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Latin America

PRI's The World

Immigration fuels a hot Asian fusion food scene in Lima

Friday, September 05, 2014

Ever heard of "nikkei" and "chifa" cuisine? Neither had food writer Steve Dolinsky, until he went to Lima, Peru. They're a mashup of Asian and Peruvian tastes, created by immigrants.

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The Takeaway

Examining the Protests In Brazil

Thursday, June 20, 2013

The protests in Brazil that initially began as a response to transportation fare increases have grown into a much larger movement, drawing thousands of Brazilians into the streets. Eliane Cantanhêde, a columnist for the newspaper Folha de São Paulo and TV commentator for Globo News em Pauta, joins us to discuss Brazil's economic disparities and the many ways this protest could play out.

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Annotations: The NEH Preservation Project

Edward Barrett Considers Anti-American Sentiment in Latin America

Wednesday, February 06, 2013

WNYC

The violent anti-American demonstrations occasioned by Vice President Richard M. Nixon's recent trip to Latin America are the subject of this 1958 International Interview with Edward W. Barrett, dean of the Columbia Graduate School of Journalism.

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Soundcheck

Paula Morelenbaum: In Studio

Monday, April 23, 2012

Paula Morelenbaum is one of Brazil’s finest singers, and spent 10 years with the famed Brazilian songwriter Antonio Carlos Jobim’s band. She’ll sing one of Jobim’s hits and the haunting theme from the film "Black Orpheus" when she joins us in the studio. 

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The Brian Lehrer Show

The Real News From the Summit of the Americas

Wednesday, April 18, 2012

Mark Weisbrot, co-director of the Center for Economic and Policy Research and columnist for Brazil's Folha de São Paulo, on what happened at the Summit of the Americas on trade, regional power, and Latin American development. And not on the Secret Service scandal.

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The Brian Lehrer Show

Learn from Latin America

Tuesday, December 13, 2011

Jorge Castañeda, who served as foreign minister of Mexico from 2000 to 2003 and is now professor of politics and Latin American and Caribbean studies at New York University, argues that the U.S. should learn from Latin America and protect its middle class. 

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The Takeaway

President Obama Travels to Latin America

Friday, March 18, 2011

While the world watches the events unfolding in Japan and the Middle East, President Obama heads to Latin America for a five day tour. The president and first lady Michelle Obama begin their first official trip to Brazil tomorrow, a country with a fast-rising GDP rate that some economic experts have taken to calling "The New World Player." The president and first lady will also stop in Chile and El Salvador.

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Albums of the Week

Gabriela Montero's Solatino

Saturday, January 01, 2011

The latest recording by Venezuelan pianist Gabriela Montero features inspired performances of 26 short, luminous works by seven Latin American composers as well as her own unique improvisations. It’s our Album of the Week.

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The Takeaway

Lessons from Latin America: An Education for the EU

Tuesday, December 07, 2010

With the European Union in the midst of a severe debt crisis, foreign ministers of the eurozone are meeting this week to discuss remedies for their financial troubles. Latin America went through a difficult debt crisis of their own back in the 1980s, which is often referred to as the "Lost Decade." What lessons can Europe learn from Latin America to help prevent their own lost decade?

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The Takeaway

Earthquake Preparedness Protects Many in Chile

Monday, March 01, 2010

In Chile, the death toll has risen above 700 victims three days after the 8.8 magnitude earthquake shook the country. This is one of the strongest earthquakes recorded in history, and one of the deadliest earthquakes in Chile since the Valdivia quake of 1960.

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The Takeaway

Latin American Economic Summit in Cuba

Monday, December 14, 2009

The leaders of several Latin American nations converged on Havana for a two day summit of the Bolivian Alliance for the Peoples of America (in Spanish, 'ALBA'). BBC's Cuba correspondent Michael Voss joins us with a report on how this Latin American union is dealing with a global economic crisis.

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The Takeaway

Bolivian president makes a play for international intrigue

Friday, April 24, 2009

International intrigue and Latin America have long been partners in crime. So when Bolivian security forces killed an Irish man, a Romanian, and a Hungarian in a hotel room in Santa Cruz, Bolivia in a half-hour shoot out, it sounded like it was ripped from the pages of a high-flung spy novel. Now, Bolivian President Evo Morales said that this alleged assassination attempt by foreign mercenaries could have been backed by the U.S. Government reports say that the group was linked to rightist opposition groups against Morales’ leftist regime, but they have not released the details of their report to the Irish or Hungarian governments who have been seeking answers.

Naomi Daremblum who teaches about Latin American issues at New York University joins The Takeaway to talk about the alleged assassination attempt on President Morales.

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The Takeaway

Critics wary as President Obama reaches out to Venezuela's Hugo Chavez

Wednesday, April 22, 2009

President Obama is signaling a new era of diplomacy with two Latin American nations long considered troublesome for American interests, namely Venezuela and Cuba. President Obama has called for open dialogue with Cuba and has said that "The policy that we've had in place for 50 years hasn't worked the way we want it to. The Cuban people are not free." Then Mr. Obama engaged with Mr. Chavez in a seemingly friendly way, despite criticizing Chavez's policies and anti-U.S. rhetoric. While some critics have accused Mr. Obama of coddling Venezuela, he dismissed such accusations.

But what are the pros and cons of engagement with these two countries, which were the focus of a very different kind of diplomacy under President Bush? To help answer these questions, we turn to former Ambassador Otto Reich, who was the U.S. Ambassador to Venezuela for President Reagan and a former senior Special Envoy and diplomat under Reagan and both G.W. and G.H.W. Bush administrations.

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The Takeaway

President Obama in Mexico

Friday, April 17, 2009

President Obama landed in Mexico City yesterday, pledging his support to help President Calderon and the Mexican government in its fight against the drug cartels that have ravaged the country. The outburst of crime, turf wars and shootouts killed over 6,000 people last year. Though drug violence tops the agenda, Presidents Obama and Calderon will also discuss energy, the economy and immigration. Later today President Obama will continue the conversation when he heads to Trinidad and Tobago for the Summit of the Americas. For a look at how President Obama’s visit to our northern neighbor is defining U.S. foreign policy we are joined by Andres Martinez. He is the Director of the Bernard L. Schwartz Fellows Program for the New America Foundation.

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The Takeaway

President Obama travels to Mexico City

Thursday, April 16, 2009

President Obama touches down in Mexico City this afternoon for talks with his Mexican counterpart Felipe Calderon. This is his first trip to Latin America since being inaugurated. Details of the trip are sketchy due to security concerns, but Obama is sure to address ongoing violence stemming from Mexico’s war against drug cartels. The Takeaway talks to Ioan Grillo Mexico Correspondent for Time Magazine.
"The whole nature of this type of conflict is being called here 'Calderon's Iraq.' And that's what it is in some ways: A conflict that is very hard to win, it's very hard to declare terms of victory and it's very hard to get out of."
—Time Magazine's Ioan Grillo on the ongoing conflict in Mexico

For more, here is the AP's report on the visit:

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The Takeaway

Ambassadors of Freedom: Do Cuban-Americans want the job?

Wednesday, April 15, 2009

President Barack Obama has made clear that he views Cuban Americans as “Ambassadors of Democracy” who can bring a message to Cuba when they visit their families there. But what do Cuban-Americans think? Are they excited at this new patriotic title bestowed on them? Or glad to be able to trace their roots back to the island nation? Are they unwilling to return to Cuba while the Castros are still in power? Or are they just happy to have another beach to visit? This morning we are listening to the response from younger Cuban-Americans who were born here in the U.S. and never personally knew life under Castro or in Cuba. The Takeaway talks to Danny Mendoza, a filmmaker and student at New York University’s Tisch School of the Arts.

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The Takeaway

El Salvador heads to the polls

Monday, March 16, 2009

Large numbers of El Salvadorans voted yesterday in a tense election that could put a leftist in the presidency for the first time in this nation's history. The election is seen as so crucial that thousands of Salvadorans reportedly returned from the United States to vote in their home country. Sara Llana, Latin American Bureau Chief for the Christian Science Monitor, joins The Takeaway for the latest.

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The Takeaway

It's a shake up in Castro's Cuba, hold the rum

Tuesday, March 03, 2009

Cuban President Raul Castro replaced eight cabinet ministers yesterday in a shake-up that ousted politicians linked to Fidel Castro. This move could signal a new era for Cuba. To talk about Cuba's future we are joined by James Painter, Latin American analyst for our partners, the BBC.

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The Takeaway

What President-elect Barack Obama needs to know about Latin America

Thursday, December 11, 2008

"The reason for the terrible image is one single word: Iraq."
— Jorge Castañeda on the U.S.'s image in Latin America

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