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Law

PRI's The World

The release of 'Popeye,' a trusted assassin for Pablo Escobar, enrages many Colombians

Wednesday, August 27, 2014

Cocaine kingpin Pablo Escobar was killed more than two decades ago, but one of the last surviving members of Escobar’s ultra-violent Medellin cartel just became a free man. The release of John Jairo Velásquez, who left prison on August 19, has sparked controversy in Colombia.

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The Takeaway

'Til Death Do Us Part': Inside South Carolina's Domestic Violence Epidemic

Thursday, August 21, 2014

In South Carolina, one woman dies every 12 days from domestic violence. Yet the problem is a silent epidemic, with more animal shelters than domestic violence centers in the state.

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The Takeaway

New Approach to Domestic Violence Saves Lives

Thursday, August 21, 2014

An integrated team approach—with help from police, hospitals and the courts—has successfully prevented domestic violence homicides in Massachusetts.

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The Takeaway

From Father to Son: Dealing with Police While Black

Wednesday, August 20, 2014

A black father instructs his son on how to best handle police harassment, and recalls the similar conversations he had with his father about 40 years ago.

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The Takeaway

Ferguson: The Hard Realities of Race & Justice

Wednesday, August 20, 2014

A longtime public defender examines how the events in Ferguson have highlighted a racial divide in the way communities see the criminal justice system.

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The Takeaway

White Sheriff Talks Race, Police With His Black Son

Wednesday, August 20, 2014

Deputy Sheriff Kevin Fisher-Paulson is white; his adopted son is black. Here he reflects on conversations about race and police as protests continue in Ferguson.

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On The Media

New Delaware Law Allows Users To Will Their Digital Assets To Their Descendants

Tuesday, August 19, 2014

A new Delaware law allows users to leave their digital assets to their descendants.
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The Takeaway

The Takeaway Weekender: Missouri as a Mirror, Support for Victims, and The Beatles Reimagined

Saturday, August 16, 2014

Welcome to The Takeaway Weekender! 

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PRI's The World

In France, Ferguson protests stir memories of suburban riots

Friday, August 15, 2014

The death of Michael Brown and the protests in Ferguson have provoked lots of conversation about the militarization of the police in the United States. France has its own history of racial tensions and riots, and the week's events have reminded some French people of tenser times.

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The Takeaway

Is Ferguson a Mirror for Modern America?

Friday, August 15, 2014

It's the end of a long week for the people of Ferguson, Missouri, after a week of tear gas, rubber bullets, and protests dominated their streets. While the rest of America looks on, it's hard to ignore the fact that we've been here before.

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The Takeaway

New Peacekeeper Cools Tension in Ferguson

Friday, August 15, 2014

Missouri's governor named Captain Ronald Johnson of the Missouri Highway Patrol as the new leader of security operations in Ferguson. Capt. Johnson spent much of last night with protesters, listening to their stories and marching alongside them through the streets. 

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PRI's The World

More and more migrants are being tried as criminals in American courts

Friday, August 15, 2014

"Operation Streamline" is the federal government's program to fast-track immigration cases. It's certainly made it easier to prosecute migrants — or put them in jail. But critics say everything else about the program seems confused.

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The Takeaway

Justice for Sale

Thursday, August 07, 2014

Judicial elections were once considered simply a formality, but increasingly they are playing a major role in the changing political landscape. Today Tennessee voters will decide whether to keep Chief Justice Gary Wade and Justices Connie Clark and Sharon Lee on the state supreme court. The justices have faced an expensive re-election campaign, with conservative groups spending hundreds of thousands of dollars in an effort to see them replaced.

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The Leonard Lopate Show

Government Surveillance Is Making Journalism Harder

Friday, August 01, 2014

U.S. government surveillance is hampering U.S.-based journalists and lawyers in their work and is having a chilling effect on journalists who cover national security, intelligence, and law enforcement, according to Human Rights Watch and the American Civil Liberties Union. Alex Sinha talks about his report “With ...

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The Takeaway

The Violent Past of the NRA's Top Lawyer

Wednesday, July 30, 2014

"The only thing that stops a bad guy with a gun is a good guy with a gun." That has become something of a motto for the National Rifle Association. But according to a new report by Mother Jones magazine, a bad guy with a gun might be the NRA's top lawyer. 

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Life of the Law

Two Sides of a River

Tuesday, July 22, 2014

Sometimes what’s considered as socially acceptable behavior can also be technically unlawful. Reporter Jason Albert follows one city as it grapples with how to enforce laws in a public park without unnecessarily restricting public use.

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The Takeaway

Court Ruling Shakes Up Fate of Death Penalty

Friday, July 18, 2014

U.S. District Judge Cormac Carney ruled that the death penalty was unconstitutional. Judge Carney argues that the lack of certainty over when, and more importantly if an execution will take place constitutes cruel and unusual punishment.

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The Brian Lehrer Show

Game of Drones

Tuesday, July 15, 2014

More and more people are flying drones in and around New York City. We break down where to buy 'em, how to fly 'em, and when it's legal.

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The Leonard Lopate Show

The Noise from a Secret Navy Program Was So Awful, Whales Beached Themselves

Monday, July 14, 2014

A crusading attorney stumbled one of the Navy's best-kept secrets. His fight to stop it took him all the way to the Supreme Court.

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The Takeaway

Why Environmental Crime Goes Unpunished

Monday, July 14, 2014

A new investigation finds that existing environmental regulations are rarely enforced — and environmental crimes are almost never prosecuted.

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