Streams

 

Jocelyn Montgomery

New Sounds

Voices and Soundscapes

Sunday, November 09, 2014

Hear music from the duo, White Canvas, whose world of sound moves between song, avant-garde and improvisation, with vocal lines over guitar-based soundscapes.

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New Sounds

Medieval + Electronic = ?

Monday, April 14, 2014

This New Sounds explores the equation of medieval + electronic = ?  Hear ecstatic melodies from the 12th century German composer abbess mystic Hildegard of Bingen in a contemporary context.  There are many versions of her “O Viridissima Virga,” incorporating modern electronics and sound design from the likes of Jocelyn Montgomery and David Lynch to arranger and producer Richard Souther. There’s also a version from the Korean-Amercian Bora Yoon as well, from her latest, “Sunken Cathedral.” Yoon's settings are ominous and disorienting when she transports these Hildegard songs into her electronic sound-world. 

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New Sounds

Voices and Soundscapes

Tuesday, October 15, 2013

Hear music from the duo, White Canvas, whose world of sound moves between song, avant-garde and improvisation, with vocal lines over guitar-based soundscapes. The title of their record is taken from texts by the Sufi mystic and poet, Jalaluddin Rumi - “There are hundreds of ways to kneel and kiss the ground.”  Also, Jocelyn Montgomery (Miranda Sex Garden) and David Lynch arrange music by the 12th-century abbess Hildegard von Bingen. Listen to Montgomery’s sublime renditions from a recording called Lux Vivens.  And more.

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New Sounds

Voices and Soundscapes

Monday, July 02, 2012

Hear music from the duo, White Canvas, whose world of sound moves between song, avant-garde and improvisation, with vocal lines over guitar-based soundscapes. The title of their record is taken from texts by the Sufi mystic and poet, Jalaluddin Rumi - “There are hundreds of ways to kneel and kiss the ground.”  Also, Jocelyn Montgomery (Miranda Sex Garden) and David Lynch arrange music by the 12th-century abbess Hildegard von Bingen. Listen to Montgomery’s sublime renditions from a recording called Lux Vivens.  And more.

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