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Japan

The Leonard Lopate Show

Underreported: Fukushima Update

Thursday, November 17, 2011

The crisis at the Fukushima reactor in Japan has been out of the headlines, but that doesn’t mean the crisis has been solved. We’ll speak with Dr. Edwin Lyman, a senior staff scientist in the Global Security program at the Union of Concerned Scientists

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The Takeaway

The Fukushima Exclusion Zone: Six Months Later

Tuesday, September 13, 2011

It's been six months since three reactors at the Fukushima nuclear plant over-heated following a tsunami, forcing 100,000 people living within a 12 mile radius of the site to evacuate. Today, the reactors are still not fully stabilized, but radiation levels in one area of what has come to be known as the "exclusion zone" have dropped. The BBC's David Shukman is one of the few journalists to venture inside the exclusion zone.

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The Leonard Lopate Show

"Hiroshima: Ground Zero 1945," at ICP

Thursday, July 28, 2011

Erin Barnett, ICP Assistant Curator of Collections, and Adam Harrison Levy, talk about the International Center of Photography’s “Hiroshima: Ground Zero 1945,” an exhibition of once-classified images of atomic destruction at Hiroshima, drawn from ICP’s permanent collection. This exhibition includes approximately 60 contact prints and photographs made for the 1947 United States Strategic Bombing Survey (USSBS) report on the effects of the nuclear bombing of Hiroshima, Japan, in 1945. “Hiroshima: Ground Zero 1945” is on view at ICP through August 28.

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The Takeaway

Japan's Road to a Cold Shut Down of Fukushima

Thursday, July 21, 2011

It’s been over four months since the earthquake and tsunami devastated Japan and crippled the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Station, which led to partial nuclear meltdowns in three of its reactors. Japan's government now says that those reactors are stable, and are headed toward a cold shutdown.

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Transportation Nation

A Sneak Peak At D.C. Metro's New Train Cars

Friday, July 08, 2011

(Washington D.C. - WAMU) In a few years, Metro is getting rid of a quarter of its old rail cars, the ones that crumpled like telescopes in the 2009 Red Line train crash and were deemed unsafe by federal investigators. And in their place will be a fleet of all new train cars.

Officials say their goal is to develop something sturdy and safe, but also something comfortable and inviting

"The design has a physical aspect, as well as a psychological aspect," says Masamichi Udagawa, an industrial designer Metro brought on to help design the aesthetics of the new cars.

He says the interiors will be a dark blue color, rather than the traditional orange and brown Metro riders are used to.

Udagawa says the reason for the change is that brown isn’t a very popular color.

"People really didn't like seeing the brown again," he laughs. "The color is a very subjective thing. It's very, very context-sensitive. So in the context of the D.C. system, people are a bit tired and maybe bored with brown."

The Kawasaki Company, based out of Japan, is building the train cars and could have them ready by 2013. But Metro says they might be delayed because of the recent earthquake and tsunami.

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The Leonard Lopate Show

Underreported: Ongoing Questions on Fukushima

Thursday, June 23, 2011

A number of scientists believe that the nuclear disaster at the Fukushima reactors in Japan is much worse than what governments are revealing. Al Jazeera reporter Dahr Jamail discusses what some in the scientific community are saying about the effects of the meltdown.

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Features

WNYC's Amy Eddings Interviews Actor Benicio Del Toro about the Films of Kaneto Shindo

Thursday, April 21, 2011

Eleven rare Japanese films directed by Kaneto Shindo will be screened in Brooklyn starting on Friday. BAM has organized the retrospective, along with actor and producer (and longtime Shindo fan) Benicio Del Toro. Click here to listen to the Del Toro interview.

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WNYC News

Most New York Eateries Confident in Japan Food Imports

Sunday, April 17, 2011

Food imports from Japan make up less than four percent of all U.S. food imports, according to radiation safety information on the FDA's website, but some in the food industry are still taking precautions even though the agency said "little or no products" are being imported from the tsunami battered region.

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WQXR News

Japan Nuclear Situation Upgraded to 7

Tuesday, April 12, 2011

Japan has raised the level of the disaster at its nuclear power plant to a 7. Although that's the same level as the Chernobyl disaster, according to The Associated Press Japanese officials say Fukushima has leaked a tenth of the radiation released at Chernobyl.

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WQXR Features

Plácido Domingo is Japan-Bound

Thursday, April 07, 2011

Plácido Domingo is sticking with his scheduled concerts this month in Tokyo, despite the recent disasters that have rocked Japan. It comes after some notable interruptions in his performance schedule.

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The Takeaway

Japan's Tragedy May Transform a Generation of New Workers

Friday, April 01, 2011

April 1st is the traditional "entrance day" for classes of new employees in Japan. It's a time when hundreds of thousands of recent college graduates would have just finished their first day at work, a day full of official ceremonies and welcome parties. However, as the country struggles to cope with multiple recent crises, Japan's newest workers face an uncertain future.

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The Takeaway

After the Quake: Aftershocks

Wednesday, March 30, 2011

We’ve heard the reports and told the stories of Japan, how it’s facing its worst crisis since World War II, about a death toll in the tens of thousands, the massive destruction of entire cities, and continuing threats of nuclear meltdown. Now, here’s more terrifying news: The threat of earthquakes hasn’t gone away — it has increased. Thomas Jordan is the Director of the Southern California Earthquake Center. And his work shows that Japan is under an increased threat for aftershocks. He appears in a new NOVA special "Japan's Killer Quake," which premiers tonight on PBS. Collum Macrae is one of the producers of the documentary.

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The Washington Report

Japan's Radioactive Water and Obama on Libya

Monday, March 28, 2011

NYT's David Sanger weighs in on President Obama's upcoming speech on U.S. military involvement in Libya and radioactive water at Japan's damaged nuclear plant.

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Soundcheck

Celebrity Charity Singles

Monday, March 28, 2011

U2, Justin Bieber and Katy Perry are among the megastars teaming up to benefit earthquake and tsunami relief efforts in Japan. But their compilation, “Songs for Japan,” will have a long road to match the success of early efforts like “We Are The World” and Live Aid. We look at why contemporary charity singles and albums tend to fall short. 

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Features

Fashion and Art for Japan Earthquake and Tsunami Relief

Monday, March 28, 2011

From well-known designers including Tory Birch and Anna Sui, to thousands of lesser-known artists at Web sites like cafepress.com, New Yorkers are creating products and donating portions of the profits to Japanese earthquake and tsunami relief.

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WQXR Features

Classical Musicians Open Pockets, but Cancel Performances, for Japan

Friday, March 25, 2011

As relief efforts for Japan continue, the classical music world has rallied to organize concerts and events in support of the disaster-rattled country. Here in New York, the Japan Society has shored up $2.1 million dollars to date.

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The Takeaway

Japan Nuclear Crisis: Two Weeks Later

Friday, March 25, 2011

It’s been two weeks since the earthquake and tsunami hit Northeastern Japan. Ever since that day, Japanese officials have been working tirelessly to avert a nuclear disaster. Friday morning, Japanese nuclear safety officials said that they suspect that the reactor core at one unit of the troubled Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant may have breached. That raises the possibility of more severe radioactive contamination to the environment. Henry Fountain, Science Reporter for The New York Times explains the latest.

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Transportation Nation

TN Moving Stories: Japan Trying to Get A Handle on Infrastructure Damage, LA Passes Sweeping Bus Service Cuts, and Boston Band Powers Concerts with Bikes

Friday, March 25, 2011

Nearly two weeks after the earthquake and tsunami struck Japan, engineers still do not know the full extent of damage to roads, bridges, rail lines and other infrastructure. (NY Times)

Meanwhile, Toyota is warning factories and dealers in North America that production delays are coming, while Nissan is looking for ways around its factory closures in Japan by flipping the supply chain around. (Marketplace)

The Los Angeles MTA approved sweeping bus service cuts, eliminating nine lines and reducing 11. Officials say they are still providing adequate service while making the bus system more efficient; critics say L.A.'s low-income residents will be hurt the most. (Los Angeles Times)

WNYC looks at the 2010 New York census map.

A Boston-based band uses bikes to power their concerts. "One person can sustain about 100 watts without breaking too much of a sweat. Five people can amass enough wattage to power a small live show." (WBUR)

City-funded parking garages at Yankees Stadium have become a "financial swamp for taxpayers," writes a NYDN columnist. "Ever since it opened...two years ago, the 9,000-space parking system has operated at barely 60% capacity, even on game days. Meanwhile, its operating expenses have run twice what was expected."

NJ Transit paid nearly $3.6 million for unused vacation and sick time last year -- even as it raised fares and cut service. Gov. Christie says the agency should go to a 'use it or lose it' policy. (Asbury Park Press)

The Bay Area's Metropolitan Transportation Commission made a $10 million commitment to a new $50 million revolving fund for loaning money to developers to build affordable housing near rail stations and bus stops. (San Jose Mercury News)

The Ohio Senate voted to pass a measure banning signs that tout federal stimulus spending along Ohio's roadways. (AP via BusinessWeek)

Top Transportation Nation stories we're following: As massive bus cuts loom, Long Islanders get emotional at a hearing. A NYC deputy mayor goes on the BL Show to defend the city's bike lane program -- and voice support for the city's transportation commissioner. And: after reports that a former DC Metro employee left the agency to become a lobbyist, the agency's board put the brakes on a contract.

Follow Transportation Nation on Twitter.

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The Takeaway

What Kind of Aid Does Japan Really Need?

Thursday, March 24, 2011

More than 600 nonprofits have offered relief goods and materials to the people of Japan since the earthquake and tsunami. But with the exception of twelve countries with specialized search and rescue teams and a handful of international aid organizations, the Japanese government is politely turning them down. The Japanese Red Cross Society has yet to appeal for funds. Still, just like after every major natural disaster, dozens if not hundreds of new nonprofits have been registered. In the case of a major world economy like Japan, where and how does it make sense to give? 

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The Takeaway

The Hidden Effects of Japan's Tsunami and Quake

Wednesday, March 23, 2011

The threat of nuclear disaster, the stories of missing loved ones, and the struggle to get relief to those stranded are all part of Japan's post-quake reality. As the country begins to recover, food supplies are threatened and questions loom over long term health effects of radiation in and around Fukushima prefecture. And now, the economic effects of the disaster are beginning to hit Tokyo and other parts of the country.

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