Streams

 

Literature

Radiolab

Why we fall into a good book

Wednesday, November 14, 2012

Writer Jonathan Gottschall explores why the real world falls away when we hear a good story... 

Read More

Comments [3]

The Leonard Lopate Show

Walter Murch on the Work of Curzio Malaparte

Monday, November 12, 2012

Film editor Walter Murch, discusses translating the work of Curzio Malaparte, an Italian of German heritage who was a journalist, dramatic, novelist and diplomat whose writing attacked totalitarianism and Hitler’s reign. As a correspondent for Corriere della Sera, the Milan daily, he wrote dispatches of the war in the early 1940s that were suppressed by the Italian government, but reverberated among readers. Murch translated and adapted Malaparte into prose or blank verse poems in The Bird that Swallowed Its Cage; The Selected Writings of Curzio Malaparte.

Comments [2]

Annotations: The NEH Preservation Project

Inspiration Strikes After Tragedy: Alfred Kazin on His New Yorker Trilogy

Friday, November 02, 2012

WNYC

Starting Out in the Thirties (1965), the second installment of Kazin's New Yorker Trilogy, had just been published when he gave this brief talk on the genesis of his artistic motivation at a 1965 Books and Authors Luncheon.

Read More

Comment

The Leonard Lopate Show

Nick Hornby on the Reading Life

Monday, October 22, 2012

Nick Hornby talks about his popular column in the Believer magazine, which chronicles the books he’s read, bought, skimmed, and meant to read. His new book of essays, More Baths Less Talking, is about his encounters with the reading life.

Comments [9]

The Brian Lehrer Show

New Season: Books

Wednesday, October 17, 2012

James Hannaham, Village Voice book reviewer and author of God Says Noshares what books he's looking forward to this fall.

 

Comment

The Leonard Lopate Show

Karl Ove Knausgaard on My Struggle

Friday, September 21, 2012

Norwegian novelist Karl Ove Knausgaard discusses his book My Struggle. Almost ten years have passed since Karl O. Knausgaard's father drank himself to death, and Knausgaard probes into his past, dissecting struggles—great and small—with great candor and vitality.

Comments [5]

The Leonard Lopate Show

Michael Chabon's Telegraph Avenue

Monday, September 17, 2012

Michael Chabon talks about his latest novel, Telegraph Avenue. Set in 2004, the story centers on longtime friends, bandmates, and co-regents of Brokeland Records located in the borderlands of Berkeley and Oakland, and their wives, who are semi-legendary Berkeley midwives. Their businesses, professional existence, and friendships are tested.

Comments [2]

The Leonard Lopate Show

Henry James and His American Masterpiece

Thursday, September 06, 2012

Literary critic Michael Gorra discusses his biography of Henry James told through the lens of his greatest novel, Portrait of a Lady. In Portrait of a Novel: Henry James and the Making of an American Masterpiece tells how Portrait of a Lady—the scandalous story of the expatriate American heiress Isabel Archer—came to be written in the first place, sheds new light on James’s family, the European literary circles in which he made his name.

Comments [5]

Schoolbook

Never Mind Algebra. Is Literature Necessary?

Wednesday, August 15, 2012

In an opinion post in response to a recent New York Times essay, a city English teacher writes: "If algebra can be tossed by the wayside, why not Austen?" And he laments, that is already happening. "Bit by bit, the body of English language instruction has been dismembered over the last 15 years or so."

Read More

Comments [1]

Annotations: The NEH Preservation Project

Gore Vidal's Historical Novel 'Julian' and Its Modern Parallels

Wednesday, August 01, 2012

WNYC

"I can talk for an hour without notes, but for 15 minutes, I have to read it. I shall look up occasionally to give an air of spontaneity." Thus, Gore Vidal begins one of his customarily suave and witty speeches, this one delivered at a Books and Authors Luncheon held on November 30, 1964.

Read More

Comment

The Takeaway

Remembering Gore Vidal

Wednesday, August 01, 2012

Few embraced their place in American culture with such passion and relish. Gore Vidal was the ultimate man of letters who once said "There is no human problem which could not be solved if people would simply do as I advise."

Comments [6]

The Brian Lehrer Show

Novel Politics

Tuesday, July 31, 2012

Political strategist Bridget Siegel talks about her new book, Domestic Affairs: A Campaign Novel, in which she translates her experience on past campaigns (including Obama/Biden, Hillary Clinton, Kerry/Edwards, and Andrew Cuomo) into the realm of fiction.

Comments [8]

The Takeaway

The 47 Endings to 'A Farewell to Arms'

Monday, July 23, 2012

Earlier this month, Scribner released a new edition of 'A Farewell to Arms' with 47 different endings. We tend to think of the classics as untouched relics, but is revisiting Hemingway's artistic process a useful look at the iconic writer's legacy?

Comments [1]

The Takeaway

Poet Laureate Natasha Trethewey: Why I Write

Friday, July 06, 2012

Natasha Trethewey is the first African American to hold the title of Poet Laureate since Rita Dove in 1993. She will assume the post in September and will divide her time between Decatur, Georgia and Washington, D.C.

Comments [4]

The Leonard Lopate Show

On an Irish Island

Monday, July 02, 2012

Robert Kanigel tells the story of Great Blasket, an island off the west coast of Ireland renowned during the early 20th century for the rich communal life of its residents and the unadulterated Irish they spoke. With the Irish language vanishing all through the rest of Ireland, the Great Blasket became a magnet for scholars and writers drawn there during the Gaelic renaissance. On an Irish Island is a love letter to a vanished way of life.

Comments [8]

The Takeaway

Remembering Nora Ephron

Wednesday, June 27, 2012

A friend looks back on the life and legacy of Nora Ephron, novelist, playwright, Oscar-nominated screenwriter and movie director.

 

Comments [2]

The Takeaway

The Books that Shaped America

Monday, June 25, 2012

It's the ultimate summer reading list: the Library of Congress has announced a list of the 88 "Books That Shaped America," an eclectic mix of literature that has contributed to the American conversation over the years.

Comments [23]

The Takeaway

Listeners Respond: What books have shaped you as an American?

Monday, June 25, 2012

Today on the show we asked our listeners: "What books have shaped you as an American?" We got some great responses.

Read More

Comment

The Truth

Human Intelligence

Wednesday, June 20, 2012

Written by Kurt Andersen, this story was originally heard on PRI's Studio 360. Narrated by Ed Herbstman, with John Ottavino as Nicholas, and Melanie Hoopes as Nancy. The story editor was David Krasnow. Produced and directed by Jonathan...

Comment

The Brian Lehrer Show

Living, Thinking, Looking: Essays by Siri Hustvedt

Tuesday, June 12, 2012

Acclaimed novelist and essayist Siri Hustvedt will discuss Living, Thinking, Looking: Essays, her new collection of meditations on philosophy, psychology, neuroscience, literature and psychoanalysis.

→ EVENT: Siri Hustvedt in conversation with Paul Auster at The Strand, Thursday, June 14, 7:00-8:00pm

→ EVENT: Reading, Q&A, and book signing at Community Bookstore (143 Seventh Ave., Brooklyn), Thursday, June 21, 7:00-8:00pm

Comments [5]