Streams

 

Mars

The Leonard Lopate Show

Growing Aliens in a Laboratory

Tuesday, January 20, 2015

Science writer Corey Powell describes how recent discoveries in the lab are changing minds about what extraterrestrials might look like and where they might be found. 

Comments [6]

The Leonard Lopate Show

Exploring Muslim Identity in Theater, Comedy, and Revolution

Tuesday, January 20, 2015

Aasif Mandvi guest hosts. Thanassis Cambanis on revolution in Cairo. Ayad Akhtar on heading to Broadway. Corey Powell on life on Mars. Dean Obeidallah on religion and comedy. 

The Takeaway

Building a Case for Life on Mars

Tuesday, December 09, 2014

New evidence shows that early in the history of the planet, Mars likely had rivers, lakes, and oceans of water for tens of millions of years—potentially long enough for life to form.

Comments [2]

The Takeaway

The True Story Behind the Mars Rover

Tuesday, October 21, 2014

A former NASA chief engineer and co-author of "Mars Rover Curiosity: An Inside Account from Curiosity's Chief Engineer" details the saga leading up to Curiosity's launch.

Comments [1]

The Takeaway

MAVEN Mission Probes Mars Mysteries

Tuesday, September 23, 2014

The Mars Atmosphere and Volatile Evolution mission, otherwise known as MAVEN, may soon find answers to some of the most mysterious questions surrounding Mars.

Comments [1]

Radiolab

What's Better Than A Total Eclipse Of The Sun? Check This

Tuesday, July 22, 2014

This may be the most heart-rending, most beautiful eclipse in our solar system. But you can't travel to see it. Not yet.

Read More

Comments [4]

Studio 360

Hacking the Climate

Friday, July 18, 2014

Geoengineering — tampering with the Earth’s climate — is a sci-fi idea that could very well become a reality. But it’s controversial, because it’s impossible to know the long-term effects of tampering with such a complex system.

Comment

The Takeaway

NASA Plans Life on Mars by 2030

Thursday, July 03, 2014

Ellen Stofan is NASA's Chief Scientist. She says that nowadays, her focus is on figuring out how to get astronauts to Mars—and not just for a quick touchdown, either. Stofan says she's optimistic, despite the challenges, that space travelers can take their first steps on Mars by 2030.

Comments [1]

Life of the Law

An Architect’s Code

Tuesday, May 28, 2013

In its code of ethics, the American Institute of Architects requires members to “uphold human rights.” But what does that mean when it comes to prisons—specificially, those that confine inmates largely to their cells with little to do?

Comment

The New Yorker: Out Loud

Burkhard Bilger on his writing career.

Monday, April 15, 2013

Burkhard Bilger on his writing career.

Comment

Studio 360

How America Fell for the Mars Rover

Friday, January 11, 2013

When NASA first landed a man on the moon (which we do believe happened), an estimated 500 million people worldwide watched on TV. Decades later, when the shuttle program was canceled, and manned space flight just about abandoned, a lot of Americans felt that NASA lost its mojo ...

Video: Mars Science Laboratory Curiosity Rover Animation

Comments [4]

Soundcheck

Sinkane: A West African Hero Meets East African Sound

Thursday, November 08, 2012

If you happened to attend any of this year's CMJ Music Marathon in New York City, chances are you came across the name Sinkane. It's the project of guitarist and singer Ahmed Gallab -- who, in the past, has drummed for Of Montreal, Yeasayer and Caribou. The band played six CMJ shows in just three days, and then topped off an exhausting weekend with a release show for its debut album, Mars

The name "Sinkane" is inspired by Joseph Cinqué, a West African who was illegally enslaved in the mid-19th century and eventually led a slave revolt on the ship Amistad. As Gallab tells host John Schaefer, "Sinkane is a word that I misheard in a Kanye West lyric. I heard the song 'Never Let Me Down' on his first record, and J. Ivy, who's rapping, says, 'Give us, us free like Cinqué,' which I misheard as Sinkane. I created this idea of who Sinkane was in my mind."

Gallab, who was born in Sudan, combines his love of East African soul with his indie pop and dance-ready electronic grooves on Sinkane's debut album. He and his bandmates perform a live set in our studio. 

Comments [2]

Radiolab

Krulwich Wonders: Are Those Spidery Black Things on Mars Dangerous? (Maybe)

Wednesday, October 03, 2012

NPR

Every spring, spidery black thingies show up on Mars. Take a look at some photos, and read a few of the best explanations for what scientists think they might be.

Read More

Comments [10]

Transportation Nation

Super HD Pics: NASA Rover Shows Mars Looks "Surprisingly" Like Grand Canyon

Tuesday, August 28, 2012

A chapter of the layered geological history of Mars is laid bare in this postcard from NASA's Curiosity rover. The image shows the base of Mount Sharp.  (NASA/JPL-Caltech/MSSS)

NASA's curiosity rover is snapping high resolution pictures with a 100mm Mast Camera zoom lens aimed at Mt. Sharp, the eventual destination of the rover. It's like Wall-E with a laser beam and Hollywood film crew strapped to his head. Very cool stuff.

The image above is a smaller portion of a this photo. NASA scientists were nice enough to  enhance the color to show the Martian scenescape under lighting conditions we Earthlings can recognize more easily.

The space agency points out that early photos coming back from the mission -- which is already gathering more data than any other mission -- show a landscape surprisingly similar to our own Grand Canyon.

What do you think? Does it make you want to take a trip out to to Arizona to see our own slice of extra-planetary wilderness?

The gravelly area around Curiosity's landing site is visible in the foreground. Farther away, about a third of the way up from the bottom of the image, the terrain falls off into a depression (a swale). Beyond the swale, in the middle of the image, is the boulder-strewn, red-brown rim of a moderately-sized impact crater. Farther off in the distance, there are dark dunes and then the layered rock at the base of Mount Sharp. Some haze obscures the view, but the top ridge, depicted in this image, is 10 miles (16.2 kilometers) away. (NASA/JPL-Caltech/MSSS)

 

Before NASA's Curiosity rover landed on Mars, the strata exposed in Mount Sharp were compared to those in the Grand Canyon of the western United States, shown here. Now that the rover has arrived, scientists are surprised by just how close the similarities between the two terrains are. The lower reaches of Mount Sharp form a succession of strata as thick as those exposed in the Grand Canyon, and with a diversity of colors to match, complete with buttes and mesas. The major difference is that the strata of the Grand Canyon are exposed along a great valley, whereas the strata of Mount Sharp are exposed along the flanks of a great mountain. (NASA/JPL-Caltech)

Mars images from NASA here.

Read More

Comments [1]

Radiolab

Curiosity zaps Mars

Tuesday, August 21, 2012

The Mars rover Curiosity begins to explore that distant, dusty planet, shooting lasers, and sending pictures.

Read More

Comments [3]

The Takeaway

Bobak Ferdowsi: The New Face (and Hair) of NASA

Friday, August 10, 2012

He's young, good looking, and has a mohawk bespeckled with bleached blonde stars. He's also the flight director of the Mars Science laboratory Curiosity Mission at the Jet propulsion Lab in California. Bobak Ferdowsi discusses the Curiosity landing and his new found celebrity.

Comments [3]

World Weekly with Gideon Rachman

Curiosity on Mars and the future of space exploration

Friday, August 10, 2012

Curiosity on Mars and the future of space exploration

Comment

Transportation Nation

Curiosity Mars Rover Lands on Mars, Looks for Life

Tuesday, August 07, 2012

Mary Roach (photo by David Paul Morris)

What’s the size of a car, but travels 13,000 miles an hour? That would be the Curiosity Mars rover, which touched down on the Red Planet Monday after eight months of travel and what NASA engineers called "seven minutes of terror."

The rover will spend the next two years looking for signs of life on the planet. And it could also bring new life to the U.S. space program. The project was managed by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory at the California Institute of Technology, which faces significant budget cuts to operations and Mars missions.

Journalist Mary Roach wrote Packing For Mars, a book about what it would take to prepare people to travel to Mars, and the future of space exploration. She spoke with KALW’s Casey Miner about what happens now that Curiosity has touched down.

"It landed right where they wanted it to and everything went right," said Roach. "And [it's] just this unbelievable human achievement. Thousands of people working for the better part of a decade. To do that and it all comes together in this very brief chunk of minutes."

Listen to the interview below.

 

Read More

Comment

The Takeaway

NASA's Rover Lands on Mars

Monday, August 06, 2012

In the most anticipated rover landing in a generation, NASA landed its Mars Curiosity Rover on Mars at 1:31 am EST this morning. Curiosity will remain on Mars for two years, trying to find a signs that the planet can support life.

Comments [4]

The Brian Lehrer Show

Curiosity on Mars

Monday, August 06, 2012

Tariq Malik, managing editor for SPACE.com, talks about NASA's Curiosity rover and what it's looking for on Mars.

Comments [9]