Streams

 

 

Law

The Takeaway

How the Voting Rights Act Came to Be

Wednesday, February 27, 2013

The Supreme Court is set to decide whether an important part of the Voting Rights Act is still necessary. Judy Richardson and Charles Cobb, both of whom fought for voting rights on the front lines, explain how the act came to be.

Comments [1]

The Brian Lehrer Show

Voting Rights Revisited

Wednesday, February 27, 2013

Linda Greenhouse, former Supreme Court reporter for the New York Times, lecturer at Yale Law School, most recent book is The U.S. Supreme Court: A Very Short Introduction, discusses the stakes of the Voting Rights Act case being argued before the Supreme Court today. 

Comments [5]

Life of the Law

Redesigning Justice

Tuesday, February 26, 2013

Red Hook is an isolated neighborhood of Brooklyn, NY, once known as the “crack capital of America.” In 2000, residents banded together to create a community justice center more responsive to the needs of the neighborhood.

Comment

Life of the Law

Felony Factory

Tuesday, February 12, 2013

You’ve just been arrested, charged with a felony and can’t afford to pay your bail, let alone hire a lawyer. You know you have the right to a trial by jury or judge, but what happens when the legal system is too busy to see you?

Comment

Life of the Law

Block Boss

Tuesday, January 29, 2013

On every city block, there are rules. Some are unspoken, some require friendly reminders, some are enforced by the law. Is it ever OK to break the rules in order to prevent others from breaking the rules themselves?

Comment

The Takeaway

Your Company's Social Media Policy Might Be Illegal

Tuesday, January 22, 2013

Employers have typically tried to restrict what their employees say online about work place issues, especially if their comments are negative. But according to some recent rulings by the National Labor Relations Board, many companies' social media policies are illegal. Steven Greenhouse has been reporting on all of this for our partner, The New York Times.

Comment

Life of the Law

Tough Crowd

Tuesday, January 15, 2013

Is the law ever a laughing matter? We present to you a brief history of attempted comedy in the toughest room in the country—the Supreme Courtroom.

Comment

Soundcheck

The Laws They Are A-Changin': Bob Dylan's Copyright Extension Collection

Tuesday, January 15, 2013

We knew that we had a job for the "Copy Cat" -- our go-to copyright expert Jonathan Reichman -- when we saw the title of Bob Dylan's latest release. The 50th Anniversary Collection: The Copyright Extension Collection, Vol. 1 isn't exactly your every day, run-of-the-mill collector's set

Comment

The Leonard Lopate Show

Tributes: Robert Bork

Wednesday, January 09, 2013

Robert Bork made history back in 1987 when his nomination to the Supreme Court was blocked by Congressional Democrats. As a result, modern boundaries of cultural fights over abortion, civil rights, and other issues were drawn. As solicitor general in the U.S. Justice Department, Bork had been involved in the 1973 "Saturday night massacre" of the Watergate era, carrying out President Richard Nixon's order to fire special prosecutor Archibald Cox. The former federal judge and conservative legal scholar died just recently at the age of 85, and you can hear his 1989 interview with Leonard.

Comments [1]

On The Media

National Security Letters and Gag Orders

Friday, January 04, 2013

The most serious kind of subpoena - called a 'National Security Letter' - used to have a lifetime gag-order automatically attached. That is until Nicholas Merrill appealed his and won the right to talk about it. Despite 50,000 national security letters a year, there are only three organizations that have ever won the right to say they got one. In a segment that originally aired in January of 2011, Nick Merrill tells Bob why he's the exception and the rule.

Comments [1]

The Takeaway

Gun Control Proposals and the Second Amendment

Wednesday, December 19, 2012

Politicians across the political spectrum have proposed new gun control measures since the Newtown shooting, but how would the ideas on the table fit into Supreme Court decisions regarding the Second Amendment? Adam Liptak, Supreme Court reporter for Takeaway partner The New York Times, says, "The main obstacles to the passage of such measures is likely to be politics, not constitutional law."

Comment

The Takeaway

America's Changing Relationship with International Law

Wednesday, December 05, 2012

The vote to ratify the United Nations Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities failed in the Senate yesterday by six votes. In recent years, American lawmakers and judges have become increasingly averse to international law. Gabor Rona, international legal director of Human Rights First, explains America's changing relationship to international law and how international treaties function with — or without — American leadership.

Comments [3]

The Takeaway

Should Treatments Based on Junk Science Be Banned?

Friday, November 30, 2012

If a claim is made based on so-called 'junk science,' can it be the basis for fraud or criminal prosecution, or can such claims be banned in some way by the state as dangerous speech? Erwin Chemerinsky, is a professor and dean at the University of California, Irvine, School of Law.

Comments [2]

The Takeaway

OK to Be Gay? Jewish Conversion Therapy Faces First Legal Battle

Thursday, November 29, 2012

More and more critics are saying that gay “conversion therapy” is not only ineffective, but humiliating and psychologically harmful. What will the courts say?

Comments [6]

The Leonard Lopate Show

Wrongful Conviction

Wednesday, November 28, 2012

Radio producer Helen Borten and Daniel Medwed, law professor at Northeastern University and author of Prosecution Compex: America’s Race to Convict and Its Impact on the Innocent, discuss a wrongful conviction murder case that raises hot-button issues: domestic terrorism, racial prejudice—and the techniques of prosecutors that have led to a shocking number of wrongful convictions. Borten made a documentary on the case, which aired in 2004, and she gives an update on a recent hearing.

Comments [3]

The Takeaway

Cell Phone Data a Legal Gray Area in the Courts

Tuesday, November 27, 2012

What happens when technology moves faster than the laws that govern it? That’s the major question before courts across the country, as cell phones, and the overwhelming amount of data they hold, become evidence. Peter Swire, professor at Ohio State University’s Moritz College of Law who worked on law and privacy issues for Presidents Clinton and Obama, explains how courts should deal with the emails, text messages, and social media accounts found on the cell phones of suspected criminals.

Comments [1]

The Leonard Lopate Show

Law and Politics in China

Wednesday, November 14, 2012

Ira Belkin, Executive Director of the U.S. Asia Law Institute at New York University School of Law and a program officer on law and rights at the Ford Foundation in Beijing, and Jerome Cohen, Professor at NYU Law School and a senior fellow for Asia Studies at the Council on Foreign Relations, discuss whether there is a chasm between law and the rule of law in China and look at the relationship between politics and law in China.

Comments [1]

Life of the Law

Law in Translation

Tuesday, October 16, 2012

Vietnamese fishing communities are still finding themselves grounded by the BP oil spill, one of the largest environmental disasters of the century. These fishermen and women are without adequate interpretation services and legal representation and are...

Comment

The Takeaway

Civil Rights, the Courts, and Public Opinion: The Case of Gay Marriage

Thursday, October 11, 2012

While Supreme Court decisions like Brown v. Board of Education can change the course of American history, they can also engender serious political backlash. Is litigation the best way to secure rights for minority groups?

Comments [3]

The Takeaway

Supreme Court Could Overturn Affirmative Action

Wednesday, October 10, 2012

On June 23, 2003, the Supreme Court upheld the affirmative action policy at the University of Michigan Law School. Today, just nine years after Justice O'Connor issued the Court's decision in Grutter, the Supreme Court will hear Fisher v. University of Texas, Austin, a case that has the potential to overturn affirmative action in higher education.

Comments [16]