Streams

 

 

Malcolm Smith

WNYC News

As Corruption Scandal Widens, Black Political Leaders Reflect on Implications

Thursday, May 09, 2013

There’s a sense that the widening corruption probe is a sad end to what once seemed to be a promising moment for black political power in Albany.

Comments [2]

WNYC News

Names Revealed of Electeds Recorded in Corruption Probe

Wednesday, May 08, 2013

A federal judge has unsealed the names of elected officials recorded on a wire by ex-state Sen. Shirley Huntley — including six sitting state Senators and one current Councilman.

Comments [1]

WNYC News

Latest Corruption Arrest Erodes Power of Minority Politicians

Monday, May 06, 2013

Another lawmaker representing New York City in Albany has been indicted. This latest case is continues to weaken the power of New York City's delegation in the New York Senate, and to lawmakers representing communities of color in particular.

Comment

WNYC News

At Corruption Appearance, Politicians Greeted by Supporters

Tuesday, April 23, 2013

Queens State Senator Malcolm Smith shook hands with well-wishers and entered a courtroom packed with supporters on Tuesday. He was being arraigned for allegedly trying to rig the mayoral election — but the only remnant of the initial outrage over the alleged corruption was a thin line of protesters outside court.

Comments [1]

WNYC News

Schneiderman Moves To Distance Himself From Corruption Case

Thursday, April 04, 2013

WNYC

Attorney General Eric Schneiderman is trying to keep as far away as possible from the corruption scandal engulfing State Senator Malcolm Smith and others.

Comment

WNYC News

Bloomberg Donated Big to County GOP Committees

Wednesday, April 03, 2013

WNYC

“I think he wanted to ensure that he would get their support in order to qualify,” said Guy V. Molinari, a former Congressman and Staten Island Borough President. “Maybe money wouldn’t have been necessary…but it sure made it a lot easier.”

Comment

WNYC News

Corruption Arrests Turns Spotlight on GOP Nominating Process

Wednesday, April 03, 2013

The arrest of six people for conspiring to sell a spot on the GOP ballot for mayor is focusing new attention on the Republican nominating process. 

Comment

WNYC News

Corruption Charges Mean Tough Questions for GOP Hopefuls

Tuesday, April 02, 2013

WNYC

The arrest of State Senator Malcolm Smith, City Councilman Daniel Halloran and two Republican party leaders on corruption charges was the elephant in the room at a GOP mayoral candidate forum Tuesday night.

Comments [1]

WNYC News

Political 'Odd Couple': A Look at Halloran and Smith's Unlikely Alliance

Tuesday, April 02, 2013

Very little prior to Tuesday’s indictment suggests Republican Councilman Dan Halloran and Democratic State Senator Malcolm Smith shared much of a connection other than Queens, the borough they both called home.

Comment

WNYC News

FBI Nabs NY Sen. Smith and Councilman Halloran in Plot to Rig Mayor's Race

Tuesday, April 02, 2013

U.S. Attorney Preet Bharara says in a statement that Smith "tried to bribe his way" into a shot at the New York City mayoral race: “The show-me-the-money culture seems to pervade every level of New York government,” he said.

Comment

The Empire

to move Democrats, a Republican points to a rule set by Democrats

Friday, January 28, 2011

The leader of the State Senate, Republican Dean Skelos, is defending a move to kick several Democratic senators out of their offices...because their rents are too (damn!) high.

"The Democrats, when they were in the majority in the Senate, set certain parameters as to district offices. $40,000 here in the city. Malcolm Smith is spending $100,000...Dan Squadron is spending over $80,000. So, they're violating their own guidelines."

Skelos, speaking to reporters after an appearance at the Association for a Better New York in Manhattan this morning, said the state senate simply can't afford those kinds of rents.

Read More

Comments [1]

Transportation Nation

TN Moving Stories: New York Pols Line Up for High-Speed Rail, Ford Posts Profit, and First Electric Smart Car Arrives In U.S.

Friday, January 28, 2011

At least the bike will be easier to dig out than the car behind it (Kate Hinds)

Dozens of passengers spent the night huddled in subway cars after the snowstorm that blanketed the northeast stranded their train in Brooklyn's Coney Island station.  But hey, that's better than the time when trains were stuck on the tracks for hours on end with no means of egress! (AP via Wall Street Journal)

Meanwhile, the MTA's web site was inaccessible to many Thursday morning as 500,000 users tried to log on at once to find out about storm-related mass transit disruptions but were unable to load the site. (WNYC)

A federal judge in St. Paul ruled Thursday that Central Corridor light-rail planners failed to analyze how construction of the 11-mile transit line would affect businesses in the corridor. (Minnesota Public RadioNote: For more on Rondo, check out TN's documentary Back of the Bus: Mass Transit, Race and Inequality

The first electric Smart car has arrived in the U.S. (Wired/Autopia)

New York State Senator Malcolm Smith, a self-described "aggressive" supporter of high-speed rail, talks about Thursday's congressional hearing--and why he's so optimistic. "This was major. Think about it -- you have a chairman of a House committee, he's a Republican from Florida, who already has high-speed rail moving in his state, here, having his first hearing of the year, in New York City, to talk about how important high-speed rail is to the Northeast Corridor...it's a major happening for this initiative." Watch the video below, or go to Capital Tonight.

Toll-takers on the Golden Gate Bridge would be eliminated in September 2012 under a plan approved Thursday by the district's finance committee. (Marin Independent Journal)

Following six fatal bicycle/car collisions in six months, Tampa is deciding whether to adopt a Bicycle Safety Plan. (ABC News)

Tweets of the day, via WNYC's Azi Paybarah, who's listening in to Mayor Bloomberg's weekly radio show: "everyone was in favor of this" @mikebloomberg says of congestion pricing." and "Shelly [Silver]'s plan was to toll all the bridges" says @mikebloomberg of the Assembly Speaker." 

Metro officially names a new director. (WAMU)

Ford says it earned $6.6 billion in 2010, its highest profit in more than a decade. (AP via NPR)

Top Transportation Nation stories that we're following: The House Committee on Transportation and Infrastructure held a hearing on high-speed rail in the Northeast yesterday; chair John Mica said 70% of all chronically delayed flights originate in New York's airspace. The takeaway: paring down short-hop flights in the Northeast will have a positive ripple effect nationally. Meanwhile, planners want NYC's airports to expand, saying that more capacity to handle more flights is desperately needed. Also: the chairman of the Port Authority of New York and New Jersey explained why doing big things in America has become so difficult, and Chicago mayoral hopeful Rahm Emanuel released his transportation plan--which, as it turns out, is a transit plan.

Follow Transportation Nation on Twitter.

Read More

Comment

The Empire

Behaving badly in Albany

Tuesday, December 07, 2010

A disturbing trend continues:

Parker did not take the stand in his own defense and will be sentenced on January 27.

It continues a troublesome trend in Albany. Since the start of 2009, eight state Senators have come under scrutiny for wrongdoing.

Here's the tally:

Kevin Parker: Was found guilty today of beating up a New York Post photographer. Parker declined to take the stand in his own defense.

Vincent Leibell: Plead guilty to obstructing justice and not reporting as income money he took from two attorneys. Leibell’s attempt to cover up the payments were secretly recorded by prosecutors.

Pedro Epsada: Allegedly steered tax-payer money from a local health care facility into his pocket. Espada maintains he’s innocent.

Hiram Monserrate: Was found guilty of misdemeanor assault related to the night he says he accidentally broke a water glass against his girlfriend’s face. Monserrate has said prosecutors unfairly went after him and ignored his side of the story.

Carl Kruger: Was investigated by federal authorities for allegedly seeking contributions in exchange for favors. The probe reportedly extended to one of Kruger’s aides.

John Sampson: Allegedly passed along sensitive information to one of the Aqueduct bidders. Also, bidders sought to curry favor with Sampson once he took over the Senate leadership from Smith.

Malcolm Smith: Stood to benefit from deals with Aqueduct bidders before he was deposed by Sampson, according to the Inspector General’s report [.pdf].

Eric Adams: Named in the IG’s report, and, to clear his name, has convened a conference call with district leaders and will send a letter to his constituents explaining what he did during the Aqueduct bidding process. He says he did nothing wrong.

Read More

Comment

WNYC News

Senate Shenigans Yield No Agreement

Thursday, June 25, 2009

Senators hold dueling factions on Senate floor on Tuesday, June 23.

Senators hold dueling factions on Senate floor on Tuesday, June 23.

If at first you don't succeed....try again. That appears to be Governor Paterson's philosophy when it comes to getting ...

Comment

WNYC News

Side by Side: Senators Monserrate and Malcolm Smith

Friday, June 12, 2009

Senators Hiram Monserrate (2nd from R) and Malcolm Smith (far right)

Senators Hiram Monserrate (2nd from R) and Malcolm Smith (far right)

State Senate business remains at a standstill as senators await a ruling on whether the GOP's surprise takeover earlier this ...

Comment

WNYC News

Senate Coup: Reform or Power Grab?

Tuesday, June 09, 2009

Senator Pedro Espada

Senator Pedro Espada

One of the dissident Democrats who joined Republicans in yesterday's leadership coup in New York's Senate says the move isn't about returning power to the GOP. Queens Democrat Hiram Monserrate tells WNYC's Brian Lehrer it's about ...

Comments [10]

WNYC News

Mayoral Control - Two Lawmakers Weigh In

Thursday, May 14, 2009

When the New York Civil Liberties Union invited reporters to hear its ideas for reforming mayoral control of the schools today, it also invited two legislators with their own strong opinions.

State Senator Bill Perkins, who represents Harlem and other parts of Manhattan, and Queens Assemblyman Rory Lancman, both support the NYCLU's goal of making the school system more transparent. The NYCLU officially takes no position on whether to renew mayoral control. But it's says the current system is "absolute" and "unfettered." It cites the reluctance by the Department of Education and NYPD to disclose information on student arrests, suspensions and expulsions. There have also been incidents in which principals don't feel like they're fully in charge of their buildings, because of the NYPD's responsibility for school safety. The report is available here.

While the NYCLU wouldn't say whether it thinks the current system of mayoral control should be diluted, the two lawmakers did share their thoughts.

State Senator Perkins is one of a handful of lawmakers who want end the mayor's control of the Panel for Educational Policy. Bloomberg currently gets to appoint eight of the 13 members, including the chancellor - who chairs the body. The five others are appointed by the borough president. In 2004, the mayor fired three panel members because they were about to vote against his plan to stop promoting third graders who got low scores on their state math and reading tests.

Comments [1]

WNYC News

Senate Reaches Tentative Deal in MTA Bailout, But the Devil Is in the Details

Tuesday, May 05, 2009

New York Senate Majority Leader Malcolm Smith says his Democratic caucus has a "framework" for an agreement on Governor Paterson's MTA rescue plan that would minimize fare hikes and service cuts. Last night he met with Long Island senators Craig Johnson and Brian Foley, who had been holding out on the plan.

Foley says one of the things that won him over was Smith's insistence on better oversight of the MTA, including a financial audit.

FOLEY: "If an when the forensic audit is completed, which will show the real expenses and real revenues for the MTA, that then we're gonna be able to make additional adjustments to the payroll tax and other payments that go to the MTA."

Foley and Johnson had been holding out primarily over the payroll tax in Paterson's plan. The governor has sought to placate suburban lawmakers with a proposal to reimburse school districts for the tax. It's not clear if they will instead push to exempt schools from the tax entirely.

Others, including Mayor Bloomberg, complain that though Paterson's plan would avert fare hikes and service cuts, it does nothing to address the agency's long-term capital needs. Paterson says the legislature may take up the capital plan later this year.

PATERSON: "The capital plan is not the issue if you are going over the bridges and the tolls are going up 30 percent, and if you live in a place where there'll be no service at all -- which is going to be the case if we don't address it -- that is the most immediate problem."

Comment

WNYC News

WFP to MTA: W.T.F.?

Tuesday, April 07, 2009

Poster

That's the theme of a new poster the Working Families Party is distributing, part of a campaign that targets state senators who aren't getting behind the MTA bailout package. The Working Families Party was a major part of the Democratic ...

Comments [3]

WNYC News

Smith Demands Transparency on MTA Budget

Monday, March 02, 2009

(Getty)

(Getty)

The Brooklyn Bridge may not be for sale, but it's one of the East River crossings that has inspired haggling worthy of a Persian marketplace. And the latest back-and-forth between the Metropolitan Transit Authority and New York State legislature has taken us one step closer to tolls on all East River crossings that are currently free.

First, the transit authority said that a $5 per vehicle toll was the minimum it would have to charge to raise revenue and close its budget gap. Then political leaders like Assembly Speaker Sheldon Silver and Mayor Bloomberg floated the idea of $2 tolls. And like a novice bargainer, the MTA agreed too soon.

Senate Leader Smith got suspicious.

This morning, he said the authority needed to agree to a full audit. 'You know they kept two books at a time,' he said.

Comments [1]