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Langston Hughes

Spinning on Air

Poetry & Jazz

Sunday, April 13, 2014

There was a particular renaissance back in the 1950s and '60s, bringing together poetry and jazz. Some of those vintage experiments surely laid the groundwork for the poetry slams and rap of today. David Garland presents some classic poetry and jazz recordings, including the voices of Jack Kerouac and Langston Hughes, along with music by Charles Mingus, Al Cohn and Zoot Sims, Allyn Ferguson, and others.

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WQXR Features

I, Too, Sing America: Music in the Life of Langston Hughes

Sunday, February 17, 2013

Tonight at 9 pm, join WQXR host Terrance McKnight for a one-hour radio special that shines a light on Langston Hughes's lesser-known musical compositions.

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Specials

I, Too, Sing America: Music in the Life of Langston Hughes

Sunday, February 17, 2013

 Langston Hughes, an enduring icon of the Harlem Renaissance, is best-known for his written work, which wedded his fierce dedication to social justice with his belief in the transformative power of the word. But he was a music lover, too, and some of the works he was most proud of were collaborations with composers and musicians. 

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Specials

WNYC Black History Month 2013

Tuesday, February 05, 2013

WNYC celebrates Black History month with programming throughout the month of February. This year we have two programs that mark the 150th anniversary of the Emancipation Proclamation from a live series taking place in WNYC’s Jerome L. Greene Performance Space.

Co-moderated by award-winning writer Carl Hancock Rux and Robin Morris, From Emancipation to the Great Migration takes a look at the historic proclamation within the turbulent contexts of the Civil War, Reconstruction, the Jim Crow Era and the Great Migration.  The State of the Black Economy takes a deep dive into the history of generational poverty and wealth and the current state of the economy for African Americans. Joined by Dr. Cornel West, and CNN financial contributor Ryan Mack, award winning author and radio host, Farai Chideya leads the conversation.  And WQXR’s Terrance McKnight hosts I, Too, Sing America: Music in the Life of Langston Hughes. As he did with his poetry, Langston Hughes used music to denounce war, combat segregation and restore human dignity in the face of Jim Crow.

The New York Public Radio Archives has pulled together some of the department's leading preservation work concerning African-American history.  Listen to previously unreleased interviews with Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. and a rare 1965 interview with Malcolm X, plus much more. Explore the Archives here.

See more Black History programming here

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The Takeaway

Celebrating Langston Hughes and a Personal Connection

Wednesday, February 01, 2012

Wednesday is the 110th birthday of Harlem Renaissance author and social activist Langston Hughes. Celebrated around the world for his emotionally charged yet economic use of language, one of the lesser-known aspects of Hughes' legacy is that of lyricist. In a collaboration with the African-American classical composer William Grant Still - and grandfather of The Takeaway's own Celeste Headlee - Hughes created an opera based on the life of Haitian revolution leader Jean-Jacques Dessalines titled "Troubled Island."

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