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Living Wage

The Brian Lehrer Show

Raising the Living Wage

Wednesday, October 01, 2014

Mayor Bill de Blasio's executive order will expand the living wage law. New York Times reporter, Rachel L. Swarns, discusses the impact this executive order might have on the city.

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WNYC News

Next on De Blasio's Progressive To-Do List: Jobs

Monday, February 03, 2014

WNYC

New York's new mayor has already moved on paid sick leave and stop and frisk. He says the next priority is creating middle class jobs.

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The Brian Lehrer Show

Minimum Wage Changes

Monday, December 23, 2013

Minimum wages are going up by nearly a dollar in New York and New Jersey on January 1. Charlie Herman, business and economics editor for WNYC News, reviews the details and explains who's exempt and who's eligible for a higher "living wage.”

 

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The Brian Lehrer Show

Christmas To You; Changing Wages; Politics Here and There

Monday, December 23, 2013

Over 90 percent of Americans celebrate Christmas. We’ll hear about the different ways you and your family celebrate the Yuletide holiday. Plus: WNYC’s Charlie Herman on the difference between the living wage, the prevailing wage, and the minimum wage – and what’s changing. And we’ll hear political updates from Washington with Susan Page of USA Today, and Azi Paybarah of Capital NY on the local mayoral transition.

→ Photo Project: The Best Picture of 2013 (That's Sitting on Your Cell Phone) | Deadline Wednesday!

WNYC News

How One Homeless Woman Helped Double the Paychecks of 1,400 Workers

Friday, December 20, 2013

Natalie Abreu, a single mother of three, lived in a homeless shelter in the Bronx, while commuting to her job as a cleaner at a casino in Queens. Her story helped sway an arbitrator into drastically increases wages for her and her coworkers.

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WNYC News

Judge Rules a New Wage Law Invalid

Monday, August 05, 2013

In a victory for Mayor Bloomberg, a state supreme court judge has deemed a so-called Prevailing Wage Law invalid. After overriding a mayoral veto, the law was passed by the city council in the spring of 2012. Bloomberg sued to stop it from going forward.

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The Brian Lehrer Show

Fast Item #5: Fast Food Workers

Friday, June 28, 2013

There are 50,000 fast food workers in New York City, and the new Fast Food Forward coalition is petitioning for higher and more stable wages. Joseph Barrera, who works at KFC, testified before the City Council yesterday -- he discusses his life behind the counter.

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The Brian Lehrer Show

Planet Money on Disability

Wednesday, March 27, 2013

Chana Joffe-Walt, reporter for NPR's Planet Money, discusses her This American Life piece  on the rise in the number of people on disability.

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WNYC News

Mayor Will Sue After Council Overrides ‘Living Wage’ Veto

Friday, June 29, 2012

Mayor Michael Bloomberg called the City’s Council’s overriding of his living wage bill veto “predictable” – saying Friday he plans to sue.

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The Empire

As Expected, City Council Passes Living Wage Bill by Wide Margin

Monday, April 30, 2012

After months of citywide debate, amended bills and two lengthy legislative hearings, city council members officially passed the so-called living wage bill by a 45 to 5 vote. But not before one final bit of drama.

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WNYC News

Look | What Is a Living Wage in New York City?

Monday, April 30, 2012

The city council is expected to pass a living wage bill Monday. The measure would require some developers doing city-subsidized projects, to pay their workers at least $10 an hour, plus benefits.

What do you think is a livable wage for NYC?

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The Empire

Mayor Vetoes Prevailing Wage Bill

Wednesday, April 25, 2012

As expected, Mayor Bloomberg vetoed the "prevailing wage" bill passed by the City Council last month. And he declared his intent to veto the so-called living wage bill that will likely pass the City Council next week. The City Council, meanwhile, says it will override the mayor's vetoes on both counts.

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The Empire

Quinn Might (Or Might Not) Still Have One Biz Group's Support for Living Wage

Friday, April 13, 2012

This week, the Partnership for New York City, a prominent business group pulled its support for City Council Speaker Christine Quinn's living wage bill. The group and the speaker evidently didn't see eye-to-eye on granting the mayor latitude (known as an "executive waiver") to exempt some projects from the higher wage requirement.

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The Brian Lehrer Show

Revised Living Wage Bill

Friday, January 20, 2012

Letitia James, City Council Member from District 35 in Brooklyn, discusses the living wage bill, paid sick leave and other City Council issues. 

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The Empire

Council Speaker Quinn announces living wage bill

Friday, January 13, 2012

Below are the Speaker's remarks announcing the agreement. Additional reactions are included after:

For the past year, we have had a debate in the City Council about how to bring more jobs to New York in a way that raises salaries and does not stagnate job growth.

Some have said we should do that by letting the market run its course. Some have said that we should do it by replicating what many major cities in America have done: place a wage requirement on any jobs that are developed through public subsidies. Others have said we should go a step further and put that same requirement on tenants of developments that are built with public subsidies.

I want to thank everyone who has offered support, opposition, data, agreement and disagreement on all three of these perspectives. This has been a worthy debate.

There is nothing more important for government right now than the work of creating and retaining the best jobs we can.

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WNYC News

City Council Ends Stalemate Over Living Wage Bill

Friday, January 13, 2012

A City Council stalemate over a so-called living wage bill has ended with a deal that could raise the pay for several hundred workers a year at city-subsidized developments.

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The Empire

Future mayor hopefuls (mostly) criticize Bloomberg's State of the City

Thursday, January 12, 2012

Colby Hamilton / WNYC

After Mayor Michael Bloomberg’s State of the City speech at Morris High School auditorium this afternoon, elected officials began giving their post-speech reaction on the floor of the emptying auditorium. The mayor’s hard-charging education plans, a new chance for developing the Kingsbridge Armory in the Bronx, and the Mayor’s support for a minimum wage increase were at the top of lawmaker’s minds.

Most of the likely mayoral candidates on hand lined up against the Mayor's educational plans. City Council Speaker Christine Quinn was the exception.

“I think the mayor's five point educational plan is very aggressive,” said Quinn. Education dominated the speech, even as the tone of the Mayor’s speech also turned aggressive towards the teacher’s union. The Speaker went on to say that it's clear this will be a "signature issue over the next 12 months."

Public Advocate Bill de Blasio saw the Mayor’s aggressiveness towards teachers was more like picking a fight.

“A lot of the content he raised was worth looking at and talking about,” de Blasio said. “It’s right to talk about how we make evaluations better, how we make the tenure system better. But why not talk about doing it cooperatively?”

Comptroller John Liu also took issue with the Mayor’s tone towards teachers.

“It was apt that he spent such a large amount of time at the beginning talking about the challenges we still face in our public schools,” Liu said. “[It was] somewhat surprising he spent a good deal of time criticizing teachers and almost throwing down the gauntlet against our teachers.”

The mayor’s education comments weren’t the only hot topics after the speech. Manhattan Borough President Scott Stringer said the Mayor’s support of a state proposal to increase the minimum wage was a step in the right direction.

“The minimum wage proposal is not enough to solve the problems of working families in New York City, but it's a good start,” Stringer said. The minimum wage support and the restart of plans for the Kingsbridge Armory left some with the impression the Mayor was undercutting arguments in the living wage fight. The Borough President said he hoped that wasn’t the case.

“I hope this is a larger strategy to give relief to working people in this city,” Stringer said. “There has to be much more of a concerted effort to deal with the fundamental issues impacting working people.”

Another Borough President, Bronx BP Ruben Diaz, Jr., who had been central to the living wage fight that scuttled the first Kingsbridge development plan, said he didn’t see, nor support, a Kingsbridge proposal that didn’t contain a living wage.

“If you're a developer and you know of the history of the Armory, are you really going to put in a proposal on this [request for proposal] without a living wage,” Diaz asked. “It probably wouldn't be the smartest thing to do."

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The Empire

De Blasio makes his move on living wage in New York City

Monday, December 19, 2011

Updated with additional statements below.

Colby Hamilton/WNYC

As the New York Times reported today, Public Advocate Bill de Blasio has thrown his support behind the contentious living wage bill sitting stalled in the City Council. In a letter to City Council Speaker Christine Quinn and Mayor Michael Bloomberg, de Blasio said the legislation was need because "we have not done enough to grow the prospects of all New Yorkers."

"Our city is in the midst of a prolonged economic crisis that has battered the middle class, driven down wages and led to unacceptably high rates of unemployment. Underlying these problems is a rising income inequality that threatens our social fabric and economic future," de Blasio said in the letter. "New York City must move aggressively to address rising income inequality—and I firmly believe that the Living Wage bill represents one of the most immediate and important steps our City can take to do this."

The move puts de Blasio on firm ground in the debate over the bill--and on the side of labor, whose backing he courts in the coming mayoral race--while further boxing in Speaker Quinn, who has not taken a position on the bill. However, the legislation cannot move to the floor without her consent, where it will likely pass. The Speaker has positioned herself as the candidate friendly to business interests in the city, which observers believe are pressuring her to keep the bill from becoming law.

Political consultant Michael Tobman, of the New York City-based firm Hudson TG, saw the letter reflecting three current political realities in the early stages of the 2013 mayoral battle.

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The Empire

NYC voters support the living wage bill

Wednesday, December 14, 2011

On more quick Quinnipiac poll finding.

By a ratio of nearly 3-to-1, voters across all political affiliations support the passage of the living wage bill that's been proposed in the City Council.

"True to its image as a liberal town, New York gives big support to the City Council plan to require a 'Living Wage' by companies that do business with the city. Does the government have an obligation to mandate a living wage?  Overwhelmingly, voters say yes,” said Maurice Carroll, director of the Quinnipiac University Polling Institute, in the release about the poll.

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