Streams

 

Literature

The Leonard Lopate Show

Breaking Up, Making Up and Picking Up

Monday, May 19, 2014

Philip Galanes says breaking up with someone by text message is a no-no. He gives advice and answers questions on the best ways to handle breakups. Lexicographer Paul Dickson tells us about the many words we use every day that were invented by writers. And we’ll hear stories from a man who drove a taxi in New York for 30 years.

The Leonard Lopate Show

Words Wrought by Writers

Monday, May 19, 2014

William Shakespeare invented and or popularized many turns of phrase, including bedazzled, hurry, critical, and anchovy. We'll find out about other writers who added to the lexicon.

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The Takeaway

Introducing The Takeaway Book Club

Monday, May 05, 2014

No two book clubs are alike. What makes yours one-of-a-kind? As part of a new reading series, The Takeaway is showcasing unique book clubs from around the country.

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The Leonard Lopate Show

Celebrating Dylan Thomas’s 100th Birthday

Friday, May 02, 2014

President Jimmy Carter, author and activist Kevin Powell, and theater director Charlotte Moore share their remembrances of the poet.

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The Takeaway

Hope Fades in Ukraine Crisis | Do No Harm? A Look at Doctors & the Death Penalty | Introducing The Takeaway Book Club

Friday, May 02, 2014

Kidnapping Tragedy Opens Wounds in Hearts of Nigerians | Introducing The Takeaway Book Club | Hope Fades in Ukraine as Conflict Intensifies | New Movie Reviews of the Week | Why Just One Big Banker Went to Jail for the Financial Crisis | Do No Harm? A Look at Doctors ...

The Takeaway

This Is Where: 'I am Just Feet in the Sand'

Wednesday, April 30, 2014

It's the last day of April, which means it's also the last day of National Poetry Month. Today also marks the end of The Takeaway's month-long poetry series called "This Is Where."

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NYPR Archives & Preservation

Listen to Rare, Beautiful Music from the Robeson Archives

Monday, April 28, 2014

WNYC

Paul Robeson Jr. (November 2, 1927 - April 26, 2014) spent much of his life preserving his father's legacy, and in 1976, he came to the WNYC studios to share rare recordings spanning the performer's influential life and singing career.

Robeson and Folk and Baroque host Dave Sear begin with some of ...

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The Takeaway

This Is Where: Deep in The Woods of East Texas

Wednesday, April 23, 2014

Around the country, Takeaway listeners have been submitting their own poems about places that carry meaning, and among the memorable poems was this one from a listener from Palestine, Texas.

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The Leonard Lopate Show

Shakespeare in America

Tuesday, April 22, 2014

Shakespeare scholar James Shapiro reveals the ways Shakespeare has influenced the United States’ literary heritage. His anthology Shakespeare in America reveals how, for over two centuries, the plays have been a prism through which crucial American issues—revolution, slavery, war, social justice—were debated and understood. American statesmen and presidents from John Adams to Bill Clinton offer their own testimonies to Shakespeare’s profound and enduring influence.

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The Takeaway

This Is Where: 'All Arms Are Open'

Wednesday, April 16, 2014

It's National Poetry month and our friends at WLRN have launched a poetry project they're calling "This Is Where." We've asked you to submit your own poems about places that have had meaning. 

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The Takeaway

This Is Where: 'Children Live & Dreams Die'

Wednesday, April 09, 2014

In collaboration with our friends down in Miami at WLRN, we're collecting poems that include the words, "This is where." You can participate by sending us a poem about a place that matters to you.

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Voices at the New York Public Library

Paul Fussell: The Poetry of Three Wars: World War I, World War II and Vietnam

Wednesday, April 02, 2014

The late Paul Fussell (1924-2012) was a noted cultural and literary historian, who taught at Rutgers and the University of Pennsylvania. He wrote about such diverse subjects as Samuel Johnson, travel, and the American class system. His numerous books include Poetic Meter and Poetic Form, The Great War and Modern Memory (for which he won a National Book Award), and The American Infantry in Northwestern Europe, 1944-45. Fussell was a veteran of World War II, fighting in Europe, where he was wounded and decorated with a Bronze Star and two Purple Hearts.

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The Takeaway

This Is Where: Poems About Places That Matter

Tuesday, April 01, 2014

Think of a place that carries a lot of meaning. Can you put that place into words? Our friends at WLRN in Miami are teaming with O, Miami, a regional poetry festival, to get members of their community to share poems about the places they care about with the hashtag #ThisIsWhere.

Comments [43]

The Takeaway

Never-Published Tennessee Williams Story Surfaces

Tuesday, March 25, 2014

Drunken antics and foiled romance mark Williams’ campus story that sat on a shelf for years. But its new publisher says it showed signs of the genius to come.

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The Takeaway

Literature Offers Lessons For Growing Russian-Ukrainian Crisis

Monday, March 03, 2014

The tensions surrounding Ukraine's relationship with Russia have deep historic origins. Ukraine is a place with a culture and society entirely distinct from that of Russia, and yet one that was intimately familiar. Nowhere is this more evident than the literature of the region. Nikolai Gogol, regarded by many as the “father of Russian literature,” was actually born in what is today part of Ukraine. Anne Lounsbery, Chair of Russian and Slavic Studies at New York University, tells The Takeaway what Gogol’s life and writing have to teach us about Russia and Ukraine.

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New Tech City

Inside the Mind that Translated Moby Dick Into Emoji

Thursday, February 27, 2014

There is no white whale Emoji character. But that's just part of the fun (and art) of Emoji Dick.

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NYPR Archives & Preservation

Vonnegut on Deadeye Dick, a Story of "Gun Nuts and Nukes"

Wednesday, January 22, 2014

In this archival interview, the famed author defends his fiction against critics who to pan his writing, comparing his detractors to “circus geeks” who “bite the heads off chickens for the amusement of the rubes who walk by.”

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The New Yorker: Out Loud

Rebecca Mead and Daniel Zalewski on gender and literature.

Monday, January 13, 2014

Rebecca Mead and Daniel Zalewski on gender and literature.

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WNYC News

Newark Poet, Playwright Amiri Baraka Dies at 79

Thursday, January 09, 2014

Named New Jersey's Poet Laureate in 2002, Baraka was known for his powerful manifestos, from the racial fury of "Dutchman," to the September 11 diatribe "Somebody Blew Up America."

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The Brian Lehrer Show

Universal Pre-K; International Risks; Defending DOMA; Children's Lit

Tuesday, January 07, 2014

Capital Tonight host Liz Benjamin and NY1's Grace Rauh discuss the showdown between Mayor de Blasio and Governor Cuomo over universal Pre-K. Ian Bremmer, president of political risk research and consulting firm Eurasia Group, predicts the biggest international risks ahead in 2014. Roberta Kaplan explains her role in the Supreme Court DOMA decision. Plus: author Kate DiCamillo talks about her new post as ambassador for young people's literature.