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Mandela

On The Media

The Photographer Behind "Selfie-Gate"

Friday, December 13, 2013

This week's media coverage of Nelson Mandela's memorial service had little to do with the service itself. There was the unexpected handshake between President Barack Obama and Cuban leader Raul Castro; the fake sign language interpreter who says he saw angels in the stadium; and of course, "selfie-gate." Brooke speaks with Roberto Schmidt, the AFP photographer who snapped the now infamous photos, about how the media have overblown the story.

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The Takeaway

Carrying Forward Mandela's Legacy

Tuesday, December 10, 2013

Today leaders from around the world converged on South Africa to pay their final respects to Nelson Mandela. "After this great liberator is laid to rest, when we have returned to our cities and villages, and rejoined our daily routines, let us search then for his strength—for his largeness of spirit—somewhere inside ourselves,” President Barack Obama said during the ceremony. As we remember Madiba, The Takeaway is asking you how America can carry forward the legacy of Nelson Mandela.

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WNYC News

Covering Mandela: A Journalist Reflects

Friday, December 06, 2013

The passing of Nelson Mandela has the entire world reflecting on his influence — positive and negative.

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Specials

Mandela: An Audio History

Friday, December 06, 2013

Mandela: An Audio History is from the award-winning radio series documenting the struggle against apartheid through intimate first-person accounts of Nelson Mandela himself, as well as those who fought with him, and against him.

Recognized as one of the most comprehensive oral histories of apartheid ever broadcast, the series weaves together more than 50 first-person interviews with an unprecedented collection of rare archival recordings, some of which had never been heard before.

First-person accounts from former ANC activists, National Party politicians, army generals, Robben Island prisoners, and ordinary witnesses to history. A range of voices from Desmond Tutu to former President F.W. de Klerk to Nelson Mandela himself.

Produced by Radio Diaries

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WNYC News

New Yorkers Mourn Mandela

Thursday, December 05, 2013

New Yorkers from the statehouse to the streets mourned South African anti-apartheid leader and former president Nelson Mandela after his death on Thursday.

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The Takeaway

Mandela Day In South Africa and the U.S.

Thursday, July 18, 2013

Today, Nelson Mandela’s birthday, is also known as “Mandela Day.” It's a day when people are encouraged to volunteer 67 minutes of their time - that's one minute for each year that Mandela served others in South Africa, while in prison and in politics. Sharing what Mandela Day means at home in South Africa, and abroad, are Anders Kelto, reporter for PRI's The World, and Ntshepeng Motema, a South African living in New York.

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The Takeaway

Senator Rand Paul on NSA & Military Sexual Assault | Mandela Day In South Africa and the U.S. | New Breakthrough for Down Syndrome

Thursday, July 18, 2013

Senator Rand Paul on the NSA Scandal & Military Sexual Assault | Mandela Day In South Africa and the U.S. | New Genetic Therapy Provides Breakthrough for Down Syndrome | What Not to Read | "Dear Malala"—A Letter From a Senior Pakistani Taliban Leader | A Look at What Went Wrong With School Meals in India

The Takeaway

Foreign Press Coverage of Mandela's Health Raises Concerns

Thursday, June 27, 2013

South Africans around the country are praying for Nelson Mandela's health. Though Johannesburg has become a place for prayer and reflection, it's also as a press hub for scores of international journalists. And the media stir over Mandela's health is causing some angst in the country. Declan Walsh, reporter for our partner The New York Times is in Johannesburg, reporting on the mood there in what could be Nelson Mandela's final days.

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The Takeaway

President Mandela's Release, 20 Years On

Thursday, February 11, 2010

20 years ago, former South African President Nelson Mandela was released from prison. He had spent 27 years behind bars, and his release came early in South Africa’s transition from an apartheid regime to a multi-racial democracy. Today, South Africa commemorates Mandela's leaving Robben Island prison – but for some, this is a bittersweet anniversary.

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The Takeaway

The Controversy Behind Eastwood's "Invictus"

Friday, December 11, 2009

Director Clint Eastwood's latest, "Invictus," opens this weekend. The film shows Nelson Mandela shortly after his release from prison, as a new president working to unite a polarized South Africa by changing the image of the nation's all-white rugby team.  Morgan Freeman and Matt Damon star in the film, but South African actors say they should be playing these major roles set in their country.

Takeaway film contributor Rafer Guzman and South African arts and entertainment journalist Nadia Neophytou discuss the convroversy behind "Invictus."

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The Takeaway

Fifteen years after Mandela, South Africa heads to the polls

Wednesday, April 22, 2009

Fifteen years after Nelson Mandela swept to an historic victory to become the first black President of South Africa, today South Africans again head to the polls. As it has for the last fifteen years, once again Nelson Mandela's party, the African National Congress, is expected to win comfortably, and the ANC's Jacob Zuma is expected to become President. But for many, South Africa has not lived up to the dreams of 1994, the year Mandela, one of the great heroes of the anti-apartheid struggle became President and a national unity government was formed. Now, almost 23% of the population is unemployed and the country is plagued with a staggeringly high murder and crime rate. Many blame South Africa's problems on the government and for the first time since 1994, the ANC faces meaningful opposition in this election.

To help paint the scene and provide some background, this morning The Takeaway talks with Andrew Meldrum, Africa Editor of the Global Post in Boston, who spent 27 years in South Africa, and with the BBC’s Africa Editor, Martin Plaut, who’s outside a polling station in a township in Cape Town.

For more on the divided opinion of Jacob Zuma, watch the video below.

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On Being

Charles Villa-Vincencio and Pumla Gobodo-Madikizela — Truth and Reconciliation [remix]

Thursday, March 22, 2007

South Africa's Truth and Reconciliation Commission (TRC) held public sessions from 1996 to 1998, and concluded its work in 2004. In an attempt to rebuild its society without retribution, the Commission created a new model for grappling with a history of e

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