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On The Media

What’s a Health Journalist To Do?

Friday, May 23, 2014

Resveratrol is a chemical in red wine that, over the years, has been both heralded as heart healing and dismissed as bogus by the media. While this head-spinning trajectory is the norm in health reporting, it's enough to make health and science reporter Virginia Hughes question her profession. Brooke speaks with Hughes about the perils of reporting on the latest health news.

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The Brian Lehrer Show

Bill Moyers on the Act of Bearing Witness

Thursday, May 15, 2014

Bill Moyers, veteran journalist and host of Moyers & Company, talks about his four-decade career in broadcast journalism and the responsibility that comes with bearing witness to history.

 

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The Brian Lehrer Show

Watergate Revisited with Elizabeth Drew

Thursday, May 15, 2014

Forty years after the first and only resignation of an American president, Elizabeth Drew, veteran reporter and author of Washington Journal: Reporting Watergate and Richard Nixon's Downfall (Overlook Hardcover, 2014), looks back and asks if we've learned the important lessons.

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The Takeaway

Ukrainian Journalists Navigate the Fog of War

Tuesday, May 13, 2014

For Ukrainian journalists in the middle of it all, political pressure and violence plague their quest to tell the stories of the Ukrainian people, and the future of the nation.

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The Leonard Lopate Show

Civil Eats: Promoting Sustainable Agriculture and Food Systems

Tuesday, May 06, 2014

Paula Crossfield, editor-at-large of Civil Eats, and Naomi Starkman, editor-in-chief, discuss creating the web site, which is a daily news source for critical thought about the American food system and was just awarded the Publication of the Year Award by the James Beard Foundation. Founded in January 2009, Civil Eats is a community resource of over 100 contributors who are shifting the conversation around sustainable agriculture in an effort to build economically and socially just communities.

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The Leonard Lopate Show

The Poverty Beat

Monday, April 21, 2014

For this week’s installment of our series Strapped: A Look at Poverty in America, Dale Maharidge, Pulitzer Prize-winning journalist and Columbia Journalism School professor, and Greg Kaufmann, senior fellow at the Center for American Progress and former poverty correspondent for The Nation, discuss reporting on poverty and how poverty is portrayed—and why it’s under-covered—in the media. Kaufman is launching TalkPoverty.org on May 19.

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The Leonard Lopate Show

Dexter Filkins: Covering War Distorts Everything

Tuesday, April 15, 2014

The New Yorker staff writer tells guest host Sarah Jessica Parker about his experiences covering war in Afghanistan, Pakistan and Iraq.

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On The Media

Let's All Just Sit This April Fools' Day Out

Tuesday, April 01, 2014

If you read anything today that strains credulity or activates your sense of wonder, you should try to find a second source for it.

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The Leonard Lopate Show

Tributes: Joe McGinniss

Monday, March 17, 2014

Joe McGinniss had a nose for news, and was tireless in pursuing, and immersing himself in stories, be it then-presidential candidate Richard Nixon (The Selling of the President 1968) or 2008 vice presidential candidate Sarah Palin (The Rogue).  Along with Joan Didion and Tom Wolfe, he was known as one of the writers of New Journalism.  He died recently at the age of 71.  He spoke to Leonard in April 2009 for his story about the deal that Palin struck to build a $40 billion pipeline, which had little chance of being built. 

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On The Media

Calling for Back Up

Friday, March 07, 2014

Despite the seizure of their office and most of their files and equipment by masked gunmen, the journalists at the Crimean Center for Investigative Journalism were prepared: over the weekend they had backed up their entire web history through the Archive-It service from the Internet ArchiveDavid E. Kaplan, executive director of the Global Investigative Journalism Network and one of the coordinators of the effort, tells Bob just how they managed to pull it off. You can check out what they've saved here and here.

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On The Media

The State of Crimean Journalism

Friday, March 07, 2014

Last weekend, as Russian troops flooded into Crimea, Ukraine, 30 armed men in unmarked fatigues broke into the office of the Crimean Center for Investigative Journalism in the region's capital. The incident is one of many recent acts of aggression against journalists in the region.

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On The Media

The Pseudonymous Man Behind Bitcoin Has Been Found, and He's Not a Pseudonym

Thursday, March 06, 2014

Long thought to be a pseudonym, journalists have pointed the finger at economists, cryptographers and mathematicians as possible people behind the digital currency. Until now. Maybe.

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The Brian Lehrer Show

Radiolab on "Neither Confirm Nor Deny"

Wednesday, February 26, 2014

Reporter Julia Barton and Jad Abumrad, co-host of Radiolab, explain the story behind the phrase "we can neither confirm nor deny" -- also known as "The Glomar Response" -- and how it has come to frustrate so many journalists and others seeking official information.

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On The Media

No, US Press Freedom Is Not In Dire Decline

Friday, February 14, 2014

This week, the advocacy group Reporters Without Borders released its annual World Press Freedom Index, ranking the media environment of nearly every nation on earth from most free to least. The United States landed, embarrassingly, in 46th place, a 13-place drop from last year. The rank -- below Lithuania, El Salvador and Botswana -- has set off a panic-stricken (and in some instances, gleeful) barrage of media coverage declaring that press freedom in the US is “plunging,” “plummeting,” and “profoundly eroding.” Bob talks with Washington Post foreign affairs blogger Max Fisher about why he's suspicious of these headlines. 

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The Leonard Lopate Show

Book Club: Random Family

Thursday, January 30, 2014

Leonard Lopate Show Book Club’s first selection for 2014 is Random Family: Love, Drugs, Trouble, and Coming of Age in the Bronx. Author Adrian Nicole LeBlanc spent years with one extended family in the Bronx to create a portrait of poverty, and of life in and of public housing, prison, and court. It received high praise when it was published in 2003, and remains as relevant and important a decade later. We chose it after we read Andrea Elliott's powerful New York Times series Invisible Child: Dasani's Homeless Life, which reminded us of the extensive reporting on a family's struggles with poverty in Random Family.

Share your thoughts and questions below!

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On The Media

The Obamacare Horror Story

Friday, January 10, 2014

During the tumultuous roll-out of the Affordable Care Act, the media struggled to find stories of people who had successfully bought insurance through healthcare.gov, and many landed on sources that turned out to be unreliable. But now, another dubious narrative is all the rage: the Obamacare horror story. Bob talks to health policy writer Maggie Mahar, who is very suspicious of the nightmarish tales reported in the media. 

 

 

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The Leonard Lopate Show

The Need for Knowledge-Based Journalism

Thursday, December 12, 2013

Thomas E. Patterson argues that today’s journalists are not providing trustworthy and relevant news and that reporters too often give equal weight to facts and biased opinion, stir up small controversies, and substitute “infotainment” for real news. In Informing the News: The Need for Knowledge-Based Journalism, Patterson looks at the problems with the press’s eroding quality, and he proposes a corrective. Patterson is a professor in the Joan Shorenstein Center on the Press, Politics, and Public Policy at Harvard University’s John F. Kennedy School of Government.

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The Leonard Lopate Show

Improving the News; "Macbeth"; Bruce McCall on Billionaire Spending; Squirrels in NYC; Factory Farms

Thursday, December 12, 2013

Kennedy School of Government professor Thomas E. Patterson argues that journalists today aren’t providing enough trustworthy and relevant reporting, and he suggests how we can make knowledge-based journalism a reality. Ethan Hawke, Anne-Marie Duff, and director Jack O’Brien talk about the Lincoln Center Theater’s production of “Macbeth.” Bruce McCall discusses collaborating with David Letterman on their satirical chronicle of the super-rich. We’ll find out how New York City became infested with gray squirrels. And we’ll look at how animals live—and die—in factory farms across America.

The Brian Lehrer Show

Support the Elaine Rivera Scholarship in Journalism

Monday, December 09, 2013

Former WNYC reporter Elaine Rivera recently died at the age of 54. The community of journalists and students she worked with are banding together to establish a scholarship fund to support young journalists at Lehman College, where Elaine taught. Here's how to support the efforts.

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WNYC News

Covering Mandela: A Journalist Reflects

Friday, December 06, 2013

The passing of Nelson Mandela has the entire world reflecting on his influence — positive and negative.

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