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Libya

Gabfest Radio

Gabfest Radio: The Bringing a Gun to a Puppy Fight Edition

Saturday, September 15, 2012

On this week’s episode of Gabfest Radio from Slate and WNYC, Political Gabfest panelists Emily Bazelon, John Dickerson, and David Plotz discuss the turmoil in the Arab world. On the Culture Gabfest portion of the show, John Dickerson returns to talk about his great passion, Bob Dylan, who has a new album out.

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The New Yorker: Political Scene

Steve Coll, Jon Lee Anderson, and Ryan Lizza on the embassy attacks in the Middle East.

Friday, September 14, 2012

Steve Coll, Jon Lee Anderson, and Ryan Lizza on the embassy attacks in the Middle East.

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Slate Political Gabfest

Slate: The Teeny Little Bounce Gabfest

Friday, September 14, 2012

Slate's Political Gabfest, featuring David Plotz, John Dickerson and Emily Bazelon. This week: An embassy breach, a modest bounce and a union battle.

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The Takeaway

White House Says Attack in Libya May Have Been Planned

Thursday, September 13, 2012

The United States has vowed to track down those behind the attacks in Benghazi that killed American Ambassador Chris Stevens and left three other diplomatic personnel dead. Speaking from the Rose Garden on Wednesday, President Obama told the American people that these acts of violence will not pass without an appropriate response.

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It's A Free Blog

Opinion: How Libya Will Affect the 2012 Election

Wednesday, September 12, 2012

While 9/11 was off-limits for campaign politics, the murder of Americans in Libya was not.

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The Takeaway

Consulate in Libya Attacked

Wednesday, September 12, 2012

Libyan Ambassador Christopher Stevens died in an attack on the American Consulate in Benghazi, Libya after protests broke out there and in Cairo. Three other American diplomatic staff members were also killed. President Obama strongly condemned the attack earlier this morning.

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The Brian Lehrer Show

Embassy Attacks in Libya and Egypt

Wednesday, September 12, 2012

Gideon Rose, editor of Foreign Affairs Magazine and author of How Wars End: Why We Always Fight the Last Battle, talks about the attacks on U.S. embassies in Libya and Egypt, the death of Ambassador Chris Stevens, and how the violence has become part of the back-and-forth from campaigns overnight.

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It's A Free Country ®

Watch and Read Statement: President Obama Addresses Libya Tragedy

Wednesday, September 12, 2012

President Obama strongly condemned the attack on the American embassy in Benghazi, Libya, which killed four Americans. Watch the statement below and read and read the president's official statement on the attacks.

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The Takeaway

U.S. Ambassador to Libya Killed in Attack

Wednesday, September 12, 2012

Protesters gathered to express their anger over a film that they say ridicules and insults the Prophet Muhammad. Ambassador Chris Stevens was killed Tuesday night when he and a group of embassy employees went to the consulate to try to get his team out of the building after the protest turned violent.

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It's A Free Blog

Opinion: Libya Tragedy Reminder of Foreign Policy in 2012 Race

Wednesday, September 12, 2012

These aren't areas where candidates can rail against each other because they aren't topics that can be resolved with an easily chant-able slogan.  So it's safer for both sides to leave them out of the debates.

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On The Media

Connecting Through a Revolution

Friday, August 24, 2012

One year ago this week, Libyan rebels took control of the capital city Tripoli, ending the 42-year rule of Muammar al-Qaddafi. When the Libyan uprising began in February of 2011, OTM producer Sarah Abdurrahman told us about Feb17voices, a project she was involved in to get information out of Libya during a media blackout. Last month, Sarah went to Tripoli to witness Libya's election and to meet the people behind the voices.

The song from this segment has no English title.  Here it is in Arabic: 


تعلى في العالي 

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The Takeaway

American Former POW and Libyan Resistance Fighter on Saturday's National Election

Monday, July 09, 2012

Over the weekend Libyans voted in the first free national elections since the demise of dictator Colonel Moammar Gaddafi. During all the changes and turmoil in Libya last year, there's one guest we interviewed a number of times on the show: Matthew VanDyke. Last year, VanDyke was captured by Gaddafi loyalists in Libya and held in solitary confinement for about six months before he escaped. VanDyke eventually came home, but he never lost his love for Libya or the Libyan people.

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The Brian Lehrer Show

David Sanger on Iran, Syria, More

Monday, July 09, 2012

Chief Washington correspondent for the New York Times and WNYC contributor David Sanger talks about the latest on the diplomatic relationship with Iran, the effects of economic sanctions and their impact on the oil markets. Plus the latest from Syria, Libya, and more.

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The Takeaway

Libyans Elect Officials for the First Time in Four Decades

Monday, July 09, 2012

Libyans voted on Saturday morning in the first election in four decades under Colonel Muammar el-Qaddafi. By Sunday evening, returns showed liberals in the lead. This means that unlike Egypt to the east and Tunisia to the north, a displaced dictator will not be replaced by Islamists.

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The Leonard Lopate Show

Libya in the Time of Revolution

Tuesday, June 05, 2012

British international correspondent Lindsey Hilsum chronicles the personal stories of people living through a time of unprecedented danger and opportunity in Libya—from the start of the revolution on the ground to the toppling of Gaddafi’s regime and his savage death in the desert. In Sandstorm: Libya in the Time of Revolution, she tells the full story of the events of the revolution within the context of Libya’s history of colonialism, monarchy and dictatorship, and explores what the future of Libya holds.

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The Takeaway

Lockerbie Bomber Dies at 60

Monday, May 21, 2012

Abdelbaset al-Megrahi, the only person convicted in the 1988 Lockerbie bombing which killed 270 people, including 189 Americans, died yesterday in Libya, at the age of 60. His death comes nearly three years after Scotland released him from prison on humanitarian grounds, and eleven years his conviction for planting a bomb on Pan Am Flight 103 in December 1988. John Ashton is Megrahi’s biographer and the author of "Megrahi: You Are My Jury," and Eileen Monetti's 20-year-old son Rick was returning from an academic semester abroad on Pan Am 103.

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On The Media

A New (Troubling) Speech Law in Libya

Friday, May 18, 2012

With the first Libyan elections in 40 years just a month away, the shadow of the Gaddafi regime looms large. The National Transitional Council (which holds power in Libya until those elections) recently passed a law that criminalizes glorifying Gaddafi as well as offending the revolution. Bob speaks with Libya Herald editor Sami Zaptia about the implications of the law for speech in Libya.

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On The Media

Reporters Unwittingly Exposing Sources

Friday, April 27, 2012

Journalists have become increasingly reliant on digital technology in their work, but weak or nonexistent digital security measures open their sources to risk of exposure. Brooke speaks to journalist Matthieu Aikins about the need for reporters to take more precautions to protect their digital information, especially in conflict areas.

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The Takeaway

How Have Iraq and Libya Changed US Foreign Policy?

Monday, March 19, 2012

The debate over whether to intervene in Syria continues, and many questions remain. What role would the U.S. play in an intervention? How should Americans engage the international community? Should we arm the Syrian opposition? 

Today we have the opportunity to reflect on the U.S.’s role in two recent conflicts. One year ago today, the American troops joined their French and British counterparts on the battlefield in Libya. Nine years ago today, the U.S. launched Operation Iraqi Freedom. What have we learned from these conflicts, and how do they inform U.S. foreign policy today? 

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The Takeaway

Women's Rights in Libya One Year After the Revolution

Wednesday, February 15, 2012

After Ben-Ali fled Tunisia, and Mubarak ran from Egypt, the Libyan revolution began in Benghazi and then traveled east, to Tripoli. After an intense civil war bolstered by international support, Moammar Gadhafi’s 40-year reign finally ended last October in his hometown of Sirte. As Libyans celebrate the anniversary of their revolution, the state of their government is still in flux, and the role of women in Libyan civic life is particularly uncertain.

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