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Journalist

Listen to Lucy

Banks should be more like the FT

Monday, May 05, 2014

Banks should be more like the FT

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Strangers

Alfredo Corchado: Midnight in Mexico

Friday, November 15, 2013

An immigrant boy receives an offer he can't refuse. - Get the full story here.

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Listen to Lucy

Grades don’t make the grade at the office

Sunday, May 12, 2013

Grades don’t make the grade at the office

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Here's The Thing

Brian Williams

Monday, March 04, 2013

"No one needs another blowhard yelling at them. No one gives a rat’s patootie about my opinion," the NBC Nightly News anchor tells Alec.

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Annotations: The NEH Preservation Project

William L. Shirer on Nazi Germany After 'The Rise and Fall of the Third Reich'

Monday, December 24, 2012

WNYC

Though it is already two decades after the start of World War II, the shadow of Nazi Germany still looms large over this 1960 talk given by journalist and historian William L. Shirer at a Books and Authors Luncheon. 

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Annotations: The NEH Preservation Project

Jane Jacobs Defends Urbanism in 1960s New York City Planning

Wednesday, October 24, 2012

WNYC

Jane Jacobs, in this 1962 appearance at a Books and Authors Luncheon, explains her current role as a community leader in the fight against what she views as the excesses and excrescences of the arrogant Modernist redesign of city neighborhoods.

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Annotations: The NEH Preservation Project

Foreign Correspondent David Halberstam Analyzes Conflict in Vietnam

Friday, October 12, 2012

WNYC

David Halberstam briefs this 1964 meeting of the Overseas Press Club on what he sees as a "sharp conflict" between America's official optimism and the reality experienced by reporters embedded in Vietnam.

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Here's The Thing

David Brooks

Monday, October 08, 2012

Alec talks with David Brooks on stage at Joe’s Pub. Brooks is known as a Conservative voice, but former Obama advisor David Axelrod described him as a “true public thinker.” 

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Here's The Thing

George Will

Monday, September 24, 2012

Pulitzer-prize winner George Will's passion for politics began early: he remembers Truman’s election when he was just seven years old.

Comments [27]

Annotations: The NEH Preservation Project

William F. Buckley Jr., Mayoral Candidate, on Political Rhetoric and Theater,1965

Wednesday, August 08, 2012

WNYC

Better known for his punditry, here mayoral candidate William F. Buckley Jr. complains about delivering stump speeches "without boring the voter, which is bad enough, but without boring yourself, which is worse." 

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The Brian Lehrer Show

Oscar Nominated Documentaries: "Restrepo"

Monday, May 30, 2011

Sebastian Junger, filmmaker/journalist and author of WAR, and filmmaker/photographer Tim Hetherington, discuss their film about the war in Afghanistan, "Restrepo."

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The Takeaway

'It Was a Nightmare,' Mother of Journalist Released by Gadhafi Forces

Thursday, May 19, 2011

After being held in detention for six weeks, the Libyan government announced on Wednesday that they will release four foreign journalists. Just a day earlier, the Libyan government had sentenced the journalists to one year of captivity on charges of illegally entering the country. And a fifth journalist, Dorothy Parvaz who works for Al Jazeera, arrived safely at the network’s headquarters in Doha after disappearing in Syria and being sent to Iran. We talk with Diane Foley, the mother of James Foley, a reporter for the Global Post who was among the four detained in Libya.

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The Takeaway

Bill Keller on Rescued Reporter Stephen Farrell

Wednesday, September 09, 2009

This morning New York Times reporter Stephen Farrell was rescued by military commandos during a raid in Afghanistan. A British soldier and Farrell's translator, Sultan Munadi, were killed during the rescue. Farrell and his translator were kidnapped on Saturday by a group of Afghan fighters calling themselves the Taliban while reporting on a story in the northern province of Kunduz. The story was kept quiet out of concern that media attention would worsen the situation, so most did not know of the kidnapping. For more of the back story, we talk to New York Times Executive Editor Bill Keller.

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The Takeaway

Life Lessons from Jayson Blair

Friday, August 21, 2009

In early 2003, Jayson Blair went from writing headlines for the New York Times to making headlines when it was discoverd that he had plagiarized dozens of stories. It was a scandal the Times itself called "a low point in the 152-year history of the paper." Blair "resigned under pressure" from the Times shortly thereafter and entered treatment for bipolar disorder. Even after a forced resignation, however, everyone needs to make a living. After such an inglorious and public fall, how would you pick yourself up and start over again?

Well, the hard lessons Jayson Blair learned can be taught to you: for a price, and potentially by Blair himself. He is now working as a life coach. We talk to Jayson Blair along with the man who hired him, Dr. Michael Oberschneider, founder and director at Ashburn Psychological Services.

"For a lot of people who are in mental health recovery, it's very appealing to them to see someone who's fallen so far, and then to see that person from their fate, rebuild. ... The one thing that I can say about crisis: don't make the mistake I did and not reach out for help. If I had reached out to the kind of people who have helped me since I left the Times, before, I probably never would have been in that situation."
—Jayson Blair, ex-reporter for the New York Times, on why his past experiences help him speak authentically as a life coach

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The Takeaway

Don Hewitt: TV Newsman's Legacy in the Internet Age

Thursday, August 20, 2009

It's no kind of overstatement to say that CBS News legend Don Hewitt invented television news. As a producer he helped shape the careers of such respected news luminaries as Edward R. Murrow and Walter Cronkite at a time when broadcast television was just emerging from radio's shadow. He made news into hour-long, genre-spanning programs. Hewitt created 60 Minutes in 1968; the show was a huge success and helped turn correspondents like Morley Safer, Diane Sawyer, and Mike Wallace into household names. His death at 86 comes as another new medium, the internet, looms over the future of existing broadcast and print media. To talk about the life and legacy of Don Hewitt, we talk to New York Times reporter Jacques Steinberg and Hewitt's long time friend and former CBS producer Jeff Gralnick.

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The Takeaway

Journalists in North Korea: The Families' Careful Pleas

Friday, June 05, 2009

American Journalists Laura Ling and Euna Lee have been detained in North Korea since March, after they were accused of illegally crossing the border from China. Their trial was supposed to begin yesterday. If convicted, they could face 10 years of hard labor. The women’s families remained silent for the first two months of their captivity, but this week family members were on the Today Show, Larry King Live, and other programs, appealing for the journalists' release.

Steve Romano, a Former Chief Negotiator for the FBI and now a Senior Advisor with the Center for Personal Protection and Safety, joins The Takeaway to talk about how experts advise families what to say to the press when a loved one is held captive.

Here is some footage of vigils being held for the captive journalists.

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The Takeaway

Iran Frees Journalist Roxana Saberi

Monday, May 11, 2009

Iranian-American journalist Roxana Saberi has just been released from an Iranian prison. Saberi was convicted last month of spying for the United States in a quick trial that was closed to the public. Her incarceration caused an international uproar and President Obama asked for her release. Saberi's lawyer said today that an appeals court in Iran reduced her jail term for spying from eight years to a two-year suspended sentence. For more we turn to New York Times' reporter Nazila Fathi and then to Jon Leyne, the BBC's Tehran correspondent.

Did Irani officials bow to pressure in the Saberi case? For more information, watch this video from the Associated Press.

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WNYC News

Thomas Ricks: Behind General David Petraeus's Gamble

Thursday, February 12, 2009

Pulitzer Prize winning journalist Thomas E. Ricks talks to WNYC's Leonard Lopate about his book, The Gamble, which takes an in-depth look at General Petraeus's surge strategy and the the Iraq War from 2005 on.

You can listen to Lopate and Ricks's complete conversation ...

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Studio 360

Special Guest: Clive Thompson

Saturday, January 29, 2005

Kurt talks to Clive Thompson about art, culture, and video games.

Thompson was ten years old when Pong was unleashed in rec rooms across America and he has been a passionate gamer ever since. Focusing on technology and culture, Thompson contributes regularly to Slate Magazine and NPR. He ...

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Studio 360

Journalist Laura Blumenfeld on Revenge

Saturday, November 30, 2002

Kurt Andersen and journalist Laura Blumenfeld talk about the human desire for revenge. 

Blumenfeld writes for The Washington Post and is the author of Revenge: A Story of Hope.

(Originally aired: May 2, 2002)

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