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The Brian Lehrer Show

Tsunami Warnings

Friday, March 11, 2011

Gregory C. Beroza, professor & associate chair for Graduate Studies at the Earthquake Seismology Group at Stanford University, provides continuing coverage of the tsunamis generated by the earthquake off the coast of Japan.

Japan Earthquake and Tsunamis: Links, Videos, Resources

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WNYC News

Hundreds Killed in Tsunami After 8.9 Quake Hits Japan

Friday, March 11, 2011

A powerful tsunami spawned by the largest earthquake in Japan’s recorded history slammed the eastern coast Friday, sweeping away boats, cars, homes and people as widespread fires burned out of control. Japan's police said between 200 to 300 bodies were found in the northeastern coastal area.

VIDEO: TSUNAMI SWEEPS INLAND

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World Weekly with Gideon Rachman

Japan's earthquake; intervention in Libya; eurozone debt; and the Dalai Lama

Thursday, March 10, 2011

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The Takeaway

Ratings Agencies Make Bold Changes on Pension Debt

Friday, January 28, 2011

Credit rating agencies took some bold steps on Thursday, downgrading growth forecasts and cutting debt ratings both in the U.S. and abroad. Moody's Investors Service announced Thursday they will begin to take unfunded pension debt into account when formulating states' credit ratings — a move that could have a debilitating affect on struggling states. On the same day, Fitch Ratings cut their growth forecast for Tunisia by two percent in light of domestic political upheaval that has swept across the Middle East, and Standard and Poor's downgraded Japan's long-term government debt for the first time since 2002. What does this mean for countries, states, and the international economy?

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The Takeaway

Continued Calls for Apologies, Compensation for WWII 'Comfort Women'

Wednesday, January 05, 2011

One of the few remaining Korean women who Japanese troops forced into sexual slavery during World War II has died. Advocates for the few still alive say Japan should officially apologize and compensate the "comfort women." Dr. Katherine H.S. Moon is a professor of political science at Wellesley College and author of “Sex Among Allies: Military Prostitution in U.S.-Korea Relations." She elucidates the history of the women and the underlying tensions that likely makes a Japanese apology out of the question.

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The Takeaway

Japan's Military Priorities Now Focus on China

Friday, December 17, 2010

A national review of Japan's military forces has resulted in a change in their focus: potential threats to stability coming from China. Japanese leaders now see the military of their gargantuan neighbor as a threat to stability in the region, along with North Korea. China replied this morning to the review, condemning the move. Will the review and new focus on defense against China be a source of tension between the two countries? For more on the story we're joined by Roland Buerk, who is reporting for our partner the BBC in Tokyo. 

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The Takeaway

President Obama's Quiet Agenda in Asia

Tuesday, November 09, 2010

President Obama arrived in Indonesia this morning, for the second stop on his 10-day trip in Asia. As he meets with world leaders in India, Indonesia, South Korea and Japan, the President will talk about global security, international trade and economics, improving cultural ties, diplomatic efforts and preventing terrorism. But some issues will be conspicuously missing from his public agenda.

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The Takeaway

This Week's Agenda: Peace Talks; Bishop Jones; China and Japan Relations Deteriorate

Monday, September 27, 2010

Israel's partial freeze on settlement buliding in the West Bank ended last night, and Marcus Mabry, associate national editor for The New York Times, and Charlie Herman, economics editor for The Takeaway and WNYC Radio, discuss how this will affect peace talks between Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu and Palestinian President Mahmoud Abbas.  They'll also take a look at what's ahead this week for Bishop Eddie Long, who has been accused of trying to sexually seduce four teenage boys; President Obama's continued conversations with middle-class Americans; how China and Japan's relationship is rapidly deteriorating, and more.

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The Takeaway

Japan Releases Chinese Fishing Boat Captain

Friday, September 24, 2010

One of the worst diplomatic disputes in years between the two most influential Asian nations is coming to an end. Japan is releasing the captain of a Chinese fishing boat captain who was detained after his ship collided with Japanese coastguards earlier this month. The Japanese said the collision was "deliberate, but not pre-meditated." Roland Burke, of our partner, the BBC, reports from Tokyo.

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World Weekly with Gideon Rachman

The far right in Sweden, arms in the Middle East and China's relationship with Japan

Thursday, September 23, 2010

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The Takeaway

China Passes Japan as Second Largest Economy

Monday, August 16, 2010

China’s economy has been steadily growing over the past three decades, bypassing countries like Great Britian, Germany and France. And last night, the country took a major economic leap: China is now the world’s second largest economy, behind only the United States. The milestone was reached after Japan announced a slightly smaller second quarter value than China.

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WQXR News

U.S. Joins Hiroshima A-bomb Memorial

Friday, August 06, 2010

A U.S. representative participated for the first time Friday in Japan's annual commemoration of the American atomic bombing of Hiroshima, in a 65th anniversary event that organizers hope will bolster global efforts toward nuclear disarmament.

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WQXR News

Spacecraft Returns After Touching Asteroid

Monday, June 14, 2010

After a 7 year, 4-billion mile journey, a Japanese spacecraft has returned to earth, potentially with asteroid samples that could provide clues into the evolution of the solar system.

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WQXR News

Japan Appoints New Prime Minister

Friday, June 04, 2010

Naoto Kan has been installed as Japan's new prime minister, following the resignation of Yukio Hatoyama earlier this week.

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Transportation Nation

Dreaming of the Fastest Trains

Tuesday, May 11, 2010

Ray LaHood visiting Japan's high-speed rail

(Collin Campbell, Transportation Nation) - Ever since President Obama announced billions in funding for high-speed rail projects in the U.S. early this year, the excitement over a transformation of transportation has built.  But the projects being funded by that money have also abused the definition of "high-speed" a bit.  Most of the money is going to improving on-time performance in places like Chicago and Seattle, as well as speeding up trains across the country, and not to rates that will blow your socks off.

And even the marquee high-speed rail projects in California and Florida aren't likely to deliver what Secretary Ray LaHood called "the thrill of a lifetime" today.  That's him above riding a MAGLEV train in Japan (above), with Central Japan Railway Chairman Yoshiaki Kasai.  It's a train that actually floats above its rails, and can hit over 350 mph.  Japan only has a short route running now -- it's incredibly expensive to build -- by they plan to have a web, speedily connecting major cities by mid-century.  The technology has been universally ruled too expensive to build in the U.S., at least with stimulus funds.

It's technology and photo-ops like this that Central Japan Railway, the company making MAGLEV and other high-speed trains for export to the U.S., hopes will get it the multi-million dollar contracts to set up the California and Florida's rail systems.  They've also hired people like Richard Lawless, a seasoned veteran of the CIA and State Department, to navigate the corridors of Washington and get federal backing to beat off competing proposals from Spain's Talgo or Germany's Siemens.  The world is still waiting to hear who will build America's (semi) high-speed future.

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The Takeaway

In More Ways Than One, Communication Problems Plague Toyota

Thursday, February 25, 2010

Toyota CEO Akio Toyoda testified on Capitol Hill yesterday, sounding contrite and several times apologizing for the problems that have plagued his company. Toyoda stressed Toyota's commitment to safety, and, at one point, spoke directly to the families of Toyota drivers who were killed when their cars accelerated out of control. The hearing lasted approximately three hours and Toyoda faced tough questioning from lawmakers, but appeared to be hindered at times by an inability to understand his questioners.

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The Takeaway

Japan Reacts to the Congressional Hearing on Toyota

Wednesday, February 24, 2010

The president of Japanese car giant Toyota will appear before Congress today as part of a probe into the company's recall of millions of vehicles over sudden acceleration problems, which have been blamed for about 30 U.S. deaths.

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The Takeaway

Toyota CEO to Testify on Capitol Hill

Wednesday, February 24, 2010

The CEO of Toyota, Akio Toyoda, will testify before Congress today as part of a probe into his company's massive car recall. Toyoda's prepared remarks have already been released and the embattled CEO is expected to apologize to customers and to lawmakers ahead of his testimony.

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Studio 360

Glee Spreads to Japan

Friday, February 05, 2010

Fans of the Fox series "Glee" are known for their passion and enthusiasm.  Some "gleeks" are so dedicated to the show and its elaborately staged musical numbers that they perform their own versions of songs from the show and post them on YouTube.  Now perhaps the ...

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Studio 360

Love Virtually

Friday, January 08, 2010

A couple weeks ago, Kurt spoke with director James Cameron about his spectacular new movie Avatar.  He told Kurt that while the technology he used to craft the movie is important, at heart it's a love story: it's just that instead of boy meets girl, it's boy meets twelve-foot blue humanoid-cat... by posing as a virtual twelve-foot blue humanoid cat, himself.

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