Streams

 

Justice System

The Brian Lehrer Show

School Discipline and Crime

Monday, June 03, 2013

Judith Kaye, former chief judge of the State of New York, discusses the findings of the blue-ribbon task force on education and justice in New York City's public schools.

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The Takeaway

Indian Women Face Corruption Before Justice

Thursday, January 24, 2013

The trial of the 23-year-old woman who was fatally gang raped in India last month is set to begin today. Though her case has been brought to a speedy trial, the process is atypical of the Indian justice system which is plagued  by corrupt law enforcement and an under-equipped judicial system. Arvind Verma is a professor of criminal justice at Indiana University and an expert on the Indian police.

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The Leonard Lopate Show

Wrongful Conviction

Wednesday, November 28, 2012

Radio producer Helen Borten and Daniel Medwed, law professor at Northeastern University and author of Prosecution Compex: America’s Race to Convict and Its Impact on the Innocent, discuss a wrongful conviction murder case that raises hot-button issues: domestic terrorism, racial prejudice—and the techniques of prosecutors that have led to a shocking number of wrongful convictions. Borten made a documentary on the case, which aired in 2004, and she gives an update on a recent hearing.

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The Leonard Lopate Show

Digging Deep

Wednesday, November 28, 2012

Gerard Lordahl, the greening director of GrowNYC, offers tips on how to deal with indoor plants and how to help your garden recover from Sandy and survive the winter. New York Times food writers Julia Moskin and Kim Severson discuss their 12-month-long head-to-head kitchen duel. We’ll look at a wrongful conviction case—and the effort to overturn it. Plus, physicist Sean Carroll discusses the search for the Higgs boson.

The Leonard Lopate Show

Errol Morris on A Wilderness of Error

Wednesday, September 05, 2012

Errol Morris has been investigating one of the most notorious and mysterious murder cases of the 20th century, the case of Jeffrey MacDonald, a Green Beret doctor. He was accused and convicted of murdering his pregnant wife and young daughters in Fort Bragg, North Carolina, in 1970. Morris’s new book A Wilderness of Error: The Trials of Jeffrey MacDonald shows us that almost everything we have been told about the case is deeply unreliable. It’s a careful, thorough investigation that looks at the myth surrounding these murders, and is a meditation on truth and justice.

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The Takeaway

Glenn Greenwald on America's Two-Tiered Justice System

Thursday, July 05, 2012

High-profile cases, where the punishment doesn't seem to fit the crime, are part of what Glenn Greenwald calls America's two-tiered justice system. That's the focus of his book, now out in paperback, "With Liberty and Justice for Some." 

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The Takeaway

Juvenile Justice Through the Lens of Photographer Richard Ross

Tuesday, April 17, 2012

It's hard to imagine life inside an 8x10 concrete cell, but for thousands of American minors, that's reality. They spend night after night locked inside a juvenile detention center. Photographer Richard Ross tries to bring that world to the mainstream public in a new series called "Juvenile-in-Justice." Ross has spent the last five years documenting 350 facilities in over 30 states. What's it like to be locked up in a juvenile detention center? Through stories and photographs, Richard Ross gives us a glimpse.

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The Leonard Lopate Show

Glenn Greenwald on Our Justice System

Monday, December 26, 2011

Glenn Greenwald argues that, over the past four decades, the principle of equality before the law has been replaced with a two-tiered system of justice—the country's political and financial class is virtually immune from prosecution, while the politically powerless are imprisoned with greater ease and in greater numbers than in any other country in the world. With Liberty and Justice for Some reveals the mechanisms that have come to shield the elite from accountability. He shows how the media, both political parties, and the courts have abetted a process that has produced torture, war crimes, domestic spying, and financial fraud.

Comments [4]

The Leonard Lopate Show

The Epidemiology of Mass Incarceration

Monday, December 05, 2011

Public health scholar and Soros Justice Fellow Ernest Drucker argues that imprisonment has become an epidemic in this country, a destabilizing force that undermines families and communities, damaging the very social structures that prevent crime. Drucker spent 20 years treating drug addiction and another 20 studying AIDS in some of the poorest neighborhoods of the South Bronx and the world, and he uses the public health and epidemiological concepts in his book A Plague of Prisons: The Epidemiology of Mass Incarceration in America.

Comments [17]

The Leonard Lopate Show

Custodial Coaching

Friday, November 25, 2011

Prison and criminal justice consultant and coach Wendy Feldman talks about working with people to prepare for incarceration, serve their sentences and re-enter society. She tells of her own experience serving time in a federal prison camp and halfway house, and how it shaped her belief that prison should be a transformational experience. Her program, Custodial Coaching, collaborates with Las Encinas Hospital, The Ranch, Elements Treatment Centers, Promises and others.

Comments [1]

The Leonard Lopate Show

Glenn Greenwald on Our Justice System

Monday, November 07, 2011

Glenn Greenwald argues that, over the past four decades, the principle of equality before the law has been replaced with a two-tiered system of justice—the country's political and financial class is virtually immune from prosecution, while the politically powerless are imprisoned with greater ease and in greater numbers than in any other country in the world. With Liberty and Justice for Some reveals the mechanisms that have come to shield the elite from accountability. He shows how the media, both political parties, and the courts have abetted a process that has produced torture, war crimes, domestic spying, and financial fraud.

Comments [15]

The Leonard Lopate Show

Paradise Lost

Friday, October 07, 2011

Critically acclaimed HBO documentary filmmaker Joe Berlinger discusses the “Paradise Lost” series, directed with Bruce Sinofsky. The latest of which, “Paradise Lost 3: Purgatory,” will be show on HBO in January 2012. The series follows three teenagers arrested in 1993 and wrongfully convicted of murdering three eight-year-old boys, and “Paradise Lost 3” concludes with the release of Jason Baldwin, Damien Echols and Jessie Misskelley, the West Memphis 3, after serving 18 years in prison for a crime they didn’t commit.

Comments [15]

The Leonard Lopate Show

Incarcervention

Wednesday, September 28, 2011

Prison and criminal justice consultant and coach Wendy Feldman talks about working with people to prepare for incarceration, serve their sentences and re-enter society. She tells of her own experience serving time in a federal prison camp and halfway house, and how it shaped her belief that prison should be a transformational experience. Her program, Custodial Coaching, collaborates with Las Encinas Hospital, The Ranch, Elements Treatment Centers, Promises and others.

Comments [10]

The Takeaway

Ohio Mom Jailed for Sending Kids to Better District Gets Reduced Convictions

Wednesday, September 28, 2011

Kelley Williams-Bolar, a mother of two girls in Akron, Ohio, served nine days in prison in January. Williams-Bolar was convicted of falsifying documents to allow her daughters to attend school in a better district than the one where they reside. She was working as a teacher's aid before the conviction and was studying to become a teacher, but having two felony charges would likely have kept that from happening — until Ohio Governor John Kasich announced he was going to reduce Williams-Bolar's convictions to misdemeanors.

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The Leonard Lopate Show

Crime After Crime

Thursday, June 30, 2011

Director Yoav Potash and Joshua Safran, a lawyer who’s featured in the documentary “Crime After Crime,” talk about the film, which tells the story of a battered woman's decades-long struggle to be released from a wrongful prison sentence. It opens July 1 at IFC Center.

Comments [3]

The Leonard Lopate Show

Hot Coffee and Tort Reform

Monday, June 27, 2011

Filmmaker Susan Saladoff, a former public interest lawyer, talks about her documentary “Hot Coffee,” about the McDonald’s coffee case, which continues to be cited as a prime example of how citizens use “frivolous” lawsuits to take unfair advantage of America’s legal system. But is that an accurate portrayal of the facts? The movie looks at the infamous legal battle that began with a spilled cup of McDonald’s coffee and investigates America’s zeal for tort reform, which, Saladoff argues, could restrict the legal rights of everyday citizens and undermine the entire civil justice system. The documentary debuts June 27 on HBO.

Comments [10]

The Leonard Lopate Show

Backstory: Communications Management Units in Federal Prisons

Thursday, March 17, 2011

In 2006, the Bush Administration opened what are known as Communications Management Units, aimed at isolating inmates thought to have links to terrorist-related activity. Reporter and former Department of Justice Civil Rights Division Attorney Alia Malik describes these facilities, who's being kept under the restrictive conditions there, and why critics question their constitutionality.

 

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The Leonard Lopate Show

Making Bail

Tuesday, January 25, 2011

Jamie Fellner, Senior Counsel, US Program, Human Rights Watch explains how bails are set and the role of bondsmen how bail penalizes the poor.

Comments [18]

The Leonard Lopate Show

From Death Row to Freedom

Friday, October 01, 2010

John Thompson, a wrongfully convicted death row inmate, and lawyer John Hollway discuss the long fight for Thompson’s exoneration. In Killing Time: An 18-Year-Old Odyssey from Death Row to Freedom John Hollway and co-author Ronald M. Gauthier tell the story of the quest for Thompson’s freedom, paint a portrait of life on death row, and reveal the corruption in the Louisiana police and DA’s office.

Comments [6]

The Takeaway

North Carolina Law Allows Death Row Inmates to Claim Racial Bias

Wednesday, September 22, 2010

For years, people have claimed a racial bias in our country’s death penalty system, based on the statistics of who winds up on death row. But, now, a law in North Carolina aims to do something to address such bias when it comes to capital prosecution.

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