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Law

The Brian Lehrer Show

Is a Syria Strike Illegal?

Wednesday, September 04, 2013

Oona A. Hathaway, professor of international law at Yale Law School, discusses a potential strike on Syria in the context of international and domestic law.

Comments [19]

Life of the Law

Judging Steinbeck’s Lennie

Tuesday, September 03, 2013

In 2002, the Supreme Court ruled that it is unconstitutional to execute people with mental disabilities. But the Court left it up to individual states to define mentally disabled. After the Texas legislature failed to agree on a definition,

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The Takeaway

Video Surveillance, Facial Recognition Technology and the Law

Thursday, August 29, 2013

Ohio law enforcement have been using facial recognition technology to match driver’s license photos and surveillance footage for months, without telling the public. Jeffrey Rosen, president of the National Constitution Center and professor at George Washington University Law School, describes the current law on surveillance and facial recognition technology.

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The Takeaway

New Report Shows Ohio Police Secretly Use Facial Recognition Technology

Wednesday, August 28, 2013

The Cincinnati Enquirer has revealed that Ohio’s Bureau of Criminal Investigation has used facial recognition technology to match drivers license photos and surveillance footage for months—without telling the public. Reporter Chrissie Thompson discusses her investigation, and Attorney General Mike DeWine defends the law enforcement's use of this technology.

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The Takeaway

Chelsea Manning & the Transgender Prison Experience

Monday, August 26, 2013

Chelsea Manning, formerly known as Bradley, has been sentenced to 35 years in prison for leaking state secrets. The day after sentencing, Manning came out as transgender. Her gender identity could complicate her stay at the all-male military prison Fort Leavenworth, where she is set to spend the next 35 years. Alisha Williams is Director of Prisoner Justice at the Sylvia Rivera Law Project. She explains the predicament of transgender prisoners.

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The Takeaway

Predicting Crime Through Data

Monday, August 26, 2013

Most of profiling has been based on race, gender and neighborhood. But what if those identifying factors were combined with other information, and maybe bits and pieces collected by the NSA? Jim Adler knows from experience that these questions aren’t just the stuff of science fiction. He recently created a program that makes predictions about criminal behavior based on identity.

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The Takeaway

Reuters: D.E.A. Conceals Evidence in Investigations of Americans

Thursday, August 08, 2013

For 20 years, a division of the D.E.A. has been taking data collected from intelligence intercepts and providing it to authorities to launch criminal investigations into Americans. But when it’s time to exchange evidence at pretrial discovery, the D.E.A. routinely conceals this information. John Shiffman, the Reuters reporter and co-author of this exclusive story, joins us to discuss his findings. Nancy Gertner is a Harvard Law School professor who served as a federal judge from 1994 to 2011, joins us to explain the legal perspective.

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Studio 360

John Steinbeck on Death Row in Texas

Friday, July 26, 2013

In 2002, the Supreme Court ruled in Atkins v. Virginia that it was unconstitutional to execute a criminal who was mentally retarded because it violated the Eighth Amendment’s ban on “excessive” punishment. But it fell to the states to decide what would constitute retardation ...

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Life of the Law

Forensics in Flames

Tuesday, July 23, 2013

Over the past 20 years, there’s been a revolution in the science of arson investigations. Many of the clues that had been used for decades to determine that a fire was not accidental, especially the analysis of burn patterns on walls and floors,

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The Takeaway

NJ Supreme Court: Warrants Required to Collect Cell Phone Data

Monday, July 22, 2013

It's been more than a month since revelations about the NSA's mass surveillance programs surfaced and it seems that states are pushing back. Last week, the New Jersey Supreme Court ruled that regardless of federal policy, state law enforcement officers must get a warrant in order to obtain cell phone tracking information. Peter Verniero, a former New Jersey Attorney General and state Supreme Court Justice, and Susan Freiwald, a University of San Francisco Law Professor, explain.

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The Takeaway

A New Voting Rights Act

Wednesday, July 17, 2013

Today Congress takes its first step toward devising a new coverage formula for the Voting Rights Act, as the Senate Judiciary Committee hears testimony from Civil Rights veteran and Congressman John Lewis and Congressman James Sensenbrenner, among others. Yale Law Professor Heather Gerken, an expert in voting rights and election law, weighs in with her recommendations for a new Voting Rights Act.

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Life of the Law

Redefining Rape

Tuesday, July 09, 2013

Most of us have an idea of what the crime of rape is. But the legal meaning of the word rape varies widely, depending on which state you’re in. And in 25 states, what we may think of as rape...isn’t called that at all.

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Based On What We Know, Is The NSA Verizon Request Legal?

Saturday, June 15, 2013

A secret court has issued a secret opinion that says yes. We asked legal scholars to look at the law and explain whether they think the National Security Agency's data-collection program is supported by the statute.

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The Leonard Lopate Show

Background on Gene Patenting and Today's Supreme Court Decision

Thursday, June 13, 2013

Earlier today, the Supreme Court ruled, in a unanimous decision, that human genes can not be patented. The decision will shaped medical research in the decades to come. To find out more about gene patenting, we've collected our interviews on how it works and why the US Patent Office had already offered tens of thousands patents on genes.

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Life of the Law

New Frontiers of Family Law

Tuesday, June 11, 2013

Diana Adams believes the family law system is at least 20 years behind cultural changes. She helps non-traditional families—such as three people in love—find a simulacrum of the protection offered by legal marriage.

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The Brian Lehrer Show

How Worried Should We Be About the NSA?

Monday, June 10, 2013

Slate senior editor Emily Bazelon thinks we should be very worried about NSA snooping and that's it's gone too far. She lays out her reasons why.

Comments [22]

Witnesses At Whitey Bulger's Trial Won't Be Choirboys

Wednesday, June 05, 2013

"When you want to get the devil, you have to go to hell to get your witnesses," says law professor Michael Cassidy. Among those who will be called to the stand in the infamous Boston gangster's trial will be Stephen "The Rifleman" Flemmi. He's serving a life sentence for 10 murders.

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Life of the Law

An Architect’s Code

Tuesday, May 28, 2013

In its code of ethics, the American Institute of Architects requires members to “uphold human rights.” But what does that mean when it comes to prisons—specificially, those that confine inmates largely to their cells with little to do?

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Life of the Law

A Life on the Bench

Tuesday, May 07, 2013

What does it take to become a judge? No one starts their legal career as a jurist. First they work as a lawyer advocating for one side of a case over another. But transitioning from lawyer to judge means hearing both sides of a case objectively and the...

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The Takeaway

Responses: How do you Define 'Justice' today in America?

Monday, May 06, 2013

Last week, we aired a special episode that examined the concepts of law and justice, from the abstract principles of Plato's Athens to the concrete challenges of achieving justice in multicultural, modern America. We asked you to define what justice means to you and to share your own experiences with the American justice system.

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