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Literature

The Brian Lehrer Show

Gatsby From Afar

Friday, May 17, 2013

Evan Osnos, China correspondent for The New Yorker, talks about what international readers and movie-goers learn about the U.S. from The Great Gatsby. LISTENERS: Did you read The Great Gatsby before moving here? Does what it says about American culture still hold true? Call 212-433-9692, or leave a comment here. 

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The Takeaway

American Sentenced in North Korea, Isabella Rossellini's 'Mammas', Cleveland's Puerto Rican Community Reacts to Kidnappings

Friday, May 10, 2013

Massachusetts Governor Deval Patrick on the Boston Marathon Attack and Investigation | Cleveland's Puerto Rican Community Reacts to Kidnappings | American Sentenced in North Korea | Movie Date: 'Peeples' and 'The Great Gatsby' | The Drama and Lasting Influence of 'The Great Gatsby' | Isabella Rossellini's 'Mammas'

The Leonard Lopate Show

May's Book: F. Scott Fitzgerald's The Great Gatsby

Monday, May 06, 2013

We're broadcasting a discussion recorded in the Jerome L. Greene Performance Space in March. The Leonard Lopate Show Book Club joined the BBC World Book Club for a conversation about The Great Gatsby, by F. Scott Fitzgerald, with writer Jay McInerney and literature professor Anne Margaret Daniel. They answer questions from around the world about what makes The Great Gatsby one of the great classics of 20th-century American literature.

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The Leonard Lopate Show

The Life and Work of David Foster Wallace

Tuesday, April 30, 2013

D. T. Max talks about his biography of David Foster Wallace, one of the most influential writers of his generation. In Every Love Story Is a Ghost Story: A Life of David Foster Wallace, Max charts Wallace’s battle to succeed as a novelist as he fights off depression and addiction to emerge with his masterpiece, Infinite Jest. Since his death by suicide at the age of forty-six in 2008, Wallace has become a symbol of sincerity and honesty in an inauthentic age.

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The Leonard Lopate Show

The Selected Letters of Willa Cather

Monday, April 29, 2013

Andrew Jewell and Janis Stout discuss The Selected Letters of Willa Cather, published for the first time than 65 years after her death. The 566 letters collected here range from funny reports of life in Red Cloud in the 1880s that Cather wrote as a teenager to such letters to luminaries such as Sarah Orne Jewett, Robert Frost, Yehudi Menuhin, Sinclair Lewis, and the president of Czechoslovakia.

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The Takeaway

African Author Chinua Achebe Dies at 82

Friday, March 22, 2013

Chinua Achebe, the famed Nigerian writer, died today at age 82. He was a political figure, an essayist, and a voice of the African experience in the 20th century. His book "Things Fall Apart" started a global conversation that is still going on.

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The Leonard Lopate Show

Tributes: Chinua Achebe

Friday, March 22, 2013

Chinua Achebe was considered by many to be the father of Nigerian -- and modern African -- literature. His novel, Things Fall Apart, which was first published in 1958 and has been translated into 45 languages. Mr. Achebe died earlier today at the age of 82. I had the opportunity to speak with him several times...and you can hear to my 2008 conversation with Chinua Achebe and fellow Nigerian writer Chris Abani below!

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The Takeaway

Fire and Forget: New Stories for New Wars

Friday, March 15, 2013

The legacy of war literature is a rich one. When Matt Gallagher returned from the Iraq War, he discovered he needed to write his own stories. He is co-editor of "Fire and Forget," a new collection of short stories by Iraq and Afghan war veterans, and their family members, on the experience of modern warfare.

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The Brian Lehrer Show

Rising Asia

Tuesday, March 12, 2013

Mohsin Hamid, author of New York Times bestseller, The Reluctant Fundamentalist, talks about his new novel, How to Get Filthy Rich in Rising Asia.

→ Tonight: Mohsin Hamid in conversation with editor Rebecca Saletan at Greenlight bookstore, Starts here at 7:30

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WNYC News

A Seussian Science Symposium

Friday, March 01, 2013

Analyzing some of Doctor Seuss’s most infamous readings
Some lawyers today hoped to find the deeper meanings.

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The Leonard Lopate Show

Guest Picks: Karen Russell

Tuesday, February 19, 2013

Karen Russell was on the Leonard Lopate Show recently to discuss her new collection of short stories, Vampires in the Lemon Grove. She also told us what she's been reading and listening to...and the allure of the "season packet" that comes with Stouffer's stuffing.

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The Leonard Lopate Show

A Life of David Foster Wallace

Wednesday, January 23, 2013

D. T. Max talks about his biography of David Foster Wallace, one of the most influential writers of his generation who not only captivated readers with his prose but also mesmerized them with his brilliant mind. In Every Love Story Is a Ghost Story: A Life of David Foster Wallace, Max charts Wallace’s battle to succeed as a novelist as he fights off depression and addiction to emerge with his masterpiece, Infinite Jest. Since his death by suicide at the age of forty-six in 2008, Wallace has become a symbol of sincerity and honesty in an inauthentic age.

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NYPR Archives & Preservation

Sol Yurick on Reader's Almanac, 1979

Monday, January 07, 2013

WNYC

Sol Yurick discusses his novel The Warriors and its film adaptation.

 


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The Takeaway

Before Les Misérables Returns to the Screen, a Look at its Past

Monday, December 24, 2012

On Christmas Day, Tom Hooper’s film adaptation of Les Misérables will debut in theaters nationwide to the delight of millions of fans. But behind the many adaptations of the story, is Victor Hugo's 1862 novel — a social, political, and literary masterpiece. Patrik Henry Bass, books editor for Essence, discusses the historical and cultural significance of Les Misérables.

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NYPR Archives & Preservation

The Scrappy Wunderkind of the Bronx Projects: Author Richard Price on Reader's Almanac, 1978

Thursday, December 20, 2012

WNYC

In this 1978 episode of Reader's Almanac, host Jack Sullivan interviews Richard Price, 28, on the publication of his third novel, Ladies’ Man.

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The Leonard Lopate Show

Charles Dickens in Love

Tuesday, December 18, 2012

Robert Garnett discusses the author Charles Dickens and the women he loved. When Charles Dickens died in 1870, the first person named in his will turned out to be an unknown woman named Ellen Ternan, whose conspicuous presence in his will was a mystery. She was not the first woman who had fired his imagination. In Charles Dickens in Love, Garnett narrates the story of the most intense romances of Dickens’s life, and shows how his novels reveal his affections and serve as memorials to the young women he loved all too well, if not always wisely.

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Soundcheck

Sophie Auster: Ready For 'Red Weather'

Wednesday, December 12, 2012

New York singer-songwriter Sophie Auster performs songs from her new EP, Red Weather.

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The Leonard Lopate Show

Orhan Pamuk's Silent House

Wednesday, December 12, 2012

Orhan Pamuk talks about his second novel, Silent House, now translated into English for the first time. It tells the story of a Turkish family gathering in the shadow of the impending military coup of 1980, and how the growing political cataclysm issuing from Turkey’s tumultuous century-long struggle for modernity affects the family.

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The Leonard Lopate Show

Exploring The Hobbit

Tuesday, December 04, 2012

Corey Olsen talks about what makes The Hobbit is one of the most widely read and best-loved books of the twentieth century. In Exploring J.R.R. Tolkien’s The Hobbit, he brings a thorough and original new reading of this great work, chapter by chapter, revealing the stories within the story.

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The Takeaway

Is Literature Necessary?

Tuesday, November 27, 2012

The new Common Core State Standards dictate that non-fiction reading should make up 70 percent of a high school senior’s reading curriculum across all disciplines. And so far, 46 states have either adopted these new standards or will be adopting them by next year.

Who came up with these standards? How do they work? And how do parents and teachers feel about them?

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