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London Riot

The Takeaway

Cameron Recruits US 'Supercop' to Advise on UK Gangs

Monday, August 15, 2011

British Prime Minister David Cameron has responded to last week's riots by bringing in outside counsel. On Saturday, Cameron announced that he’ll be seeking advisement from Bill Bratton, an American policeman with a history of combating street crime. Bratton served as New York City police commissioner under Rudy Guiliani, and as chief of police in Los Angeles he overhauled the police department after the 1992 Los Angeles riots. The British media are calling Bratton a "supercop," but the British Police have not taken kindly to the announcement.

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The Takeaway

How To Stop Gang Violence: Lessons From Chicago for the UK

Friday, August 12, 2011

How should the United Kingdom combat the violence that's raged across the country all week? British Prime Minister David Cameron says the country needs to learn a few lessons from America on how to fight gangs, along with possibly revoking social media and Blackberry service from rioters. What can the U.S. offer as advice for the U.K. on handling gang violence?

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The Takeaway

Cameron Exploring Social Media Restrictions after UK Riots

Friday, August 12, 2011

British Prime Minister David Cameron says his government will look into a possible crackdown on social media, after citizens used websites like Twitter as an organizing tool for the riots that shook cities across the U.K. earlier this week. Free speech advocates have criticized the idea, saying it's reminiscent of the social media shutdowns practiced by autocrats like former Egyptian President Hosni Mubarak. Are Cameron and Mubarak suddenly brothers in censorship? Or is this a viable method for preventing violence?

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The Takeaway

From the Royal Wedding to Riots, A Swift Downturn for the UK

Friday, August 12, 2011

In April, the climate in the United Kingdom was jubilant, as Prince William and Kate Middleton wed at Westminster Abbey. Afterward, one million people lined the route from Westminster to Buckingham Palace, and citizens threw parties and rejoiced in the streets. Four months later, the atmosphere across the pond is the complete opposite of celebratory, as riots and civil unrest spread and violence continues.

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It's A Free Country ®

London Riots Timeline, Police React

Thursday, August 11, 2011

Since I first wrote about the riots in London, the situation has evolved rapidly:

  • On Tuesday, the riots claimed their first life– a man shot in Croydon on Monday died in hospital
  • That morning, Prime Minister David Cameron flew into the country, promising a recall of ...

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The Takeaway

Cleanup Begins After Riots in London

Thursday, August 11, 2011

For more than one hundred and forty years the House of Reeves furniture store was a landmark in south London. On Tuesday night the family run business − which had survived two World World Wars, a Great Depression, and a Great Recession — was burnt to the ground by rioters. British Prime Minister David Cameron this morning announced that "the fightback has begun." This includes the painful cleanup at locations such as the House of Reeves store.

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The Takeaway

London Riots and the 'Luck' of Being British

Wednesday, August 10, 2011

On today's show, John Hockenberry interviewed one of our own, Managing Editor Rupert Allman, about his impressions of the unrest roiling Britain. Allman, of the BBC, says the line between those who feel lucky to be a British resident and those who do not is an invisible one. He spoke about unrest in his country in the 1980s, how some people feel lucky to be born in Britain, and are invested in their community, while others do not. It's a distinction that is difficult to see, but incredibly important, when the chips are down.  

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The Brian Lehrer Show

The London Riots

Wednesday, August 10, 2011

Nuala McGovern, radio presenter at the BBC's World Have Your Say, talks about the latest on the London riots--and the various theories about the root causes of the unrest.

Listeners: Do you have ties to people in the London area? What have you been hearing from your friends and family there? Let us know. Comment here!

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The Takeaway

Lessons For London From Newark

Wednesday, August 10, 2011

In 1967, police arrested an African-American cab driver in Newark, N.J. setting off six days of rioting. Last week, the police fatally shot black Briton Mark Duggan; an event that many are calling the spark that ignited four days (to date) of rioting in the U.K. But do the similarities end there? Many would argue that the underlying causes of the 1967 Newark riots — rampant joblessness, alienation and racial disparity — are the same as those that incited riots in the U.K. this week, as well as the riots that overtook America's cities in the late 1960's.

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The Takeaway

The Bleakest Generation?

Wednesday, August 10, 2011

Former London Mayor Ken Livingstone suggested that the Tottenham riot was fueled by citizens unleashing pent-up resentment over the weak economy, high unemployment rate, and historically deep budget cuts that decrease funding for poor communities in the United Kingdom. "This is the first generation since the Great Depression that have doubts about their future," he told the BBC. Those same conditions that led to the unrest in the U.K. may apply to the U.S.

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The Takeaway

A Londoner's Take On Social Tensions, Past, Present and Future

Wednesday, August 10, 2011

Journalist Rupert Allman was born in London, and lived in the British capital for much of his life before joining The Takeaway in New York as the program's managing editor. He happened to be visiting his hometown last week when the riots broke out that have since dragged on for four nights and spread to other major British cities. Like many Britons, the worst unrest in a generation has made Allman reflect on decades of failed social policy that was crafted to promote equality, but instead has ingrained societal tension further. "Social mobility has struck down and hasn't gone anywhere," Allman says. "Those at the very bottom have stayed at the very bottom."

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The Takeaway

London Riots Spread Across Britain

Wednesday, August 10, 2011

"When we see children as young as 13 looting and laughing, it is clear there are things wrong with our society," said a disgusted Prime Minister David Cameron outside 10 Downing Street this morning. London was relatively quiet last night as an additional 10,000 police officers were deployed around the city after three nights of violence, looting, and arson. However, violence spread to other major cities including Manchester and Birmingham.

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It's A Free Country ®

London is Burning, but Austerity Measures Aren't to Blame

Tuesday, August 09, 2011

In a month of street riots, budget cuts and sovereign debt crises in London, it’s hard to resist comparisons to Greece – and indeed, if you read much of the coverage in the U.S. media it would seem that London is in the grips of a raging anti-austerity protest. But while the closure of youth programs may leave more troubled teenagers idling in town centers, it doesn’t make them anti-austerity protesters.

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The Takeaway

Riots Continue to Spread Across London

Tuesday, August 09, 2011

Looting and arson has spread across London for a third successive night, as rioters took to the streets of more deprived boroughs from Hackney in the East to Ealing in the West. While much of the British capital remains quiet, including the major financial and government districts, police and fire crews have struggle to contain the violence where it has occurred. Over 450 people have been arrested, and more than 6,000 police were deployed across London on Monday night.

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The Takeaway

London Riots Result in Over 100 Arrests

Monday, August 08, 2011

Investors in London may be more worried about credit downgrades and Spanish and Italian debt this morning, but the people of London have seen a full weekend of lawlessness and rioting stemming from a police incident last week. Racial tensions are running high in the impoverished neighborhood of Tottenham where it all began, but the violence has spread to other areas known for political and ethnic tensions. The looting and violence left at least 35 police officers injured, and resulted in the arrests of more than 100 people.

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