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Laws

The New Yorker: Political Scene

Jeffrey Toobin and Ryan Lizza on the end of campaign-finance laws.

Thursday, April 10, 2014

Jeffrey Toobin and Ryan Lizza on the end of campaign-finance laws.

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The Brian Lehrer Show

Against Blasphemy Laws

Thursday, November 21, 2013

Having been their victim, Shemeem Burney Abbas, associate professor of political science and gender studies at the State University of New York at Purchase College, and the author of Pakistan's Blasphemy Laws: From Islamic Empires to the Taliban(University of Texas Press, 2013) argues that blasphemy laws in Pakistan and other Islamic countries are politically motivated, not religious.

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The Brian Lehrer Show

China's New Rule for Mandatory Parent Visits

Wednesday, August 07, 2013

Bonnie Tsui, stories editor for The Atlantic, discusses the new Chinese law requiring adult children to visit their parents. Tsui talks about what this legislation tells us about the needs of a growing elderly population in the U.S., and takes your calls on how you manage a long-distance relationship with your parents.

China has just passed a law requiring adult children to visit their parents. BT talks Cleared No
about what this legislation tells us about

Bonnie Tsui, stories editor for The Atlantic, discusses the new Chinese law requiring adult children to visit their parents. Tsui talks about what this legislation tells us about the needs of a growing elderly population in the US, and takes your calls on how you manage a long-distance relationship with your parents.

 

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The Takeaway

Utter a Curse, Suffer a Fine: Massachusetts Town Outlaws Unsavory Language

Tuesday, June 12, 2012

No littering, no public drunkenness, no disorderly conduct... and no cursing? That could be the case if a new law up for vote in Middleborough, Massachusetts, passes. Middleborough is considering imposing a $20 fine for the use of "unsavory language" in its public spaces.

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WNYC News

Livery Plan, And Billions in Budget Funding, Remain in Limbo

Tuesday, June 05, 2012

WNYC

The city isn’t planning to appeal a temporary injunction against the city's 5 Borough Taxi Plan — even though Mayor Michael Bloomberg called the decision “worrisome.” 

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WNYC News

New Year Ushers in New Laws for NY

Sunday, January 01, 2012

The start of a new year means several new laws go into effect Sunday. Some are expected, such as cap levels for property taxes, but others are quirkier, like one new law dealing with bear gallbladders. Here's a look at some of the new statutes for New York.

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The Takeaway

Is the GOP Trying to Undo Barack Obama?

Wednesday, February 09, 2011

When the Republican majority was elected to the House this past November, members of the GOP started talking about repealing the health care reform legislation that was the signature accomplishment of the previous Congress. That call for repeal seems to have revved up Congressional Republicans so much that they’re now trying to repeal several other laws that the Democratic majority passed last year.

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The Takeaway

Billy The Kid Pardoned 130 Years Later

Thursday, December 30, 2010

As one of his final acts in office, New Mexico Governor Bill Richardson says he will pardon the man known as "Billy the Kid," delivering one of America’s best known criminals the pardon he had anticipated for much of his life. The move comes a mere 130 years after the gunslinger’s death. We speak with author/historian Mark Lee Gardener, and discuss why Richardson might want to make such a public pardon to a historical criminal, and ask why the prospect of a pardon is causing such a stir.

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The Takeaway

Billy the Kid: Pardoned After 130 Years

Thursday, December 30, 2010

As one of his final acts in office, New Mexico Governor Bill Richardson says he will pardon the man known as "Billy the Kid," delivering one of America’s best known criminals the pardon he had anticipated for much of his life. The move comes a mere 130 years after the gunslinger’s death. We speak with author/historian Mark Lee Gardener, and discuss why Richardson might want to make such a public pardon to a historical criminal, and ask why the prospect of a pardon is causing such a stir.

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The Takeaway

New Details Complicate Phoebe Prince Case

Thursday, July 22, 2010

The suicide of 15-year-old Phoebe Prince in January made international headlines and changed the way that Massachusetts schools view and prosecute bullying in schools. What was described by state District Attorney Elizabeth Scheibel, initially, as a “nearly three-month campaign” of “relentless” and “torturous” bullying, may in fact have been a more nuanced and complicated case with an emotionally disturbed teenager at its center. 

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The Takeaway

Paying for Justice? How We Elect Judges

Tuesday, June 09, 2009

The U.S. Supreme Court ruled that judges must recuse themselves from ruling on cases that involve individuals who have spent money to help put the judge on the bench. It sounds like a fairly straightforward ruling. But the decision raises larger questions of just how we elect and appoint judges in this country. For a look at the tricky process of electing judges, The Takeaway talks to Adam Liptak, Supreme Court Correspondent for our partners The New York Times, and to Tom Phillips, a lawyer with Baker Botts in Austin, Texas, who served as the Chief Justice of the Texas Supreme Court from 1988 to 2004.

"Whenever you treat a judge the same way you treat other officials that have a different position in office, you tend to confuse within the public's mind, and perhaps even in the judge's mind, the very different roles that different officers in the government perform."
— Attorney Tom Phillips on reforms in appointing judges

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The Takeaway

Texas case challenges Voting Rights Act in Supreme Court

Wednesday, April 29, 2009

The Supreme Court will hear a challenge today that goes to the heart of the Voting Rights Act. This landmark piece of legislation was enacted in 1965 to prevent racial discrimination at the polls. The section of the law at the center of the case requires some states, primarily those in the South, to get federal approval before they can change any of their voting procedures. The changes that require approval from the Justice Department can be as big as a redistricting plan or as small as moving a polling place to a new location. A Texas community got approval for a move, but still decided to take their case to the Supreme Court.

When the U.S. Supreme Court hears the case today, it will be deciding the fate of a hard-fought piece of civil rights legislation. But now that we have an African American president, some say we no longer need the protections afforded by this act. Is the need to protect minorities at the polls outdated? The Takeaway talks to Ted Shaw. He’s a professor at Columbia University Law School and Of Counsel to the law firm of Fulbright and Jaworksi.

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The Takeaway

Revamping regulations

Thursday, March 26, 2009

Treasury Secretary Tim Geithner is heading to Capitol Hill this morning to outline a sweeping overhaul of federal financial regulations. Early leaks of his testimony say the plan would extend regulation for the first time to all trading in financial derivatives and to companies including large hedge funds and major insurers such as AIG. Joining us this morning to look at whether this will stop the next meltdown and whether lawmakers will pass the new regulation laws, are Dan Gross, senior editor at Newsweek and columnist for Slate and Philip Coggan, capital markets editor at The Economist in London.

"It's like we're always fighting the last regulatory war, trying to stop the last bubble from happening again. And, of course, they always find a way to create something new."
—Dan Gross, senior editor at Newsweek, on economic regulation

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