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Libya

The Takeaway

Libya: Rebels Advance on Gadhafi Loyalist Strongholds

Monday, September 19, 2011

Though Col. Moammar Gadhafi remains in hiding, two Libyan towns loyal to the deposed leader are holding out against rebel forces. Libya's interim government, the NTC, said forces had made advances Sirte, Bani Walid, and several other small towns loyal to Gadhafi. Peter Biles, correspondent for the BBC, filed this report from Bani Walid.

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The Takeaway

Top of the Hour: Cameron and Sarkozy Visit Tripoli, Morning Headlines

Thursday, September 15, 2011

French President Nicolas Sarkozy and British Prime Minister David Cameron arrived in Tripoli this morning, becoming the most senior Western leaders to visit Libya since Col. Moammar Gadhafi fled in August. Nour Ajaj, a hotel worker in Tripoli, reacts to the visit.

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The Takeaway

Saddi Gadhafi Flees to Niger

Monday, September 12, 2011

Saadi Gadhafi, one of Col. Moammar Gadhafi's sons, has fled from Libya to Niger. The defection comes a week after a dozen top officials from the Gadhafi regime crossed into Niger, leading some to speculate that Col. Gadhafi may have fled there. The BBC's Thomas Fessy reports from Niamey, Niger about what these high profile defections mean for a new Libya and their West African neighbors.

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The Takeaway

Gadhafi Loyalists Flee to Niger

Tuesday, September 06, 2011

A convoy of over 200 vehicles believed to be carrying loyalists to Col. Moammar Gadhafi crossed Libya's southern border into Niger on Tuesday. The loyalists are thought to be heading to Burkina Faso, which has offered the fugitive Libyan leader asylum. A spokesman for Gadhafi said he remains in Libya. Questions have arisen as to why NATO would allow the convoy to escape. Rebel negotiators are pressing loyalists in Bani Walid to surrender peacefully by Saturday.

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The Takeaway

Libyan Rebels Extend Surrender Deadline for Sirte

Tuesday, September 06, 2011

Fighters in Libya are giving loyalists in Sirte, the birthplace of Col. Moammar Gadhafi, until this weekend to surrender. Meanwhile, A convoy of over 200 vehicles believed to be carrying loyalists to Col. Moammar Gadhafi crossed Libya's southern border into Niger on Tuesday. BBC correspondent Paul Wood filed this report while on the road to Sirte.

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The Takeaway

Armed Libyan Convoy Enters Niger

Tuesday, September 06, 2011

An armed convoy believed to be carrying loyalists to Col. Moammar Gadhafi crossed the Libyan border into Niger late on Monday. It is unclear whether the fugitive Libyan leader or his family were in the convoy. The loyalists may be heading to Burkina Faso, which has offered asylum to Gadhafi. The BBC's Jon Leyne, who is in Benghazi, says it would have been impossible for such a large convoy to leave Libya without NATO turning a blind eye.

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The Brian Lehrer Show

The Libyan Ambassador: The Latest from Tripoli

Tuesday, September 06, 2011

Ali Suleiman Aujali, Ambassador to the U.S. for Libya's National Transitional Council talks about the latest from Tripoli, the search for Qaddafi and what kind of support- financial and otherwise- the rebels are getting in Libya.

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The Takeaway

This Week's Agenda: 9/11, Economy, Libya

Monday, September 05, 2011

It's Monday, so we're discussing news ahead for the week. Next Sunday will be ten years since the 9/11 attacks. This will be a week of reflection — not just for Americans but for everyone around the world. As we remember 9/11, many Americans are still without jobs and struggling to make ends meet. Charlie Herman, business and economics editor for WNYC and The Takeaway, says not to expect anything game-changing from Federal Reserve Chairman Ben Bernanke's speech this Thursday in Minnesota on the economic outlook. His speech will be followed by President Barack Obama's jobs speech. And across the Atlantic, Dominique Strauss-Kahn returned to France over the weekend, and the hunt for Col. Muammar Gadhafi continues in Libya.

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The Takeaway

Papers Uncovered in Gadhafi Compound Show UK, US Rendition Operation

Monday, September 05, 2011

As Libyan rebels continue their hunt for Moammar Gadhafi, the military commander of the anti-Gaddafi forces in Tripoli says he wants and apology from the United States and the United Kingdom. The commander, Abdel Hakijm Belhaj, says he was tortured after being arrested in Bangkok in 2004 as a terrorism suspect, then transferred by the CIA and British intelligence agencies to a prison in Libya. A CIA document recently uncovered in Gadhafi's Tripoli compound shows "that the British and Libyans worked together to arrange for a terrorism suspect to be removed from Hong Kong to Tripoli – along with his wife and children – despite the risk that they would be tortured," according to The Guardian.

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World Weekly with Gideon Rachman

Libya, the eurozone, and anti-corruption in India

Thursday, September 01, 2011

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The Takeaway

World Leaders Meet in Paris for Libya Summit

Thursday, September 01, 2011

French President Nicolas Sarkozy and British Prime Minister David Cameron are hosting Libya's National Transitional Council (NTC) at a summit with world leaders in Paris today. Secretary of State Hillary Clinton is in attendance, as are representatives from China and Russia. The NTC, Libya's transitional government, is expected to ask for international aid for providing security and request that Libyan assets in foreign banks be unfrozen.

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The Takeaway

Tripoli's Drinking Water Problem

Thursday, September 01, 2011

Today, French President Nicolas Sarkozy and British Prime Minister David Cameron are co-hosting a "friends of Libya" meeting in Paris. On the docket is how to help the National Transitional Council the future of Libya. One of the problems that will need sorting out quickly is the lack of drinking water in Tripoli. The BBC's Kevin Connolly filed this report.

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The Takeaway

What Does It Take for a Dictator to Surrender?

Thursday, September 01, 2011

Rebels in Libya continue to struggle with each other over who will control the country, and with Moammar Gadhafi's loyalists, who rejected their offer for the missing leader to surrender. Meanwhile, nearly two weeks over rebels took over Tripoli, Gadhafi remains separated from his wife and two children, who fled to Algeria earlier this week. What will it take for Gadhafi to step down?

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The Takeaway

Beyond Libya: Assessing NATO's Strengths and Weaknesses

Wednesday, August 31, 2011

Yesterday, NATO spokesman Col. Roland Lavoie announced that, "despite the remnants of the regime, the Tripoli region is essentially freed." While the NATO mission to take out the Gadhafi regime does seem to be largely a success, some critics are pointing out the many problems that arose with the NATO mission in Libya — problems that may be indicative of larger issues within NATO that need to be addressed.

 

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The Takeaway

An American Imprisoned in Gadhafi's Tripoli

Wednesday, August 31, 2011

It sounds like the script of a movie, but the story of how American Matthew VanDyke ended up in the hands of the Gadhafi regime is very real. VanDyke traveled to Libya to help friends living there just as the war broke out between the rebels and the loyalists. He was captured in Brega, hit over the head and awoke in a prison cell. He was placed in solitary confinement twice, for 85 and then 76 days, before essentially escaping on August 24.

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The Takeaway

Gadhafi Still Missing, Libya Moves On

Tuesday, August 30, 2011

Libyan rebel leaders have rejected the prospect of having United Nations peacekeepers aid in the transition to a new government, according to top UN officials. The rebels also continue to search for Moammar Gadhafi, as Gadhafi's wife and three children fled to Algeria yesterday. The rebels are also facing growing pressure to provide basic services to the Libyan people, like water and electricity, in advance of actually organizing a transitional government.

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The Takeaway

Does Algeria's Government Know Gadhafi's Whereabouts?

Tuesday, August 30, 2011

As rebels in Libya continued their search for Col. Moammar Gadhafi yesterday, Algerian officials announced that Gadhafi's wife and three sons had crossed the border from Libya, and are now hiding out there. More countries are continuing to recognize the new Libyan government — except for Algeria, which remains the only North African neighbor not to address Libya as such.

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The Takeaway

Human Rights Concerns in Libya

Monday, August 29, 2011

As the Gadhafi regime falls questions still remain about the state of Libya and the future ahead. Where is Moammar Gadhafi, anyway? And what will happen to his loyal supporters? Also, we have been hearing reports of human right atrocities that are coming to light now that the regime of Gadhafi is coming to a close. The AP is reorting that more than 10,000 from Moammar Gadhafi's prisons have been freed since the rebels entered Tripoli last week. In such a chaotic and unstable situation, information can be hard to verify.

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The Takeaway

A Radio Revolution in Libya

Monday, August 29, 2011

As the revolution continues in Libya, independent radio stations have begun broadcasting in Benghazi and Tripoli, and the practice is becoming more popular. Without state censors watching their every move, broadcasters are free to spread their message far and wide. Our partner the BBC has been monitoring this and brings us this report on what role the radio is playing in revolutionary Libya.

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The Takeaway

Senator Cardin on the US Role in Libya

Friday, August 26, 2011

Yesterday the United Nations Security Council reached an agreement to release $1.5 billion in frozen Libyan assets, to help meet humanitarian needs for civilians there. The State Department is assuring the American people that money will not fall into the wrong hands. Libyan rebels are continuing their search for Moammar Gadhafi, with the help of NATO. But what will the U.S.'s role be in Libya's transition to a democracy?

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