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Law

On The Media

Patent Holders Strike Again

Monday, February 03, 2014

Last week brought us two patent troll stories.

Do you remember Lycos? It was sort of the proto-Google, and was, for a time in the late 90's, the most visited site on the web. Those days are now long gone, but patents that were once owned by Lycos are now being used to force Google to fork over a hefty chunk  of its revenue.

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Life of the Law

School Discipline

Tuesday, January 28, 2014

Thousands of kids are arrested in school every year. About a third of U.S. schools have a regular police presence on campus; some school districts even have their own police forces. As the number of law enforcement officers on campus has gone up, so,

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On The Media

New Frontiers in Child Porn Law

Friday, January 24, 2014

The Supreme Court is weighing how much defendants convicted of possessing images of child pornography should have to pay in restitution to the victims depicted in those images. The case involves a woman known as “Amy,” whose uncle raped her when she was a young girl and circulated photographs of the abuse online. He eventually went to jail, but those photos became among the most widely viewed child porn in the world. Karen Duffin reports on Amy’s quest for restitution.

 

Middlesex Times

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On The Media

Revenge Porn Pioneer Hunter Moore Indicted

Thursday, January 23, 2014

UPDATE: read indictment below.

Time Magazine is reporting that Hunter Moore has been indicted by a grand jury for conspiracy to “access a protected computer without authorization to obtain information for private financial gain.” There aren't many details available and I haven't seen a copy of the indictment online, but will update the story as that information comes in. In the meantime, I've embedded Bob's interview with Moore from December of 2011 below:

hm

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On The Media

Twitter + Libel = Twibel?

Friday, January 17, 2014

The first Twitter Libel case in the United States went on trial last week. The actress and recording artist Courtney Love is accused of defaming her former lawyer in a 2010 tweet. Bob speaks to Ellyn Angelotti, a lawyer and member of the Poynter Institute's faculty, who says the decision in this case could set a social media precedent for defamation -- and explains how the libel standard for print could apply to an 140-character format.

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Life of the Law

Release Day

Wednesday, January 15, 2014

For eighteen years, California’s three strikes law leveled harsh penalties against repeat felons: anyone with two felony convictions received 25 years to life for committing a third felony. In 2012, Californians voted to change the three strikes law,

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Life of the Law

Dibs!

Tuesday, January 07, 2014

With all the snow in the US, we thought we'd bring back an old episode: Dibs. Sit back, stay warm, and listen to an old episode from Life of the Law. - After a big snowstorm, the streets of many northern cities start to get cluttered with furniture.

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The Brian Lehrer Show

Why Marriage is the Ultimate Battle for Gays

Tuesday, January 07, 2014

Roberta Kaplan, the lawyer who argued Edie Windsor's challenge to the Defense of Marriage Act in front of the Supreme Court, talks about the current gay rights cases making their way through the legal system and why she thinks the next big Supreme Court decisions about same-sex marriage may come from cases in states like Ohio, Virginia and Utah. “Because being gay is about who you love, and being married in our legal system is the representation or manifestation of that, I think that in a lot of ways, marriage is the ultimate battle,” Kaplan said. Hear whether she thinks the Supreme Court will decide soon whether Americans have a Constitutional right to same-sex marriage.

TONIGHT: Roberta Kaplan will be speaking with Edie Windsor and comedian and actress Judy Gold at the 92Y at 8:15 p.m.

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Life of the Law

Best of 2013

Thursday, January 02, 2014

This hour-long special hosted by Al Letson features three of Life of the Law's best stories of 2013. Letson leads listeners through the virtual world of games and the law, into a conflict over social mores and the law,

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The Takeaway

Edie Windsor on Her Love Affair with the Gays

Thursday, December 26, 2013

"I can't walk down the street without people stopping me to say thank you," says the 84-year-old, who shot to stardom this year after winning the Supreme Court Case that made gay marriage legal. "It's thrilling."

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The Takeaway

Same-Sex Marriage in 2013 and Beyond

Thursday, December 26, 2013

The Supreme Court's ruling in U.S. v. Windsor, the case that declared the Defense of Marriage Act unconstitutional, marked just one of the many milestones in LGBT rights this year. Dale Carpenter, author of "Flagrant Conduct: The Story of Lawrence v. Texas - How a Bedroom Arrest Decriminalized Gay Americans" and professor at the University of Minnesota Law School, examines the state of same-sex marriage rights as 2013 draws to a close, and looks ahead at what to expect in 2014.

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Radiolab

John McCluskey’s Brain

Tuesday, December 17, 2013

In our Blame episode, we asked whether the condition of a criminal’s brain should lessen the punishment for his crime. Now there’s a headline-making story about this very question.

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Life of the Law

On Prison and Pregnancy

Tuesday, December 17, 2013

United States incarcerates six times as many women as it did thirty years ago. Many of these women are already mothers, and four percent of incarcerated women enter prison pregnant. What happens to the babies born in the correctional system?

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The Takeaway

How Much Power Should the E.P.A. Have?

Tuesday, December 10, 2013

Today the Supreme Court hears arguments in the case Environmental Protection Agency vs. EME Homer City Generation. At the heart of the case is the question of who has the power to act on issues of controlling environmental hazards. Jeff Holmstead is a former assistant administrator for the E.P.A. who is now an attorney with the firm Bracewell and Giuliani. While the Obama Administration defends the E.P.A.'s right to regulation, Holmstead disagrees. 

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Life of the Law

A Criminal Debt

Tuesday, December 03, 2013

It’s not unusual at all to leave prison anywhere across the country owing fees, fines, or other costs to the local court. The city of Philadelphia alone is trying to collect some $1.5 billion in judicial debt owed back to days of the Nixon Administrati...

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The Takeaway

New Indictments Reopen Old Wounds in Steubenville

Wednesday, November 27, 2013

In August 2012, a 16-year-old girl from a town in West Virginia, just across the Ohio River, accused two sophomore starters on the Steubenville High School football team of rape. A judge declared the two underage boys delinquent of rape, the juvenile guilty charge, last March. The investigation didn't end there. This week, a special grand jury handed down four adult indictments related to the case,  for the school superintendent, a former volunteer assistant football coach and two teachers. Ohio Attorney General Mike DeWine discusses the charges, and examines the fallout in Steubenville, where he announced the indictments earlier this week.

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The Takeaway

Law, Regulation & Medicine: A Tricky Balancing Act

Friday, November 22, 2013

Perhaps no other field represents the tricky balance between public protection and private life than medicine. Questions of when the legislature should intervene to protect the public, and when decisions are best left to the doctor and her patient, have been politically fraught territory for decades. Jessie Hill, a professor of law at Case Western Reserve University, is an expert on the law, regulation, medicine, and the difficult decisions in between.

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The Brian Lehrer Show

Sec. Arne Duncan; “Knockout Games”; Your Medal of Freedom

Thursday, November 21, 2013

Attacks known as “knockout games” are making headlines around the country. Jeffrey Butts of CUNY’s John Jay talks about what’s fueling the violence and the media coverage. Plus: US Education Secretary Arne Duncan on his push to recruit teachers; NJPR’s Matt Katz talks about Gov. Christie on the national stage; a deep dive into blasphemy laws; and who deserves a Medal of Freedom?

The Takeaway

New Program Arms Immigrants Facing Deportation with Legal Aid

Wednesday, November 20, 2013

Immigrants facing detention or deportation have no right to a court-appointed attorney. The New York Immigrant Family Unity Project aims to change that. The Project—the first of its kind in the country—provides indigent immigrants representation in detention and deportation proceedings, regardless of whether they can pay. The Project is the result of a task force of attorneys, activists and experts, chaired by Judge Robert Katzman, chief judge of the U.S. Second Circuit Court of Appeals. 

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Life of the Law

Water Rights

Tuesday, November 19, 2013

When a serious drought hit just months after an Oregon court awarded senior water rights to the Klamath Tribes, the tribe made a ‘call’ for water. The call meant enough water in its rivers and streams to keep the Upper Klamath Lake full,

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