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Japan Quake

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Japan Quake • A Timeline

Monday, March 14, 2011

Following the 8.9 magnitude earthquake and subsequent tsunami on the east coast of Japan, the country is now racing to prevent a nuclear disaster at a major nuclear power plant. Below is a time line of events in Japan local time. (Updated 8:30 p.m. EST) •

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It's A Free Country ®

GE's Japan Connection May Have Financial and Political Ramifications

Tuesday, March 15, 2011

Stocks of GE declined in early trading on Tuesday because of concerns about the company’s connection to the nuclear reactors that are at risk of meltdown in the aftermath of the earthquake in Japan.

GE designed the six reactors at the Fukushima Dalichi nuclear power plant, where a third explosion erupted on Tuesday morning, which may have breached a reactor's inner containment vessels.

Now, nuclear experts are watching closely to see how well the earthquake-battered containment systems are containing radiation.

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The Takeaway

Simon Winchester on Living with Natural Disaster

Tuesday, March 15, 2011

Man lives on the earth with geological consent, writes Simon Winchester, author of "Atlantic: Great Sea Battles, Heroic Discoveries, Titanic Storms,and a Vast Ocean of a Million Stories." Winchester has written extensively about geology and weighs in on the Japan quake and whether we are prepared for disaster here in the United States. He says that the earth is littered with the ruins of cities built in precarious locations and further, that it is the instability of the planet which has created some of its most beautiful features (and most coveted property).

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The Takeaway

Voice from Tokyo

Tuesday, March 15, 2011

Brett Larner and his wife Mika Tokariarin live in central Tokyo, however Mika's parents live near the Fukushima power plant. Brett and his wife are hoping that his in-laws will come stay with them in Tokyo. But with the current evacuation zone at 20 kilometers away from the plant, his in-laws have opted to stay as they live 130 kilometers away. They are both 73 years old and their home was damaged.

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The Brian Lehrer Show

Sanjay Gupta in Japan

Tuesday, March 15, 2011

Dr. Sanjay Gupta, CNN’s chief medical correspondent, reports from Tokyo on the mental and physical health of the Japanese victims.

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WNYC News

Stocks Plunge as Japan Nuclear Crisis Worsens

Tuesday, March 15, 2011

Stock prices took an early, steep move down today, after Tokyo shares plunged. The Dow has been down about 200 points at midday.

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The Takeaway

Google Crisis Response Team in Action

Tuesday, March 15, 2011

This tragedy and disaster in Japan is framed by a moment in technological history. The tsunami waves were recorded from helicopters with cameras, images of the earth shaking office buildings and street signs and the heart wrenching images of the devastation are sweeping the world. Technology has also enabled numerous tools and datasets that have become another way of following what is happening in Japan. Google has set up a crisis response page to help those affected by the crisis. Prem Ramaswami, product manager with Google.org's crisis response team explains what they have done. Ramaswami says that crisis mapping is key in getting help to those who need it.

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The Takeaway

Japan: Managing a Disaster

Tuesday, March 15, 2011

A third explosion has rocked Japan's Fukushima Daiichi power plant, in what is being called the worst nuclear disaster since Chernobyl. Residents living nearby have been evacuated and emergency workers were removed from the plant. With fears of radiation exposure and a full meltdown, workers are continuing to pump seawater on the reactors in an effort to continue the cooling process. 

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The Takeaway

Japan Earthquake's Global Impact

Tuesday, March 15, 2011

Last week’s earthquake off the coast of Japan measured 9.0 magnitude, which makes it the fourth most powerful earthquake on record worldwide. Earth's poles shifted by more than 3 inches, Japan moved 12-13 feet closer to Hawaii, and the earth’s day is now 1.8 microseconds shorter.

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WNYC News

Nuclear Power Play: A Look at the Industry in the Tri-State

Tuesday, March 15, 2011

The Japanese nuclear power catastrophe is bringing additional scrutiny to the industry in the tri-state area, which is perhaps more reliant on it than any other mutli-state region in the country.

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The Takeaway

Crisis and Devastation in Japan

Tuesday, March 15, 2011

The crisis at the Fukushima Daiichi power plant is being called the worst nuclear crisis since Chernobyl. There have been explosions at three reactors. Meanwhile, radiation levels are on the rise. Takeaway listeners have expressed concern about nuclear reactors near them. David from Manhattan wrote on our website: I live in NYC, near enough or downwind of many. I'm concerned because unlike other materials, nuclear material's toxicity doesn't simply dilute away over time. A release of nuclear material is necessarily a disaster.

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The Takeaway

After the Tsunami, Dispatch from a Coastal Town

Tuesday, March 15, 2011

Thousands of people along the Japanese coasts trying to pick up with their lives. The BBC's Rachel Harvey traveled through Minamisanriku, one of the coastal towns flattened by the tsunami. It's also the town where at least 1000 bodies have washed up so far. Even amidst the rubble and the ruin, she finds survivors who are gathering up any belongings that weren't destroyed.

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The Takeaway

How Japan's Earthquake Altered the Earth's Time

Tuesday, March 15, 2011

The earthquake in Japan devastated a country, but it also had a geological effect on the earth, changing the length of our days. According to physicists at NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory, last week’s earthquake actually resulted in our days being shortened by 1.8 microseconds. Dr. Jean Dickey, a physicist with NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory explains that the mass of the earth changed in such a way that the rotation changed. However, she says that the days change fairly often following atmospheric changes and that, while the earthquake had a devastating effect on Japan, the length of the day is not something to be concerned about.

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The Takeaway

Nuclear America: Georgia Mayor Says Japan Nuke Catastrophe Can't Happen Here

Tuesday, March 15, 2011

One year ago, President Obama announced that the federal government would guarantee $8 billion in new federal loans to build two nuclear reactors in Georgia. The recession-hit town of Waynesboro, Georgia was to benefit from the construction, as new jobs were created. But as Japan's nuclear disaster continues to unfold, some of those who live near the 104 nuclear reactors scattered throughout the United States are growing nervous, while others say there's nothing to fear.

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WQXR Features

After Quake, Japanese Performers Arrive for Carnegie Hall Festival

Monday, March 14, 2011

Faced with aftershocks, transportation gridlock and canceled rehearsals following the massive earthquake and tsunami, members of Bach Collegium Japan boarded a flight to the U.S. on Sunday.

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It's A Free Country ®

The Local Politics of Closing Nuclear Power Plants

Monday, March 14, 2011

While nuclear power has enjoyed a resurgence of bipartisan support in Washington — like in this 2009 op-ed from Sens. John Kerry (D-MA) and Lindsay Graham (R-SC) — the local politics around nuclear energy have remained charged. In both New Jersey and New York, leaders have been looking for exit plans for their decades-old nuclear plants.

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It's A Free Country ®

Cautious Reconsideration, Not Rejection, of Nuclear Energy in Washington

Monday, March 14, 2011

Last year, President Obama was calling investment in new nuclear power plants “a necessity.” He reiterated his call for nuclear investment in his State of the Union this year and in his budget proposal, which calls for $36 billion in loan guarantees for new nuclear construction.  

Then, in the last 72 hours, two hydrogen explosions rocked Japan in the aftermath of the devastating tsunami and earthquake.

Now, Washington is readying its response, with key lawmakers urging caution, rather than a reconsideration, of domestic nuclear policy.

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WNYC News

A Look at the Tri-State's Active Fault Line

Monday, March 14, 2011

The Ramapo Fault is the longest fault in the Northeast that occasionally makes local headlines when minor tremors cause rock the Tri-State region. It begins in Pennsylvania, crosses the Delaware River and continues through Hunterdon, Somerset, Morris, Passaic and Bergen counties before crossing the Hudson River near Indian Point nuclear facility.

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Features

Despite Quake, Japanese Arts Festival at Carnegie Will Go On

Monday, March 14, 2011

Deerhoof, the indie rock band led by Tokyo-born singer Satomi Matsuzaki, kicked off JapanNYC at Carnegie Hall with a concert on Monday night.

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It's A Free Country ®

The Nuclear Conversation, Post-Quake

Monday, March 14, 2011

The earthquake and tsunami just overwhelmed these systems. They evacuated 180,000 people, and I think even senators like Joe Lieberman, who have been pretty favorably disposed to nuclear, said we need to put a halt to new plants in this country until we understand exactly what the failure modes have been in these Japanese plants.

Joseph Romm, senior fellow at Center for American Progress and founder of the blog, ClimateProgress.org on the Brian Lehrer Show.

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WNYC News

For New York, A Slim Chance of Quake Damage

Monday, March 14, 2011

Given that New York City is a coastal metropolis only a few dozen miles downriver from a nuclear power plant, the recent disaster in Japan raises some questions about what impact seismic activity would have on our neck of the woods.

More: A Look at the Tri-State's Active Fault Line

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