Streams

 

Katrina

New Jersey News

Were Katrina's Lessons a Blessing or a Curse?

Monday, December 09, 2013

WHYY

What did we learn from Katrina and did it end up delaying stopping fraud and waste ... or delaying crucial Sandy aid?

Comment

The Leonard Lopate Show

Education in New Orleans

Wednesday, March 13, 2013

Sarah Carr paints vivid and sobering portrait of education in 21st-century America. In Hope Against Hope, she talk about three individuals involved with the New Orleans education system: a 14-year-old student displaced from her school by Hurricane Katrina; a Harvard grad hoping to bring change; and a veteran educator who becomes principal of one of the first public high schools to reopen after Katrina.

Comment

WNYC News

Unlike Previous Disasters, Few Tax Breaks After Sandy

Monday, March 04, 2013

It’s tax season and many residents of New York and New Jersey lost homes, property and paperwork, making this season particularly difficult, but after Sandy, residents aren’t getting the kind of tax breaks that victims of previous national disasters have received.

Bloomberg to Offer Own Sandy Buy-Out Plan, with a Twist

Comment

WNYC News

Calls for Better Evacuation Plans for the Infirm

Friday, February 22, 2013

As state panels prepare final recommendations for improving disaster preparedness, advocates and experts point to a series of failures in evacuating and housing some of society’s most vulnerable citizens.

Comments [1]

Life of the Law

Law in Translation

Tuesday, October 16, 2012

Vietnamese fishing communities are still finding themselves grounded by the BP oil spill, one of the largest environmental disasters of the century. These fishermen and women are without adequate interpretation services and legal representation and are...

Comment

The Takeaway

Seven Years Later, Danziger Bridge Shooters Sentenced

Thursday, April 05, 2012

On the fall of 2005, New Orleans was in the grip of one of the worst natural and social disasters in American history: Hurricane Katrina. And six days after Katrina hit, it became clear the disaster went beyond rising water, poorly constructed levees, and questionable relief efforts. Laura Maggi of the Times Picayune joins us from New Orleans to tell us about the sentencing and aftermath of the Danziger Bridge case.

Comment

Slate Culture Gabfest

Slate: The Culture Gabfest, Money In The Envelope Edition

Tuesday, March 27, 2012

In this week's Gabfest, our critics revisit AMC’s much-acclaimed drama series Mad Men, now entering its fifth season. Next, they are joined by Nathaniel Rich to discuss his New York Times Magazine article on the atrophied recovery of New Orleans’ 9th

Comment

The Takeaway

Ghost of Katrina Haunts Mississippi Delta

Thursday, May 12, 2011

The Mississippi flooding heading south into the Delta, the 200 mile stretch of land between Memphis, Tennessee, and Vicksburg, Mississippi. Along the way, river residents are watching the waters and the levees carefully, scared that they won't hold. In Vicksburg, the flood is supposed to crest just under the historic record high — and the Army Corps of Engineers says it is monitoring the situation. But even further south, in New Orleans, it is not just the vision of the Mississippi — but the memory of Hurricane Katrina that haunts residents.

Comment

The Brian Lehrer Show

FEMA Five Years After Katrina

Friday, August 27, 2010

Ed O'Keefe, Federal Eye blogger with The Washington Post, discusses the state of FEMA in the post-Katrina era, and why Michael "Brownie" Brown thinks he was the fall guy.

Comments [1]

The Takeaway

Top of the Hour: Katrina Five Years Later; Morning Headlines

Friday, August 27, 2010

Five years later, as we remember the days running up to Hurricane Katrina, the remaining troubles of the disaster are far from gone. That, and this morning's top headlines.

Comment

The Takeaway

A 'Requiem for Katrina' with Terence Blanchard

Thursday, August 26, 2010

It's been five years since Hurricane Katrina hit the Gulf coast, ripping the footing out from under the residents of New Orleans. Many of those residents were musicians, who not only had to rebuild their homes but find their creative spirit after the devastation of the storm. Terence Blanchard, Grammy-winning jazz musician, says he's learned how to set his ego aside when composing music in the aftermath of the hurricane. 

Comment

The Takeaway

6 Indicted in New Orleans Danziger Bridge Shooting

Wednesday, July 14, 2010

Six current and former New Orleans Police Department officers were indicted yesterday in connection with the Danziger Bridge shooting five years ago, amidst the aftermath of Hurricane Katrina. The indictment charges that NOPD officers shot at unarmed civilians as they crossed the bridge on September 4, 2005, leaving four people wounded and two dead: 17-year-old James Brissette and Ronald Madison, a 40-year-old mentally disabled man who was shot in the back and, allegedly, kicked and stomped while dying, laid out on the ground.

Comments [1]

The Takeaway

The Fallout Over the Hurricane Katrina Ruling

Friday, November 20, 2009

On Wednesday, a federal judge in New Orleans awarded approximately $750,000 to three plaintiffs who sued the Army Corps of Engineers for damages they suffered as a result of Hurricane Katrina. The ruling addresses only flooding that occurred as a result of poor maintenance of a shipping channel called the Mississippi River Gulf Outlet. And while $750,000 doesn’t sound like much money in the context of Hurricane Katrina, the legal consequences of this decision could be enormous: It paves the way for many thousands of residents to sue the government over Katrina, a move that may cost the U.S. government billions. We hear from Joseph Bruno, whose firm is also heading a series of suits involving many thousands of plaintiffs suing over levee breaches and insurance payments in the wake of Katrina. We also talk to Ann Parfaite, a resident of the lower 9th Ward, who lost her house in the hurricane, and is one of thousands of plaintiffs who’ve signed up with Mr. Bruno.

Comment

The Takeaway

From High Waters to High Cuisine: The Resurgence of New Orleans Restaurants

Wednesday, September 02, 2009

When Hurricane Katrina roared through Lousiana, the flood waters rose in New Orleans, costing lives and livelihoods. Lost in the devastation were some of the city's biggest tourist attractions and beloved restaurants. Four years after Katrina, we check in with a few of the city's institutions: famed fried chicken purveyor Willie Mae's Scotch House and classic New Orleans restaurant Commander's Palace. Both were closed for months after the hurricane, but with hard work and perseverance their doors have re-opened. We talk to Kerry Seaton, granddaughter of Willie Mae, who now runs the Scotch House, and Tory McPhail, the chef at Commander's Palace, about their experiences in rebuilding. We also have Tom Fitzmorris, a lifelong New Orleans resident and food critic who has made a new hobby of counting the restaurants in the Crescent City.

The resurrection of Willie Mae's Scotch House was a work of love for those involved and it was captured in a documentary produced by the Southern Foodways Alliance called Above the Line: Saving Willie Mae's Scotch House. Watch it below:

Saving Willie Mae's Scotch House from Joe York on Vimeo.

Comments [4]

The Takeaway

In Big Easy, Health Care Still a Challenge

Tuesday, September 01, 2009

When Hurricane Katrina hit, the damage to New Orleans devastated the city's health care system. Four years after the floods, one of the city's biggest hospitals is still closed. As the Crescent City continues to rebuild, residents are relying heavily on local community clinics. We talk to Karen DeSalvo, vice dean of Community Affairs and Health Policy at the Tulane School of Medicine; and Patricia Berryhill, clinical director of the Lower Ninth Ward Health Clinic.

"25 organizations have opened clinics across the city that are very innovative ... They're taking care of 160,000 low-income people in a very new neighborhood-based way. ... One thing that’s got to be remembered epidemiologically is that a lot of these citizens of New Orleans had only access to emergency room care before the storm."” — Karen DeSalvo, vice dean of Community Affairs and Health Policy at the Tulane School of Medicine

Comment

The Takeaway

Wendell Pierce: Rebuilding New Orleans

Monday, August 31, 2009

Actor and New Orleans native Wendell Pierce is probably best known for his role as the cigar-smoking, hard-drinking detective William "Bunk" Moreland on HBO's critically acclaimed drama "The Wire." Since the end of that series, though, Pierce has been keeping busy: in between stage performances in New York City and his work on "Treme," a new HBO drama by David Simon, Pierce has been building affordable, eco-friendly, sustainable homes for a New Orleans neighborhood whose residents were displaced by Hurricane Katrina.

Comment

The Takeaway

New To New Orleans: The Saints Who Came Marching In

Wednesday, July 01, 2009

A new report by the U.S. Census Bureau says that the population of New Orleans grew faster than any other city in America. Who is behind the Big Easy's growth spurt? The Takeaway talks with Jaime Peters and Marcie Dickson. They both moved to New Orleans within the past year and they'll tell us why. We’re also joined by Lolis Eric Elie, a reporter for the New Orleans Times Picayune.

"The people who come here are very excited about being here. And that's not necessarily the case with folks who move just for some job. When people come and are committed to a place or feel there's a sense of mission, they're more apt to be engaged civically."
— Lolis Eric Elie on people moving into New Orleans

Comment

The Takeaway

A Boom in The Big Easy

Wednesday, July 01, 2009

According to a new census report, New Orleans is the fastest growing city in the country. Last year its population grew 8.2 percent faster than any other city. And while the population has not yet reached the levels it was before Hurricane Katrina hit, the city is well on its way. Joining us to talk about life in the Big Easy are Allison Plyer, the co-director of the Greater New Orleans Community Data Center, and Shantrelle Lewis, the director of the McKenna Museum of African American Art and a longtime New Orleans resident.

For a closer look at the people behind the numbers, check out New To New Orleans: The Saints Who Came Marching In.

Click through for transcript

Comment

The Takeaway

A Katrina lawsuit gets underway

Monday, April 20, 2009

Today in New Orleans a trial gets underway that could ultimately determine what kind of damages thousands of victims of Hurricane Katrina can demand from the government. Five residents and one business are suing the Army Corps of Engineers because, they say, the Corps did not properly maintain a shipping channel and that act intensified the storm surge, causing the devastation of neighborhoods including St. Bernard Parish and the Lower Ninth Ward. Saiward Pharr is a radio host in Baton Rouge, Louisiana and is reporting on the case. She'll join The Takeaway with a preview.

Comment

On Being

David Hilfiker — Seeing Poverty After Katrina [remix]

Thursday, August 24, 2006

Hurricane Katrina brought urban poverty in America into all of our living rooms. In this program, David Hilfiker tells the story of how poverty and racial isolation came to be in cities across America. He lives creatively and realistically with questions

Comment