Streams

Kelly

The Truth

It's Going to Change Your Life

Wednesday, February 20, 2013

Karen Miller is getting promoted... and it's her worst nightmare. Performed by Kelly Buttermore, Amy Warren, Melanie Hoopes, Louis Kornfeld, Ed Herbstman, and Christian Plauck as "The Grill." Directed & produced by Jonathan Mitchell.

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The Truth

False Ending

Wednesday, January 23, 2013

Recorded live at NYC PodFest on January 13, 2013. Performed by Ed Herbstman, Louis Kornfeld, Chet Siegel, Christian Paluck, Kerry Kastin, Kelly Buttermore, Matt Weir, and Sebastian Conelli. Produced by Jonathan Mitchell.

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Slate Culture Gabfest

The Culture Gabfest: Tasty Medieval Cockentrice Edition

Tuesday, August 21, 2012

Slate critics Stephen Metcalf, Julia Turner and Dana Stevens discuss the re-release of Singin' in the Rain and its place in film history, Time Machine Chefs and food-centric reality TV, and the debate over whether critics should be more critical.

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Transportation Nation

NY MTA Losing $100 Million Annually To Fare Evasion

Monday, June 25, 2012

NY MTA chairman Joe Lhota, at Monday's committee meetings  (photo by Kate Hinds)

Fare evasion costs New York City $100 million a year. And it's worse on buses than subways.

Putting an exact number on the city's problem is difficult, officials said at Monday's New York Metropolitan Transportation Authority committee meeting. Thomas Prendergast, the president of New York City Transit, said "I believe the number is between $50 and $75 million (annually)."

But later that morning, an MTA official said internal estimates put that number closer to $100 million a year -- with fare evasion on buses alone accounting for over $50 million a year.

MTA head Joe Lhota said he met last month with NYPD commissioner Ray Kelly. The result: police are stepping up enforcement and spot checks on buses -- and the effort involves both uniform and undercover officers.

"This new effort has just started," said Lhota, "and I think we'll see the fruit of this relatively soon."

So far this year (as of 6/24), police have made 1,228 "theft of service" arrests on city buses. That's up 72% compared to the same period last year.

Thomas Prendergast said he found some of the fare evasion numbers surprising. "We have the higher end of the rates in Staten Island," he said, "where there's a lot of school service and a lot of the fare evasion may be students."

So far this year there have been 60 arrests for fare evasion in that borough.

Prendergast said he wanted to produce a thorough report on the problem, "rather than just making anecdotal comments."

One board member asked Prendergast why fare evasion occurs more often on buses. "At the front end of my career," said Prendergast, "I drove a bus for 30 days and qualified as a bus operator in Chicago. And let me tell you, it's one of the most difficult jobs."

He then painted a stark picture of a situation drivers could find themselves in. "If you want to work midnight to eight, by yourself on a bus, and challenge somebody for a fare -- we require people to challenge once for a fare -- versus sitting in a booth and calling someone if someone doesn't pay a fare -- it's a very, very complicated issue."

And not a financially insignificant one. "Every dollar we can save from fare evasion is a dollar we can spend for other things," he said.

To give that $100 million figure some context: in 2010, the MTA cut 38 bus lines -- and reduced service on 76 more -- to save $93 million a year.

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Transportation Nation

Ray Kelly: We Investigate Accidents In Case of Serious Injury or Death

Tuesday, June 12, 2012

NYPD commissioner Ray Kelly (photo by Timothy A. Clary/AFP/Getty Images)

Police commissioner Ray Kelly Tuesday affirmed the NYPD's policy about how -- and under what circumstances -- the police department bike and pedestrian crashes.  Transportation Nation first reported  on this back in April.

Kelly was at One Police Plaza Tuesday for the department's annual Medal Day ceremony. In the Q&A afterwards, he was asked by a reporter about this issue. The question came a day after a lawsuit was filed accusing the department of failing to thoroughly investigate when pedestrians and cyclists are struck by cars.

You can read the exchange, or listen to the audio below.

Q: Do you want to respond to transportation advocates who are questioning whether the department investigates deaths (and) injuries of bicyclists who are not likely to die?

Kelly: What is the question? I'm not..what is the question? 

Q:  The transportation advocates are saying the department doesn't investigate deaths...(Kelly: deaths?) involving bicyclists unless the bicyclists are likely to die. Is that something that you -

Kelly: We have a policy for accidents. We don’t have a different policy for bike accidents or accidents involving bicycles. We have -- if people are seriously injured, our accident investigation squad does an investigation.

Q: So they would investigate all accidents involving bicyclists?

Kelly:  Involving serious injury or death.

Q: Serious injury or death?

Kelly: Yes.

 

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