Streams

 

Libya

The Takeaway

This Week's Agenda: Budget, Middle East, Jobs

Monday, February 28, 2011

The government is on the verge of a shutdown Friday, as Democrats and Republicans try and come up with some kind of resolution on the budget. Chrystia Freeland, global editor-at-large of Reuters, and Charlie Herman, economics editor for The Takeaway and WNYC Radio, will look into their chrystal balls and see if any resolution is in sight. While Washington makes attempts at a budget resolution, Secretary of State Hillary Clinton is heading to Switzherland to come up with a resolution on dealing with Col. Moammar el-Gadhafi and Libya. Are Gadhafi's days numbered? 

Comments [1]

The Takeaway

Latest From Libya: Rebels Close in on Gadhafi

Monday, February 28, 2011

Marie Colvin, foreign affairs correspondent for the Sunday Times, reports live from Tripoli, where rebel forces are closing in on strongman leader Col. Moammar Gadhafi. Meanwhile, there are reports surfacing that Gadhafi's government is no longer in control of the nation's oil and gas fields.

Comment

The Takeaway

Diplomatic Pressure Tries to Force Gaddafi to Quit

Monday, February 28, 2011

Secretary of State Hillary Rodham Clinton is in Geneva this morning meeting with the United Nations Human Rights council to coordinate a new effort to force Libyan strongman Col. Moammar Gadhafi to step down. Clinton said the U.S. would "offer any kind of assistance" the rebels need. The BBC's State Department correspondent Kim Ghattas has been traveling with Clinton and joins us from Geneva.

Comment

The Takeaway

YouTube Video Mocks Gadhafi

Monday, February 28, 2011

Libyan leader Moammar Gadhafi, who appears to be on his way out, is getting his share of satirical punches on the viral video circuit. A video mocking Gadhafi has gone viral, getting over 650,000 hits on YouTube, and has been met with postive reviews from the Arab community, especially in Libya. Here's the twist — the video was made by a Jewish Israeli, Noy Alooshe, a journalist, musician and internet buff.

Comments [1]

The Takeaway

Refugees Flock to Libyan-Tunisian Border

Monday, February 28, 2011

It has been called a modern day exodus: Over 100,000 people have fled Libya so far in the wake of the protests and violent retaliation from Col. Moammar Gadhafi’s regime. The majority of the Libyan population lives in Tripoli, which is in the western part of the country. Tens of thousands have now fled to the country's nearest border, to Tunisia, in just the past few days. How will Tunisia — in upheval itself over recent revolution — deal with the influx?

Comment

It's A Free Country ®

The Mix: This Is What Democracy Looks Like

Friday, February 25, 2011

It's A Free Country's The Mix, where we take some of the notable clips and other voices found on WNYC this week and mix 'em up. Voices are in bold, connections are in italics.

Comment

It's A Free Country ®

Libyan Unrest and Gas Prices Here

Friday, February 25, 2011

[Prices] are not being moved by fundamentals. Supply is ample...What you have instead is a price being driven merely by the amount of money that flows into oil as an asset class, which in fact the oil market, or any commodity market, was never intended to be—an investment, a bet or a wager. In fact, it's become that, so when these geopolitical things happen you have this flood of money into a marketplace that was never designed to accept it, and you have an enormous spike in prices.

Dan Dicker, author of Oil's Endless Bid: Taming the Unreliable Price of Oil to Secure Our Economy, on the Brian Lehrer Show.

Comments [13]

World Weekly with Gideon Rachman

Libya and the potential oil crisis

Friday, February 25, 2011

Comment

The Takeaway

Interview With a Libyan Eyewitness

Friday, February 25, 2011

The rebellion has been hit hard by Gadhafi's forces, who are killing protesters. Although many are too scared to leave their homes, the  pro-Democracy movement continues to take to the streets of cities across Libya. A big protest has been called in the capital, Tripoli. One protester, interviewed here by the BBC, explains what it's like in the streets and why he'll keep fighting against the dictator.

Comment

The Takeaway

Libya: 'Great Turmoil and Conflict' Continues

Friday, February 25, 2011

Protesters have vowed to take to the streets of Tripoli, despite threats of a violent crackdown by pro-government mercenaries. Security forces are reportedly surrounding mosques throughout Tripoli and tanks and checkpoints line the roads. The BBC's Jim Muir is on the Libyan border. He says it's challenging to know exactly what is going on in the capital, but witnesses have told him that there have been gun shots in Tripoli.

Comments [1]

The Leonard Lopate Show

Backstory: Moammar Gadhafi

Thursday, February 24, 2011

Dirk Vandewalle, Associate Professor of Government at Dartmouth University, discusses the 40-year rule of Libya’s Colonel Moammar Gadhafi. Professor Vandewalle’s most recent books are A History of Modern Libya and Libya since 1969: Qadhafi's Revolution Revisited.

Comments [6]

The Takeaway

Libyan Author Hisham Matar Reflects on Uprising

Thursday, February 24, 2011

The uprising to end Col. Moammar Gadhafi's 42-year reign has been a bloody one, with the embattled leader refusing to step down and vowing to arrest or kill the people who continue to stream into the streets to fight for freedom. The uprising may lead the country to a more peaceful and democratic future; however, much is still uncertain, and the violence is nothing new. Libyan author and activist Hisham Matar says he hasn't slept at all since the revolt began. Matar's father was kidnapped in 1990 and is believed to be held in a prison in Libya ever since.

Comment

The Takeaway

Update: Battle for Tripoli

Thursday, February 24, 2011

The New York Times' David Kirkpatrick is on the Libyan border. He reports that Libyans are preparing to fight for Tripoli as areas nearby appear to be in the opposition's control. The question of whether Col. Gadhafi will leave Libya has yet to be answered.

Comment

It's A Free Country ®

What Are the Prospects for Democracy in Libya?

Wednesday, February 23, 2011

WNYC
All the western powers and Clinton and Obama have is, at this point, very weak power of talk, of rhetoric. They will make noises and they will condemn and they will say that's too bad, and they're right, it is terrible and it ought to be stopped. But we live in a world where it's impossible to intervene in the internal affairs, even when a revolution is going on, without inviting the charge of imperialism and colonialism.

Benjamin Barber, political theorist and Distinguished Fellow at the policy center Demos, on the Brian Lehrer Show.

Comments [3]

The Takeaway

What Would Libya Be Like Without Gadhafi?

Wednesday, February 23, 2011

Foreign affairs correspondent for the British Sunday Times, Marie Colvin has interviewed Col. Gadhafi many times. She says his self-indulgent ramblings are nothing new. He's terribly self indulgent, she says, and he kills anyone who speaks out against him. "I think he is feeling trapped, I think he is feeling pressure but he is rutheless. I suspect he still thinks he can survive," she says. Gadhafi has been grooming his sons to take over, but if he goes down, his sons will likely go down as well. Additionally, there isn't much of an opposition movement in Libya, as Col. Gadhafi kills anyone who opposes him.

Comment

The Takeaway

Update From the Libyan Border

Wednesday, February 23, 2011

David Kirkpatrick is near the Libyan border reporting for The New York Times. He says that those coming across the border say that there's fighting in the northwest, and that the situation is violent and dire inside the country. At the same time, he says, Libyans are ready to live in a country free from the dictatorship of Col. Gadhafi.

Comment

The Takeaway

Reports: Foreign Mercenaries Fighting in Libya

Wednesday, February 23, 2011

As opposition forces in Libya gain ground, there are reports that Col. Gadhafi has hired foreign mercenaries to help bolster his fight to stay in power. Mohamed Yehia, online editor for the BBC Arabic service in London explains that although the mercenaries don't get paid very much, it is easier for Gadhafi to hire them than to ask his Libyan's to fire on their own people.

Comment

The Takeaway

Libya: Opposition Forces Fight On

Wednesday, February 23, 2011

"Gadhafi's power seems to be under very serious challenge," says Ian Black, Middle East editor for The Guardian. Opposition forces have taken control of the eastern part of Libya and reports say that they have taken control of a city near Tripoli. The impression is that key leaders have started to abandon Gadhafi, with the interior minister, one of the original comarades of the Libyan revolution, defecting. However, the country is rich and Gadhafi has many resources at his disposal. The fight will likely be a bloody one.

Comment

The Takeaway

Can a No-Fly Zone Stop Gadhafi?

Wednesday, February 23, 2011

After Moammar Gadhafi made a defiant and rambling speech to the people of Libya yesterday, where he refused to step down and swore that he would die a martyr, the international community was left to decide exactly how to respond. German Chancelor Angela Merkel called the speech ‘alarming’ and threatened sanctions on the North African Nation. Meanwhile the head of Libya’s anti-Gadhafi delegation at the UN called on the Security Council to address the violence that he has unleashed on the Libyan people. Some are worried attacks on protesters by the Libyan air force could be next.

Comment

The Brian Lehrer Show

Democracy Prospects in Libya

Wednesday, February 23, 2011

Benjamin Barber, internationally renowned political theorist and Distinguished Fellow at the policy center Demos, and a former member of the Gaddafi International Charity and Development Foundation, discusses his resignation from the Gaddafi International Charity and Development Foundation and his take on the prospects for democracy in Libya.

 Read a Recap and Join the Conversation at It's A Free Country