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Leonard Cohen

Soundcheck

'Hallelujah': The Story Of One Song's Ascent

Wednesday, July 23, 2014

Whether you know the original, or covers by Jeff Buckley, Imogen Heap or Rufus Wainwright, Leonard Cohen song "Hallelujah" has, against all odds, become one of the most widely recorded songs in music history. Music journalist and author Alan Light explains the enduring popularity of the song in his book, The Holy Or The Broken: Leonard Cohen, Jeff Buckley & The Unlikely Ascent Of Hallelujah.

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New Sounds

Unexpected Covers

Saturday, June 21, 2014

For this New Sounds program, hear Antony & the Johnsons cover Bob Dylan, and the Unthanks cover Antony & the Johnsons.  There are other covers of Leonard Cohen songs, along with more Bob more Dylan covers, and the Unthanks take on songs by Robert Wyatt as well.

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New Sounds

Evening Songs

Monday, May 26, 2014

For this New Sounds, we’ll listen to songs with a twilight feel – that is, evening songs.  We’ll hear songs, both old and new - by Henry Purcell along with songs by Leonard Cohen and Nick Drake-  featuring baroque harp, Swedish Nickelharpa, and viola da gamba on a record called “If Grief Could Wait.”  The project is a collaboration between baroque harpist Giovanna Pessi and the Swedish singer Susanna Wallumrød.

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All Ears with Terrance McKnight

Star-Crossed

Saturday, January 18, 2014

Hear what happens when pop and classical flavors collide. Guest host Lauren Rico delves into the musical alter egos of Sting, Michael Bolton, Billy Joel and Renée Fleming, among others.

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Soundcheck

Inside The Chelsea Hotel

Friday, December 13, 2013

Sherill Tippins, author of Inside the Dream Palace: The Life and Times of New York’s Legendary Chelsea Hotel, talks with Soundcheck host John Schaefer about some of the Chelsea 's many stories, and how it was designed from the beginning to foster creativity.

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New Sounds

Unexpected Covers

Thursday, June 06, 2013

For this New Sounds program, hear Antony & the Johnsons cover Bob Dylan, and the Unthanks cover Antony & the Johnsons.  There are other covers of Leonard Cohen songs, along with more Bob more Dylan covers, and the Unthanks take on songs by Robert Wyatt as well.

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New Sounds

Evening Songs

Tuesday, May 14, 2013

For this New Sounds, we’ll listen to songs with a twilight feel – that is, evening songs.  We’ll hear songs, both old and new - by Henry Purcell along with songs by Leonard Cohen and Nick Drake-  featuring baroque harp, Swedish Nickelharpa, and viola da gamba on a record called “If Grief Could Wait.”  The project is a collaboration between baroque harpist Giovanna Pessi and the Swedish singer Susanna Wallumrød.

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Spinning on Air

John Simon, Songwriter, and Producer of Landmark Albums of the '60s

Sunday, April 21, 2013

Back in 1996 David Garland welcomed John Simon to the WNYC Studio to perform and to talk about Simon's music and career. Here are highlights from that session, featuring John Simon's solo renditions of several of his songs, music from some of the albums he produced for Leonard Cohen, Simon & Garfunkel, and The Band, and more.

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Soundcheck

Is There Such A Thing As 'Too Old To Rock?'

Wednesday, January 30, 2013

Billboard editor Joe Levy says that growing old in rock 'n' roll is uncharted territory. Is there such a thing as 'too old to rock'?

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Soundcheck

The Life, Faith, And Words Of Leonard Cohen

Thursday, November 29, 2012

The new biography I'm Your Man chronicles the roles that religion, loneliness and beautiful muses have played in the work of singer-songwriter Leonard Cohen.

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Spinning on Air

Judy Collins Presents Wildflowers

Sunday, October 28, 2012

 

Judy Collins joins David Garland to talk about her landmark album "Wildflowers." In 1967 singer Judy Collins wanted to make an album that would take her and her listeners to new musical territory. Collins' earliest albums (her first was released in 1961) featured traditional American folk songs, but she was starting to sing a more adventurous, eclectic array of material. Her album "Wildflowers" featured music by two remarkable songwriters who hadn't yet had much exposure: Joni Mitchell and Leonard Cohen. And Collins' own remarkable songs were first heard on the album. 
The orchestrations provided by Joshua Rifkin give the album a timeless quality, and even though "Wildflowers" yielded a hit song in "Both Sides Now," the album as a whole is just as daring and romantic as Collins intended it to be. In this show Judy Collins reflects on the experience of making "Wildflowers," and presents some of its exquisite songs.

 

Judy Collins joins David Garland to talk about her landmark album "Wildflowers." In 1967 singer Judy Collins wanted to make an album that would take her and her listeners to new musical territory. "Wildflowers" featured music by two remarkable songwriters who hadn't yet had much exposure: Joni Mitchell and Leonard Cohen, plus Collins' own first remarkable songs. The album is still just as daring and romantic as Collins intended it to be.

 

 

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New Sounds

New Songs Live: Kahane and Pastorini

Sunday, October 14, 2012

From the New Sounds Live concerts at Merkin Hall, hear the second part of a program of new art songs, including works by Ed Pastorini and Gabriel Kahane , two gifted New York singer/pianists with an unusual approach to the song form.

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New Sounds

Unexpected Cover Songs

Friday, February 24, 2012

For this New Sounds program, hear Antony & the Johnsons cover Bob Dylan, and the Unthanks cover Antony & the Johnsons.  There are other covers of Leonard Cohen songs, along with more Bob more Dylan covers, and the Unthanks take on songs by Robert Wyatt as well. 

Comments [6]

New Sounds

Evening Songs

Friday, February 03, 2012

For this New Sounds, we’ll listen to songs with a twilight feel – that is, evening songs.  We’ll hear songs, both old and new - by Henry Purcell along with songs by Leonard Cohen and Nick Drake-  featuring baroque harp, Swedish Nickelharpa, and viola da gamba on a record called “If Grief Could Wait.”  The project is a collaboration between baroque harpist Giovanna Pessi and the Swedish singer Susanna Wallumrød.  

Comments [6]

New Sounds

New Songs Live: Kahane and Pastorini

Thursday, October 06, 2011

From the New Sounds Live concerts at Merkin Hall, hear the second part of a program of new art songs, including works by Ed Pastorini and Gabriel Kahane , two gifted New York singer/pianists with an unusual approach to the song form.

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New Sounds

Piano Plus

Saturday, June 25, 2011

For this New Sounds, listen to a whole bunch of music involving the piano plus electronics, and other things.  Hear music by Marco Benevento, who adds circuit-bending and electronics to his piano works.  Plus, Omar Sosa bridges the gap between Anglo-American folk song and Afro-Cuban rhythms with his ensemble, and Daniel Bernard Roumain adds looping and processed sounds to his Hip-Hop Etudes, and more.

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Studio 360

Renée Fleming Goes Pop

Thursday, June 03, 2010

This weekend, Renée Fleming will release her 29th album. But it isn't a new recording of a Romantic opera or a set of lieder: America's favorite soprano has gone pop.

Dark Hope features eleven covers, including songs by the Arcade Fire and Jefferson Airplane.  And Fleming ...

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WNYC News

F Mo on L Co

Friday, February 20, 2009

Thoughts on the Hardest Working (and most Self-Serious) Septuagenarian in Showbiz

Leonard Cohen at the Beacon Theatre. (Michael Loccisano/Getty Images)

Leonard Cohen at the Beacon Theatre. (Michael Loccisano/Getty Images)

'Dance Me to the End of Love'
Last time Leonard Cohen played in New York, a decade and a half ago, he was 'just a young kid with a dream.' Or so the 75-year-old Canadian singer told a packed house last night at the recently reopened Beacon Theater. In the 15 years he's been gone, Cohen said, he studied religion, sought cheerfulness, and took a lot of Prozac and Tylenol Full Strength. 'I know the hard times are coming,' Cohen told the audience, one of the few times he spoke between songs. 'A lot of people say it's gonna be worse ... than ... the Y2K.'

To watch Bruce Springsteen is to marvel at his physical energy and hope you can move half so good at age 60. To listen to Leonard Cohen is to be in awe of his pipes and hope that at age 75 your voice could have a fraction of his timbre and vitality. His bass still rumbles fierce, the edges are there, and those deep, rich tones seem NOT to have softened and mellowed over time the way people are always describing fine wine and Scotch.

And then there's the songs.

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