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Journalism

The Leonard Lopate Show

The Fox Effect

Thursday, March 01, 2012

David Brock and Ari Rabin-Havt of Media Matters for America, look at how Fox News president Roger Ailes has transformed the network. Their book The Fox Effect follows Ailes’ career as a media consultant for Presidents Richard Nixon, Ronald Reagan, and George H. W. Bush to in his current position and his mission, which they say is to spread a partisan political agenda despite the widely held standards of objectivity in news reporting.

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The Takeaway

Death Toll Rises for Journalists in Syria

Thursday, February 23, 2012

Since 1992 seven journalists have been killed in Syria, making it one of the most difficult countries to cover. Last Thursday, Pulitzer Prize-winning New York Times reporter Anthony Shadid died of an asthma attack. Then on Tuesday  tragedy hit three more journalists.  A local videographer, Rami al-Sayed, was killed covering a bombardment. Also, two Western journalists — U.S.-born Marie Colvin and French photojournalist Rémi Ochlik — died when their makeshift media center came under fire.

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WNYC News

As Journalism Changes, Danger Remains

Friday, February 17, 2012

WNYC

The recent death of a New York Times correspondent is a reminder of the risks journalists take to get the story. By one count, 46 journalists were killed last year as a direct result of their work - many in the Middle East.

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On Being

Nicholas Kristof — Journalism and Compassion [remix]

Thursday, February 09, 2012

Can journalism be a humanitarian art? New York Times columnist Nicholas Kristof has learned that reportage can deaden rather than awaken the consciousness, much less the hearts, of his readers. He shares his wide ethical lens he's gained on human

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On Being

[Unedited] Nicholas Kristof with Krista Tippett

Thursday, February 09, 2012

Can journalism be a humanitarian art? New York Times columnist Nicholas Kristof has learned that reportage can deaden rather than awaken the consciousness, much less the hearts, of his readers. He shares his wide ethical lens he's gained on human

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The Takeaway

Remembering Daniel Pearl

Wednesday, February 01, 2012

Ten years ago this week, Wall Street Journal South Asia bureau chief Daniel Pearl was abducted and killed by Pakistani militants. His grisly murder shocked the world, heralding the end of innocence for many foreign correspondents. It also became a rallying cry for those supporting the war on terror as well as those in Afghanistan and Iraq. But for those who actually knew Pearl, it was something else entirely.

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The New Yorker: Out Loud

Peter Hessler on an American crime reporter in Japan

Tuesday, January 03, 2012

Peter Hessler on an American crime reporter in Japan.

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The Takeaway

Should Stephen Glass Be Allowed to Practice Law?

Tuesday, December 27, 2011

Stephen Glass is now a 39-year-old law clerk at a firm in Beverly Hills, California. But more than decade ago, he was a young reporter on the rise. Glass's career in journalism came to an abrupt halt after it was discovered that over 40 of his articles — written for The New Republic, Harpers, Rolling Stone and other well-regarded magazines — were largely fabricated. Glass made up quotes, invented sources, and backed up his work with elaborate fake notes, fake websites, phony email addresses, phone numbers, and voicemail messages. 

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The Leonard Lopate Show

The Lives and Times of Dorothy Thompson and Rebecca West

Wednesday, December 21, 2011

Susan Hertog discusses Dangerous Ambition: Dorothy Thompson and Rebecca West New Women in Search of Love and Power, which chronicles these two women writers who achieved unprecedented fame and influence at tremendous personal cost. American Dorothy Thompson was the first female head of a European news bureau, a columnist and commentator with a tremendous following. Rebecca West, an Englishwoman, was a journalist, literary critic, novelist, and historian. They were drawn to ambitious men.

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Schoolbook

The First Marking Period Is Over. How Did SchoolBook Do?

Wednesday, December 07, 2011

At SchoolBook, we are assessing the site every day, discussing tweaks and larger changes, and testing the experience against our expectations. If we were issuing ourselves a progress report, SchoolBook at three months has probably earned a ... well, you tell us. Meanwhile, here are a few things that are on our agenda for improvement.

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The Leonard Lopate Show

Love and War

Friday, November 25, 2011

War correspondent Janine di Giovanni discusses covering war zones—from Sarajevo to East Timor, from Sierra Leone to Afghanistan, Iraq, and Somalia. Her memoir Ghosts by Daylight: Love, War, and Redemption is an account of her time reporting on war around the world, and of meeting and starting a family with a fellow war reporter. She writes honesty about his struggles with physical and emotional pain, and the toll that takes on their life together.

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Schoolbook

For Student Journalists, Challenges in Putting Out the School Newspaper

Friday, November 04, 2011

Only about half of the city's public high schools have student newspapers, largely because budgets are tight; many new high schools that have not started one yet, and often they are not a priority. But many of those that exist suffer from censorship, their advisers and students say, or at least feel pressure to paint the school in a positive light.

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Talk to Me

Janet Malcolm and Ian Frazier Talk Shop at The New Yorker Festival

Tuesday, October 18, 2011

Journalist Janet Malcolm and New Yorker writer Ian Frazier discussed the nature of the journalist/interviewee relationship, the impact of technology on their work, and early writing projects at The New Yorker Festival.

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Schoolbook

Help Us Cover Stories You Care About

Tuesday, October 11, 2011

Use your cellphone to help us cover the city schools better and add your voice to the conversation.

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The Leonard Lopate Show

Love, War, and Redemption

Wednesday, September 28, 2011

War correspondent Janine di Giovanni discusses covering war zones—from Sarajevo to East Timor, from Sierra Leone to Afghanistan, Iraq, and Somalia. Her memoir Ghosts by Daylight: Love, War, and Redemption is an account of her time reporting on war around the world, and of meeting and starting a family with a fellow war reporter. She writes honesty about his struggles with physical and emotional pain, and the toll that takes on their life together.

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The Leonard Lopate Show

Reporting the News on 9/11

Wednesday, August 31, 2011

Mark Hilan, former host of WNYC's Morning Edition, and  Larry Ingrassia, formerly of the Wall Street Journal and currently Business Editor at the New York Times, discuss having to make sense of the events on 9/11 both personally, and professionally, on the fly. Larry Ingrassia was part of the team that set up a newsroom within a few hours after the attacks and helped put together the Pulitzer Prize-winning edition of the Wall Street Journal. Mark Hilan helped keep WNYC on the air and brought people news of the events that morning.

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The Takeaway

The Life and Legacy of Stetson Kennedy

Monday, August 29, 2011

The scars and legacy of racism in America and poverty has ways of bubbling up to the surface in surprising ways.  Today that legacy shows up in the story of the life and death of a famous American folklorist, journalist and author, Stetson Kennedy, who died at the age of 94 over the weekend. Kennedy became famous for allegedly infiltrating the Ku Klux Klan as an undercover journalist, then exposing their secrets in a book, “I Rode with the Ku Klux Klan,” which was published in 1954. He spoke with This American Life's Ira Glass about his experience, in 2005.

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The Takeaway

Can Hurricane Hype be a Danger to Public Safety?

Monday, August 29, 2011

Natural disasters require an incredible effort on the part of medical professionals, police, fire departments, Good Samaritans — and the media. Reporting on storms, especially hurricanes, means much more to media outlets than simple public safety information. These storms can mean big ratings, major awards, and they can make or break a reporter's career — as with The Weather Channel's Mike Seidel. Unfortunately, media histrionics can also be counterproductive to public safety.

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The Leonard Lopate Show

Brooke Gladstone on the Murdoch Hacking Scandal

Wednesday, July 27, 2011

On the Media’s Brooke Gladstone gives a rundown of the Rupert Murdoch phone hacking scandal and looks at how it’s been covered by the media, how far and wide the scandal has spread, and what the repercussions of it will be in the British press, government, and here in the United States.

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