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Literarure

Dubliners: A Quartet

Dubliners: A Quartet - Part 1: Araby

Wednesday, August 06, 2014

Part one of the four-part audio play by award-winning playwright Arthur Yorinks, inspired by the stories of James Joyce's Dubliners.

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The Leonard Lopate Show

James Joyce's Ulysses: 'Obscene, Lewd, and Lascivious'

Monday, June 16, 2014

The book that literary critics now consider the most important novel in the English language was once illegal to own, sell, advertise or purchase in most of the English-speaking world. But James Joyce, publishers, and other authors fought for the freedom to publish it.

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NYPR Archives & Preservation

Nicholas Pileggi, The Mafia in New York City

Thursday, April 24, 2014

In a one-hour talk that has the easy-going feel of a conversation in a diner, Nicholas Pileggi provides an account of how the Mafia came to power in New York City. 

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NYPR Archives & Preservation

Kurt Vonnegut on Jailbird, His Watergate Novel

Thursday, December 26, 2013

Kurt Vonnegut tells us why he abandoned the sketchy sci-fi plot lines in favor of a sharp-eyed political realism of what has come to be known as his “Watergate novel,” Jailbird.
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NYPR Archives & Preservation

Kurt Vonnegut and L.J. Davis and the Novelist's Relationship to Community

Thursday, December 19, 2013

This May 1, 1978 interview was the third Vonnegut had with Walter James Miller.
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The Takeaway

Alice Munro Wins Nobel Prize in Literature

Thursday, October 10, 2013

On Thursday morning, the Swedish Academy named Canadian Alice Munro as the winner of the Nobel Prize in literature. Not a stylist nor a writer of experimental fiction, Munro is a self described old fashioned storyteller. Her disciples and fellow writers describe her as creating small worlds that convey addictive wisdom. Radhika Jones, executive editor at TIME magazine, explains the significance of this choice.

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WNYC News

Bus Tour Brings Philip Roth's Newark to Life

Wednesday, March 20, 2013

WNYC

It’s a curious way to celebrate a famous writer’s 80th birthday: go back to the city of his youth and read excerpts from his books.

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WNYC News

Philip Roth and Fans Return to Newark for his 80th

Monday, March 18, 2013

Philip Roth fans and scholars from across the country are descending on Newark this week for several activities honoring the city's most famous literary son on the occasion of his 80th birthday.

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NYPR Archives & Preservation

Monte Irvin and Recollections on Negro League Baseball

Tuesday, February 05, 2013

WNYC

Hall-of-famer Monte Irvin talks about his time in baseball during a round table discussion led by host Walter James Miller.

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The Brian Lehrer Show

The Open Utopia

Tuesday, October 16, 2012

Stephen Duncombe, associate professor at NYU's Gallatin School of Individualized Study, talks about his project to create a web-based, open source edition of Sir Thomas More's Utopia.

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Radiolab

Why Isn't the Sky Blue?

Monday, May 21, 2012

What is the color of honey, and "faces pale with fear"? If you're Homer--one of the most influential poets in human history--that color is green. And the sea is "wine-dark," just like oxen...though sheep are violet. Which all sounds...well, really off. Producer Tim Howard introduces us to linguist Guy Deutscher, ...

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The Leonard Lopate Show

Tolstoy: A Russian Life

Friday, December 02, 2011

Rosamund Bartlett talks about the life and legacy of Leo Tolstoy. At the time of his death, he was the most famous man in Russia, with a growing international following, and more revered than the tsar. Bartlett’s biography, Tolstoy: A Russian Life is a portrait of the brilliant, maddening, and contrary man who made a lasting impression on literature and culture.

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