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Japan Tsunami

The Takeaway

The Future of Nuclear Energy One Year After the Fukushima Meltdown

Friday, March 09, 2012

One year ago this Sunday a massive earthquake devastated northeast Japan. The Japanese barely had time to catch their breath before waves of water 30 feet high crashed down on the coast. Twenty-thousand people died; 90,000 were evacuated. The natural disasters were soon followed by a nuclear crisis. In the year since the meltdown at the Fukushima Daiichi plant, Japan has had to face difficult questions on the state of their nuclear regulations and the country’s energy future.

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The Takeaway

Earthquake Rattles East Coast, As Hurricane Heads for U.S.

Wednesday, August 24, 2011

A very rare event happened In the northeastern part of the United States yesterday. A 5.8 magnitude earthquake centered in Mineral, Virginia sent tremors outward, all the way north to New York and New England, and south to North Carolina. Limited damage was reported and some even found the event to be exciting. The earthquake follows a number of natural disasters we have witnessed this year, including Japan's massive quake and tsunami, tornadoes ravaging southern states and the Mississippi River rising to historic levels, flooding cities in its path. And now Hurricane Irene, which experts predict could turn into a category 4 storm, and may hit Florida on Friday.

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The Brian Lehrer Show

Portrayals of Japanese

Tuesday, April 05, 2011

Ian Buruma, a frequent contributor to The New York Review of Books and a Henry R. Luce professor at Bard College, discusses media portrayals of Japanese people following the earthquake and tsunami -- and the distinction between cultural differences and cultural stereotypes.

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The Takeaway

After the Quake: Aftershocks

Wednesday, March 30, 2011

We’ve heard the reports and told the stories of Japan, how it’s facing its worst crisis since World War II, about a death toll in the tens of thousands, the massive destruction of entire cities, and continuing threats of nuclear meltdown. Now, here’s more terrifying news: The threat of earthquakes hasn’t gone away — it has increased. Thomas Jordan is the Director of the Southern California Earthquake Center. And his work shows that Japan is under an increased threat for aftershocks. He appears in a new NOVA special "Japan's Killer Quake," which premiers tonight on PBS. Collum Macrae is one of the producers of the documentary.

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The Takeaway

Japan: Dispatch from Takata

Tuesday, March 22, 2011

Tens of thousands of people in Northern Japan remain homeless following the quake and tsunami that devastated its country. The city of Takata was hit particularly hard by tragedy. The town, home to 22,000 people before the tsunami, lost 2,000 in the disaster. BBC reporter Roland Buerk is in Takata, where the recovery process has begun. 

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Features

NYC Events Raise Funds for Japanese Disaster Relief

Tuesday, March 22, 2011

More than a week after the March 11 earthquake hit, eyes, hearts and browser windows have been trained on Japan. Here is a list of events happening around the city to raise funds.

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The Takeaway

Japan Relief: Helping the Most Vulnerable

Monday, March 21, 2011

The tsunami came too quickly. Japan's coastal towns had only a 30-minute warning, which was barely enough time to escape the wave, and for many disabled citizens, not enough time at all. The disabled are among the most vulnerable victims of the recent destruction in Japan. Yukiko and Shoji Nakanishi are members of a Japanese relief organization that is working tirelessly to provide shelter and evacuation support to northern Japan's disabled populations. 

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WNYC News

New Yorkers Solicit Donations for Japan Relief

Monday, March 21, 2011

Some New Yorkers are taking to the streets to raise money for disaster relief in Japan following the March 11 earthquake and tsunami.

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The Takeaway

Washington Juggles Libya No-Fly Zone, Japan Crisis

Friday, March 18, 2011

Washington is facing two major foreign policy situations. The U.N. Security Council has voted to act broadly in Libya, imposing a no-fly zone and even leaving open other forms of conflict in order to protect the civilian population. With ten member states voting for the measure and five abstaining, it is an historic move in a complicated region. And in Japan, a dire nuclear threat continues while survivors of last weekend's earthquake and tsunami struggle to find food and shelter. How is Washington tackling these two situations? 

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The Takeaway

Fukushima and the Fallout

Thursday, March 17, 2011

The situation at the Fukushima Power Plant in Japan continues to worsen. U.S. Media is reporting that water levels are dropping in more than one of the six reactors at the plant, leaving nuclear fuel rods exposed. The United States Nuclear Regulatory Commission has warned that Japanese regulators may be downplaying the risk of radiation levels at the plant; and the commission has advised that Americans evacuate the area within 30 miles of Fukushima.

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The Takeaway

The Japanese Government's Response to Disaster

Thursday, March 17, 2011

The chairman of the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission has given a much more dire analysis of the nuclear threat bearing down on Japan than Japanese officials. Gregory Jaczko told Congress yesterday that the damage to at least one reactor at the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Plant was more serious than Tokyo has described, and suggested Americans in that country stay at least 50 miles away — well above the Japanese evacuation area of 12 miles from the plant.

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The Takeaway

Faceless 50: When Workers Face Extraordinary Responsibilities

Thursday, March 17, 2011

The world’s eyes are on the "Faceless 50" workers at Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Station as they struggle to keep potential radiation leaks under control. Though the workers' identities are unknown, their incredibly stressful task has captured our imaginations. The United States also has people working in fields where the willingness to risk your life in a catastrophe is part of the deal. Is it worth it? And who gets left behind to fight the good fight? 

For the past several days, the world’s eyes have been on the workers at the Fukushima nuclear plant. Although for now they are nameless and faceless, they’ve captured our imaginations and made us think: what does it take to do that job?   
We decided to take a look at the people here in the United States working in fields where risking your life in a large-scale catastrophe is part of the deal. 
With us is Andrew Kadak, who joined us two days ago as an expert in nuclear engineering and science, but ALSO worked at a nuclear power plant in Massachusetts and served as its CEO for many years. Hi, Andrew. 
Also joining us is Davitt McAteer, Vice President of Sponsored Programs at Wheeling Jesuit University. He’s had a long career in mining safety and health, and is currently heading the investigation of Upper Big Branch Mine disaster in W. Virginia. Welcome Davitt. 

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Features

Sushi Restaurants Drum Up Money for Japanese Disaster Relief

Wednesday, March 16, 2011

WNYC

Manhattan's SushiSamba has raised $8,000 from selling its "Japan Relief Roll." Sushi Azabu is donating proceeds from an upcoming dinner to the Japanese Red Cross. Sushi Zen is collecting money in a donation box in its window.

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The Takeaway

After the Disaster in Japan, When Comments Go Too Far

Wednesday, March 16, 2011

While Japan is dealing with a rising death toll, massive destruction and a nuclear crisis in the wake of a devastating 9.0 earthquake and tsunami, some prominent media personalities, athletes and celebrities in the United States have found themselves apologizing for making insensitive comments about the tragedy. Jeff Yang, pop culture columnist, discusses the cultural implications of such remarks.

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The Takeaway

Japan Earthquake: An Eyewitness Account

Tuesday, March 15, 2011

Our friends at LAPM's LA>FWD posted these videos of Mio Kanehara, a 22-year-old aspiring singer in Tokyo, talking about her experience during the recent earthquake off the coast of Japan. Check them out after the jump.

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It's A Free Country ®

Former GE VP: Japan Comparable to Three Mile Island

Tuesday, March 15, 2011

"We're talking of numbers on the order of what you would receive getting a cat scan or getting other diagnostic x-rays done over the course of your lifetime, so you have those done without fear, I believe that there's no fear in an increase of radiation here."

-Former GE VP Margaret Harding, on the scale of Japan's nuclear crisis

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The Brian Lehrer Show

Sanjay Gupta in Japan

Tuesday, March 15, 2011

Dr. Sanjay Gupta, CNN’s chief medical correspondent, reports from Tokyo on the mental and physical health of the Japanese victims.

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The Takeaway

Japan: Managing a Disaster

Tuesday, March 15, 2011

A third explosion has rocked Japan's Fukushima Daiichi power plant, in what is being called the worst nuclear disaster since Chernobyl. Residents living nearby have been evacuated and emergency workers were removed from the plant. With fears of radiation exposure and a full meltdown, workers are continuing to pump seawater on the reactors in an effort to continue the cooling process. 

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The Takeaway

Crisis and Devastation in Japan

Tuesday, March 15, 2011

The crisis at the Fukushima Daiichi power plant is being called the worst nuclear crisis since Chernobyl. There have been explosions at three reactors. Meanwhile, radiation levels are on the rise. Takeaway listeners have expressed concern about nuclear reactors near them. David from Manhattan wrote on our website: I live in NYC, near enough or downwind of many. I'm concerned because unlike other materials, nuclear material's toxicity doesn't simply dilute away over time. A release of nuclear material is necessarily a disaster.

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The Takeaway

After the Tsunami, Dispatch from a Coastal Town

Tuesday, March 15, 2011

Thousands of people along the Japanese coasts trying to pick up with their lives. The BBC's Rachel Harvey traveled through Minamisanriku, one of the coastal towns flattened by the tsunami. It's also the town where at least 1000 bodies have washed up so far. Even amidst the rubble and the ruin, she finds survivors who are gathering up any belongings that weren't destroyed.

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