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Leaks

On The Media

Stephen Kim's Leak

Friday, March 20, 2015

Stephen Kim is in prison for speaking about a classified document with a reporter, but according to journalist Peter Maass the government threw the book at the wrong leaker. 

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PRI's The World

Eric Holder will resign, leaving a mixed legacy on national security issues

Thursday, September 25, 2014

When he joined President Obama's cabinet, Attorney General Eric Holder was expected to oversee the shutdown of the US detention facility at Guantanamo Bay, Cuba. That never happened, but Holder succeeded in shifting focus back to civilian courts — but also aggressively onto leakers.

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The Leonard Lopate Show

Glenn Greenwald on Edward Snowden and the 'Inept and Menacing' NSA

Tuesday, May 13, 2014

Journalist Glenn Greenwald on traveling to Hong Kong to meet Edward Snowden, the scope of NSA's data collection, and why the NSA still doesn't know what documents Snowden took. 

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On The Media

The British Government DDOS'd Anonymous, and I Don't Think It's a Big Deal (UPDATED)

Wednesday, February 05, 2014

Update: Journalist Quinn Norton strongly disagreed with me on Twitter, so I asked her to write something about why she disagreed. I have attached her response to the bottom of the article.

One of the favorite tools of the internet hacker/troll collective Anonymous is the denial of service attack, or DDOS. Basically it works by flooding a site with so many queries that it becomes overwhelmed, and the rest of the internet can't access it. I've compared it in the past to the online equivalent of a sit-in - when deployed correctly, it disrupts business but causes no lasting damage.

According to the latest Snowden leaks, British authorities were using the same disruption methods against Anonymous that Anonymous was using against other parts of the internet.

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On The Media

Journey to the Center of the NSA

Friday, December 20, 2013

Last Sunday's 60 Minutes profile of the NSA was almost universally reviled. But 60 Minutes is not the only outlet that has spent time at the agency's headquarters in Maryland. Brooke talks to Daniel Drezner, who wrote about his trip to the NSA's headquarters and the agency's new PR push for Foreign Policy.

Shigeto - Ringleader

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The Takeaway

Greenwald on Snowden Leaks: "Hold Me Accountable"

Tuesday, December 17, 2013

Glenn Greenwald, the journalist who helped Edward Snowden break news of the NSA’s mas surveillance apparatus, has found himself in the middle one of the year’s biggest news stories. In this second half of a two-part interview with The Takeaway, Greenwald shifts his focus from national security issues to the meaning of responsible journalism. “The public will ultimately judge what it is that I do just like anybody else who’s acting in a way that affects public life, and I think that’s how it should be,” he says.

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The Takeaway

Rep. Tom McClintock: "Congress Should Prosecute James Clapper"

Tuesday, December 17, 2013

NSA officials are mulling a possible amnesty for leaker Edward Snowden. In exchange for the safe return of the rest of the documents he took from the NSA, Snowden could come back to the U.S. and avoid prosecution. The White House yesterday said that it opposes amnesty, while officials in the NSA are split. One supporter of an amnesty deal is Congressman Tom McClintock, a Republican representing California's Fourth District, who joins The Takeaway to discuss a possible deal.

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The Takeaway

Ira Flatow on Extreme Weather One Year After Sandy | Britain Seeks to Stop The Publishing of Snowden's Leaks | Young Egyptians Discuss Their Country's Future

Tuesday, October 29, 2013

A Look at The Federal Response to Sandy | In the Face of Disaster, Would You Stay? | Britain Seeks to Prevent The Publishing of Snowden's Leaks | As U.S. Changes Foreign Policy Priorities, Will Egypt be Left Behind? | Young Egyptians Discuss Their Country's Future | Science Friday's Ira Flatow on ...

On The Media

The Manhattan Project

Friday, October 11, 2013

In a world steeped in regular government leaks, there’s a tendency to believe that journalists’ exposure of government secrets is a new phenomenon. We think of the press of the past – during wartime, especially –  as more willing to obey censorship laws to protect government secrets. Bob talks to nuclear historian Alex Wellerstein who says this isn’t so, and he tells us about the leak of one of the government’s most-protected secrets to prove it.

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The Takeaway

Snowden Strikes Again With New Leaks

Friday, September 06, 2013

According to our partner The New York Times, the N.S.A. has bypassed or simply cracked much of the digital encryption used by businesses and regular Americans by building powerful supercomputers to break encryption codes, among other things. Scott Shane, national security correspondent for our partner The New York Times, explains Snowden's latest leak.

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The Takeaway

Senator Angus King Leaning Towards Treason On Snowden

Friday, June 28, 2013

While Edward Snowden waits for his application for asylum in Ecuador to be processed, we bring the story back to American soil. Why was the leak such a big deal, and how can we maintain both security and privacy in its wake? Senator Angus King sits on the Senate Intelligence Committee and joins us to discuss how lawmakers intend to move forward. 

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The Takeaway

U.S. Cracks Down on Leaks With Insider Threat Program

Monday, June 24, 2013

From the Peace Corps to the Social Security administration, the Obama administration wants to stop leaks. According to a Department of Defense Strategy memo obtained by McClatchy reporters, there's a new initiative called the Insider Threat Program. To discuss this we're joined by Kel McClanahan, an attorney specializing in national security law and information law, along with Marisa Taylor, reporter for McClatchy who reported on the Insider Threat Program.

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On The Media

Offshore Leaks

Friday, June 21, 2013

While the US is focusing on leaks by former NSA contractor Edward Snowden, international journalists have been reporting stories from a massive trove of documents called the "Offshore Leaks" that reveals the mysterious world of offshore tax havens. Brooke talks to Gerard Ryle, the Director of the Center for Public Integrity's International Consortium for Investigative Journalism about coordinating the reporting on these leaks around the world.

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The Takeaway

Will Edward Snowden be Allowed to Stay in Hong Kong?

Tuesday, June 18, 2013

Hong Kong could be the center of an international legal battle now that NSA-leaker Edward Snowden has announced his intentions to stay in the city. Though it maintains a judiciary, media, and educational system of it's own, the city is technically part of China, and has an extradition agreement with the U.S. Emily Lau, chairwoman of Hong Kong’s Democratic Party, explains the political pressures Hong Kong's leaders expect to face should the U.S. make a move to extradite him.

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The Takeaway

Daniel Ellsberg Discusses Snowden's N.S.A. Leak

Friday, June 14, 2013

In 1971, Daniel Ellsberg was a military analyst working for the Department of Defense. He leaked what became known as the "The Pentagon Papers," which exposed that the US public had been misled about the war in Vietnam.

Ellsberg explains his support for Edward Snowden, who leaked of the NSA's internet and phone data collection; he also examines the similarities between his own leaking of state secrets over 40 years ago and Snowden's actions this week.

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The Leonard Lopate Show

The Bradley Manning Trial

Thursday, June 13, 2013

Ed Pilkington talks about the court-martial trial of PFC. Bradley Manning, accused of leaking sensitive information to WikiLeaks. Pilkington is chief correspondent on the trial for the Guardian, and one of the few journalists to attend nearly every pre-trial hearing. 

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The Brian Lehrer Show

The DoJ vs. Leakers vs. Reporters

Tuesday, May 21, 2013

Details continue to emerge about how the Justice Department is investigating leakers and the reporters they collaborate with (including a long report in the Washington Post about Fox's James Rosen). Ryan Lizza of The New Yorker discusses the effect on journalists and the balance between revealing sensitive information and preserving freedom of the press.

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On The Media

Conservative Bloggers Vindicated, Advice for Leakers, and More

Friday, May 17, 2013

Some vindication for conservative bloggers in the IRS scandal, advice for sources after the AP call-record seizure, the Bloomberg Terminal scandal, and what the people thought the newspaper industry would look like in the future.

The Takeaway

The US Supreme Court: the Most "Leak-Proof" Building in America

Monday, June 25, 2012

If the White House is hoping to clamp down on leaks, they might want to take a few tips from their colleagues at the Supreme Court. Not only do we have no idea how the court will rule on the Affordable Care Act, we're not even sure when the decision will be released. How do they keep their decisions so secret?

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The Takeaway

Holder Attempts to Plug the Leak

Monday, June 11, 2012

Over the weekend, Attorney General Eric Holder announced two investigations into the leaks: one for the Stuxnet operation in Iran and one for the now well-known drone program. Takeaway Washington correspondent Todd Zwillich discusses how these investigations could play out.

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