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March On Washington

The Takeaway

Infographic: American Attitudes on Civil Rights

Wednesday, August 28, 2013

As part of our series on the 50th anniversary of the March on Washington and the future of the civil rights movement, The Takeaway partnered with YouGov to conduct a survey that highlights American attitudes toward civil rights.

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The Brian Lehrer Show

50th Anniversary of the March on Washington

Wednesday, August 28, 2013

Fifty years ago today, hundreds of thousands gathered on the Mall in Washington, DC to call for increased civil rights for African-Americans. Peniel Joseph, professor of history and founding director of the Center for the Study of Race and Democracy at Tufts University, and author of Dark Days, Bright Nights: From Black Power to Barack Obama, reflects upon the March on Washington and Dr Martin Luther King's famous "I Have a Dream" speech.

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The Leonard Lopate Show

On MLK's Letter from Birmingham Jail

Wednesday, August 28, 2013

Martin Luther King, Jr.  was arrested in Birmingham, Alabama, on Good Friday, April 12, 1963, and while he was in jail, he saw in the newspaper a statement from eight "moderate" clergymen who branded the civil rights protests extremist and "untimely." King drafted a furious rebuttal that became known as the "Letter from Birmingham Jail"—a work that would become a masterpieces of American moral argument and would inspire not just the marchers of Birmingham and Selma, but peaceful insurgents from Tiananmen to Tahrir Squares. Jonathan Rieder discusses the Letter, looking at its timeless message and its crucial position in the history of civil rights. His book Gospel of Freedom: Martin Luther King, Jr.’s Letter from Birmingham Jail and the Struggle That Changed a Nation gives us a new perspective on the Letter and the man who wrote it.

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The Leonard Lopate Show

“King: A Filmed Record”

Wednesday, August 28, 2013

Richard Kaplan discusses the “King: A Filmed Record,” which chronicles the life and work of Dr. Martin Luther King, from the start of his non-violent campaign for equal rights to his assassination in Memphis in 1968. Candid footage of Dr. King and newsreel coverage of the protests and counter-protests are accompanied by narrators including Harry Belafonte, Ruby Dee, Ben Gazzara, Charlton Heston, James Earl Jones, Paul Newman, and Joanne Woodward. “King: A Filmed Record” is playing at Film Forum at 7:10 pm, on August 28.

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WNYC News

Video: White House Marks Anniversary of March on Washington, MLK "Dream" Speech

Wednesday, August 28, 2013

President Obama hosted the Let Freedom Ring ceremony today at the National Mall in Washington, D.C., to commemorate the 50th anniversary of the Rev. Martin Luther King Jr. delivering his historic "I Have a Dream" speech. Watch the video.

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The Takeaway

Roundtable: The March on Washington & The Future of the Civil Rights Movement

Wednesday, August 28, 2013

Joining The Takeaway to discuss the future of the civil rights movement and what can be done to accomplish the objectives of the March on Washington, which took place 50 years ago today, is Farai Chideya, a distinguished writer in residence at New York University’s Journalism Institute; Peter Blair Henry, the Dean of New York University’s Stern School of Business; and George Packer, a staff writer at The New Yorker.

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WNYC News

MICROPOLIS: Revisiting the 1963 March on Washington

Wednesday, August 28, 2013

The March on Washington  — 50 years ago today — brought a quarter million demonstrators to the nation's capital, but it was planned and coordinated right here, in New York. It was an enormous logistical operation, years before cell phones and email, and it all happened uptown, in an office on 130th Street in Harlem.

The New York contingent was so big, that the MTA ran extra subway trains after midnight. Hundreds of buses set out for Washington, from across the city. Black firefighters made the trip, having been trained by Rustin in non-violent crowd control. So did local cops -- Horowitz said for the first time they were allowed to travel without their guns, because Mayor Robert Wagner lifted a city ordinance just for the occasion. Mildred Roxboro, an NAACP activist in her 80s who grew up under segregation in Tennessee, says the amount of effort that went into the event corresponded to the mounting tension within the civil rights community.
MILDRED ROXBORO: The feeling was that we have been pushed to a precipice here, and we have got to do something to get the conscience of this nation involved, so it can be understood that this cannot continue. 

 

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The Leonard Lopate Show

Fifty Years After the March on Washington; Fifty Years of the Mets

Wednesday, August 28, 2013

Today, we’ll mark the 50th Anniversary of the March on Washington. Jonathan Rieder talks about Martin Luther King Jr.’s famous “Letter from Birmingham Jail.” We’ll discuss a documentary about Dr. King’s life and work, from the beginnings of his campaign for civil rights to his assassination in 1968. We’ll look at the role civil rights activist Bayard Rustin played in the movement. He was marginalized for being openly gay. We’ll joined by his partner, Walter Naegle. And we’ll discuss another 50 year anniversary with former New York Times columnist Ira Berkow and the time he’s covered the NY Mets.

The Brian Lehrer Show

50 Years After the March; Candidates for Manhattan Boro President

Wednesday, August 28, 2013

It was 50 years ago today that Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. gave his speech at the March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom. Professor Peniel Joseph of Tufts University’s Center for Race and Democracy talks about the anniversary and the continued discussion about civil rights. Then, the four candidates in the primary race for Manhattan Borough President (Robert Jackson, Jessica Lapin, Julie Menin, and Gale Brewer) make their case to voters.

The Leonard Lopate Show

The Life and Legacy of Civil Rights Leader Bayard Rustin

Wednesday, August 28, 2013

Producer-director Bennett Singer discusses the film “Brother Outsider,” a documentary exploring the life and work of civil rights activist Bayard Rustin, who influenced Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr., and played a major role in organizing the 1963 March on Washington. Rustin’s role in the civil rights movement has been overlooked largely because he lived as an openly gay man. Walter Naegle, Rustin’s life partner from 1977 until Rustin's death in 1987, and who will be accepting the Presidential Medal of Freedom on Rustin's behalf, also joins the conversation. “Brother Outsider” airs on the World Channel on August 28, at 7 pm and midnight.

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The Takeaway

Syrian Conflict Enters New Phase | The March on Washington & Future of the Civil Rights Movement | The Film Industry is Leaving Hollywood Behind

Wednesday, August 28, 2013

As Syrian Conflict Enters New Phase, Possibilities for a U.S. Intervention | Roundtable: The March on Washington & Future of the Civil Rights Movement | Fires Continue To Rage Around Yosemite National Park | The Film Industry is Leaving Hollywood Behind | New Report Shows Ohio Police Secretly Use Facial Recognition ...

The Brian Lehrer Show

The Man Behind "The Butler"

Tuesday, August 27, 2013

Wil Haygood, long-time Washington Post columnist on race and politics, who wrote the article that inspired the new movie "Lee Daniels’ The Butler", discusses his piece, and his work covering race and civil rights, one day before the anniversary of the March on Washington.

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The Takeaway

Pressure Mounts for the U.S. and Allies to Respond in Syria | Chelsea Manning & the Transgender Prison Experience | Reflecting on the March on Washington

Monday, August 26, 2013

Pressure Mounts for the U.S. and Allies to Respond in Syria | Chelsea Manning & the Transgender Prison Experience | Bo Xilai Trial Ends in China | A 12-Year-Old Tech Prodigy's Mission | Predicting Crime Through Data | Reflecting on the March on Washington 

Together In Song

I Have a Dream

Sunday, August 25, 2013

We mark the 50th anniversary of Dr. King’s landmark speech on the Washington Mall, and hear his message – and even his words – put to music.

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The Takeaway

Revisiting the Civil Rights Movement Ahead of the March on Washington's 50th Anniversary

Friday, August 23, 2013

On the morning of August 28th 1963 the idea of America was tested and in the sounds of feet stepping and buses parking, there was a sign early that day that something would happen. It would not be a normal day, in Washington, in America, in the world. The March on Washington D.C. was a grass roots event, a first of its kind national news event. Today The Takeaway takes a look back on the March on Washington.

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