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Mao Zedong

The Leonard Lopate Show

The Chinese Revolution 1945-1957

Tuesday, December 24, 2013

Frank Dikötter chronicles Mao Zedong’s ascension and his campaign to transform the Chinese into what the party called New People. Due to the secrecy surrounding the country’s records, little has been known before now about the eight years preceding the massive famine and Great Leap Forward. In The Tragedy of Liberation: A History of the Chinese Revolution 1945-1957, Dikötter draws on hundreds of previously classified documents, secret police reports, unexpurgated versions of leadership speeches, eyewitness accounts of those who survived to reveal the horrific policies they implemented in the name of progress.

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The Leonard Lopate Show

The Chinese Revolution 1945-1957

Tuesday, October 01, 2013

Frank Dikötter chronicles Mao Zedong’s ascension and his campaign to transform the Chinese into what the party called New People. Due to the secrecy surrounding the country’s records, little has been known before now about the eight years preceding the massive famine and Great Leap Forward. In The Tragedy of Liberation: A History of the Chinese Revolution 1945-1957, Dikötter draws on hundreds of previously classified documents, secret police reports, unexpurgated versions of leadership speeches, eyewitness accounts of those who survived to reveal the horrific policies they implemented in the name of progress.

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The Takeaway

40th Anniversary of Nixon's Visit to China

Tuesday, February 21, 2012

After 22 years of mutual isolation and hostility, it was the trip that transformed the world. From February 21-28, 1972, U.S. president Richard Nixon met with Chairman Mao Zedong and Premier Zhou Enlai, and traveled through Beijing, Hangzhou and Shanghai. In addition to formally normalizing relations between the U.S. and P.R.C., it was the first time the U.S. public had seen images of China since the communists took power. 

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Studio 360

Con Artist, Iron Fists, Talib Kweli

Friday, September 05, 2008

Nothing is quite as it seems. Kurt talks with Lee Israel about her new memoir Can You Ever Forgive Me? about her years forging letters by famous writers. Steven Heller shows us how the 20th century’s towering mad men -- Hitler, Stalin, Mao -- were masters not just of terror but of successful branding. And we’ll take a surprising look at another aspect of Mao Zedong’s rule: he wrote classical poetry like a bourgeois reactionary.

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