spend the next two years looking for signs of life on the planet. And it could also bring new life to the U.S. space program. The project was managed by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory at the California Institute of Technology, which faces significant budget cuts to operations and Mars missions.

Journalist Mary Roach wrote Packing For Mars, a book about what it would take to prepare people to travel to Mars, and the future of space exploration. She spoke with KALW’s Casey Miner about what happens now that Curiosity has touched down.

"It landed right where they wanted it to and everything went right," said Roach. "And [it's] just this unbelievable human achievement. Thousands of people working for the better part of a decade. To do that and it all comes together in this very brief chunk of minutes."

Listen to the interview below.

 

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WNYC News

First Pictures from Curiosity’s Martian Adventure

Monday, August 06, 2012

NASA is marveling over the Mars rover’s first photographs — grainy, black-and-white images of Martian gravel, a mountain at sunset and, most exciting of all, the spacecraft's white-knuckle plunge through the red planet's atmosphere.

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The Brian Lehrer Show

Curiosity on Mars

Monday, August 06, 2012

Tariq Malik, managing editor for SPACE.com, talks about NASA's Curiosity rover and what it's looking for on Mars.

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WNYC News

Want a Front Row Seat to the Mars Landing? Try Times Square

Sunday, August 05, 2012

New Yorkers who want to witness the  historic landing Sunday of the Mars Planetary Rover Curiosity can do so from Times Square.

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Studio 360

The Decade Revisited

Thursday, December 31, 2009

This weekend, Studio 360 broadcasts its special time travel show, recorded in front of a live audience at WNYC's Jerome L. Greene Performance Space.  And with this decade coming to an end, it seems like a good opportunity to revisit some of the events and trends from the 2000's that we'll always remember.

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