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Drink Up! Idaho OKs 'Five Wives' Vodka

Thursday, June 07, 2012

Originally banned because its name and label might offend women and Mormons, the vodka can now be sold there. The state reversed course after a lawsuit was threatened.

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WNYC News

Edwards Not Guilty On One Charge, Mistrial Declared On Other Counts

Thursday, May 31, 2012

Prosecutors must now decide whether to retry Edwards on the other five charges.

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WNYC News

Supreme Court Justice Stephen Breyer Again A Crime Victim

Friday, May 18, 2012

US Supreme Court Justice Stephen Breyer's Washington home was burglarized in early May, just months after he and his wife were robbed while on vacation in the West Indies.

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WNYC News

In Interview, Zimmerman's Lawyer Says Trial Won't Happen In 2012

Friday, April 13, 2012

When he appeared in court on second-degree murder charges in the shooting death of teenager Trayvon Martin, George Zimmerman was accompanied by his new defense attorney, Mark O'Mara. After the hearing, O'Mara told NPR that he doubts the case will go to trial in 2012.

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The Takeaway

Supreme Court Rules Against GPS Tracking

Tuesday, January 24, 2012

On Monday the Supreme Court ruled unanimously that police violated the 4th amendment when they placed a Global Positioning System (GPS) tracking device on a suspect’s car and monitored its movements for 28 days. In his opinion on the case, Justice Anthony Scalia wrote that the use of GPS constituted a "search" and therefore requires a warrant. This ruling may have an impact on other cases where GPS was used, as well as other types of surveillance mechanisms.

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WNYC News

Wednesday's Web 'Blackout' By Wikipedia, Others: Right Way To Protest?

Tuesday, January 17, 2012

Wikipedia has said it will join other websites Wednesday and go black to protest anti-piracy bills being considered by Congress. The backlash against the Stop Online Piracy Act and the Protect Intellectual Property Act has gotten a higher profile.

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WNYC News

Judge Declares Natalee Holloway Legally Dead

Thursday, January 12, 2012

The Alabama teen went missing while on a high school graduation trip in Aruba in 2005. Her body has not been found.

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WNYC News

Judge Robert Carter, An 'Architect Of Desegregation,' Has Died

Wednesday, January 04, 2012

He was a key member of the legal team that convinced the U.S. Supreme Court to outlaw segregated public schools in 1954's landmark Brown v. the Board of Education decision.

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WNYC News

Parts Of South Carolina's New Immigration Law Blocked

Friday, December 23, 2011

A federal judge blocks portions of South Carolina's strict new immigration law intended to stop illegal immigrants. The judge says the state is taking over immigration powers that belong to the federal government.

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WNYC News

Supreme Court Will Hear Arguments On Arizona Immigration Law

Monday, December 12, 2011

The Obama administration has challenged the law, saying it encroaches on the federal government's jurisdiction.

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WNYC News

BP Accuses Halliburton Of Destroying Gulf Spill Evidence

Tuesday, December 06, 2011

Halliburton, meanwhile, denies that allegation and accuses BP of fraud and defamation. The two companies are trading charges and blame for the nation's worst offshore oil spill — the April 2010 disaster in the Gulf of Mexico.

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WNYC News

NBA Anti-Trust Lawsuit Will Take Months To Reach Court

Friday, November 18, 2011

NBA players learn the anti-trust lawsuit they filed against NBA owners won't be heard in federal court in California until next March.

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The Takeaway

Does the Fourth Amendment Protect Against GPS Tracking?

Tuesday, November 08, 2011

The Supreme Court will hear arguments on Tuesday in a case that could have broad implications for how modern surveillance technology is used to track criminals. The question at stake in The United States v. Antoine Jones is whether Fourth Amendment protections from "unreasonable searches and seizures" extends to GPS tracking and where the boundaries between public and private space lies in an era when many people are increasingly trackable through smart phones and other digital devices.

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WNYC News

Amanda Knox Wins Appeal, As Italian Court Overturns Murder Conviction

Monday, October 03, 2011

An Italian panel has granted Amanda Knox's appeal of her murder conviction, for which the American had been serving a 26-year prison sentence. Knox, who came to Perugia, Italy, as an exchange student, had been found guilty in the November 2007 murder of British student Meredith Kercher.

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The Takeaway

Ohio Mom Jailed for Sending Kids to Better District Gets Reduced Convictions

Wednesday, September 28, 2011

Kelley Williams-Bolar, a mother of two girls in Akron, Ohio, served nine days in prison in January. Williams-Bolar was convicted of falsifying documents to allow her daughters to attend school in a better district than the one where they reside. She was working as a teacher's aid before the conviction and was studying to become a teacher, but having two felony charges would likely have kept that from happening — until Ohio Governor John Kasich announced he was going to reduce Williams-Bolar's convictions to misdemeanors.

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The Takeaway

What's Next for Dominique Strauss-Kahn

Tuesday, July 05, 2011

After weeks of fighting accusations of sexual assault against a hotel maid, Dominique Strauss-Kahn, former head of the International Monetary Fund, is facing new allegations. Tristane Banon, a French novelist, is filing a criminal complaint against Strauss-Kahn for attempted rape in 2003. The statute of limitations for rape cases in France is 10 years. Will this case be negatively affected by the outcome of the first case? Or by the media’s attention?

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The Takeaway

Chicago Jury Convicts Blagojevich of Corruption

Tuesday, June 28, 2011

Illinois' embattled ex-Governor Rod Blagojevich was found guilty yesterday on 17 counts of corruption, and could face up to 20 years in prison. Blagojevich was caught on tape trying to extort money in exchange for President Obama's vacated Senate seat in late 2008. Blagojevich had maintained his innocence throughout the trial, and was surprised by the guilty verdict. “I, frankly, am stunned," he told reporters. 

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WNYC News

The Wiretaps That Built The Case Against Galleon's Rajaratnam

Wednesday, May 11, 2011

Financial giant Raj Rajaratnam, a billionaire investor who founded Galleon Group, was found guilty Wednesday in New York in the largest insider trading case ever involving hedge funds. The case against him was made stronger because of wiretapped conversations in which he brazenly swapped inside stock tips.

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The Takeaway

An Accused Terrorist's Near-Total Acquittal Raises Questions

Thursday, November 18, 2010

Yesterday the first Guantánamo detainee to be tried in a federal civilian court was acquitted of all but one of the charges against him. In total Ahmed Khalfan Ghailani faced nearly 300 charges of conspiracy and murder in the 1998 terrorist bombings of the U.S. embassies in Nairobi, Kenya and Dar es Salaam, Tanzania.

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The Takeaway

Fire, Death and Looking for Posthumous Innocence

Thursday, October 14, 2010

Cameron Todd Willingham was executed by the state of Texas in 2004. He was tried, convicted, and executed by lethal injection for setting fire to his home and killing his three young daughters, on December 23, 1991.

But forensic investigators have called the facts of the case into question – most notably whether the fire was arson, or an accident. (Willingham maintained his innocence to the very end, passing up a chance to plead guilty in exchange for a life sentence.)

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