Streams

 

 

Japan

New Sounds

West Looks East: Japan

Friday, July 04, 2014

For this New Sounds program some Western musicians look to Japan for inspiration both melodic and instrumental. Hear selections from a recent release by cellist/composer Jordi Savall called "Hispania & Japan - Dialogues," created following the catastrophes in Japan in 2011.  It's actually based on a previous project from 2006, "The Route of the Orient," revolving around the Spanish Jesuit missionary St. Francis Xavier (Francisco Javier).

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The Takeaway

Obama Walks Tightrope Between Asian Allies

Thursday, April 24, 2014

President Obama is walking a tightrope—he must balance U.S. relationships with China, Japan, and South Korea as a huge trade deal hangs in the pendulum. Can the president keep his footing steady?

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World Weekly with Gideon Rachman

Obama’s state visit to Japan

Wednesday, April 23, 2014

Obama’s state visit to Japan

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The Takeaway

U.S. Tackles Tensions Between Japan & China

Wednesday, April 23, 2014

President Barack Obama lands in Tokyo today, the first stop on his week-long trip through Southeast Asia. At the top of his agenda are the rising tensions between Japan and China.

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The Takeaway

U.N. Top Court Rules Japan Must Stop Whale Hunts

Monday, March 31, 2014

The United Nations' top court—the International Court of Justice—has ruled that Japan must stop its whale hunts in the waters of the Antarctic. This is a battle that has been brewing between the Japanese and anti-whaling activists for decades.

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Freakonomics Radio

Why Are Japanese Homes Disposable?

Thursday, February 27, 2014

In most countries, houses get more valuable over time. In Japan, a new buyer will often bulldoze the home. We'll tell you why.

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On The Media

Behind the Scandal of "Japan's Beethoven"

Friday, February 14, 2014

This week Japanese Olympic figure skater, Daisuke Takahashi, found himself in the midst of national scandal, through no fault of his own. Takahashi skated his short program to a piece of music that had been initially attributed to Mamoru Samuragochi, known as "Japan's Beethoven," who was recently revealed to be neither a composer, nor possibly even deaf. Bob talks with Roland Kelts, author of JapanAmerica, about the revelations and the Japanese media's reaction to them.

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The Leonard Lopate Show

A Japanese War Crimes Suspect and an Unsolved Mystery from World War II

Thursday, February 13, 2014

In the wake of World War II, the Allied forces charged 28 Japanese men with crimes against humanity. Eric Jaffe tells the story of one of the accused, a civilian named Okawa Shumei. On the first day of the Tokyo trial, he made headlines around the world by slapping star defendant and wartime prime minister Tojo Hideki on the head. Had Okawa lost his sanity? Or was he faking madness to avoid a grim punishment? Jaffee tells the story in his book A Curious Madness

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The Leonard Lopate Show

Fukushima Update

Thursday, January 09, 2014

Al Jazeera America correspondent Michael Okwu examines Japan’s recovery three years after the disaster at the Fukushima Nuclear Power Plant. The final installment of Al Jazeera’s four-part series “Return to Fukushima” airs on America Tonight, at 9pm on Al Jazeera America.

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World Weekly with Gideon Rachman

China and Japan in the struggle of the century

Thursday, December 05, 2013

China and Japan in the struggle of the century

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The Takeaway

As the U.S. Pivots to Asia, China Reasserts Its Influence

Wednesday, December 04, 2013

As the U.S. attempts its "pivot" to Asia, a region of growing economic power with potential new markets for American products, Chinese authorities are pushing back, claiming a new air defense identification zone in international air space. Peter Dutton is a professor and director of the China Maritime Studies Institute at the U.S. Naval War College. He explains that China is pressuring its neighbors and U.S. economic allies. Also joining the program is Nancy Soderberg, former U.S. Ambassador to the United Nations, who examines American influence in the region.

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The Leonard Lopate Show

Japan 1941

Wednesday, December 04, 2013

Eri Hotta considers the attack on Pearl Harbor from the Japanese perspective and argues that when Japan launched hostilities against the United States in 1941, its leaders largely understood they were entering a war they were almost certain to lose. Her book Japan 1941: Countdown to Infamy poses an essential question: Why did these men—military men, civilian politicians, diplomats, the emperor—put their country and its citizens so unnecessarily in harm’s way? She draws on material little known to Western readers to find an answer.

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The Takeaway

Tensions Rise Between South Korea, China & Japan

Monday, December 02, 2013

Last week, China flexed its muscles by unexpectedly declaring an air defense identification zone in the East China Sea, which touches South Korea and Japan. Now tensions are rising between the nations amid this territorial dispute. Joining us today to discuss what this dispute actually signifies is James Fallows, a national correspondent for The Atlantic magazine who has reported on China extensively.

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The Washington Report

Obamacare Website Improves & Syrian Chemical Weapons Cleanup Offshore

Monday, December 02, 2013

Eddie Robinson talks with New York Times Chief Washington correspondent David Sanger about the new challenges facing President Barack Obama's healthcare website, the long-running dispute between China and Japan, and how the U.S. plans to destroy Syria's chemical weapons at sea.

The Takeaway

Building a Frozen Wall at the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Plant

Thursday, September 05, 2013

Earlier this week the Japanese government announced plans to spend $500 million on a new effort to build a frozen wall to stabilize the Fukishima Daiichi nuclear plant, the site of the worst nuclear accident since Chernobyl. Arjun Makhijani, an engineer specializing in nuclear fission and the president of the Institute for Energy and Environmental Research, explains how that frozen wall would work.

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Studio 360

Tokyo Old and New

Friday, August 30, 2013

What is essentially Japanese in design? One designer compares it to tofu. Architects Yoshiharu Tsukamoto and Shigeru Ban, designer Reiko Sudo, and poet Shuntaro Tanikawa show Kurt Andersen how Japan brings tradition and innovation together. His search takes him through the streets of old Tokyo ...

Slideshow: The Japanese Influence in Art and Design

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Studio 360

The Lion

Friday, August 30, 2013

Kurt stumbles into a temple for classical music fans, with scratchy records played at the altar.

Slideshow: Inside the Lion

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Studio 360

Studio 360 in Japan

Friday, August 30, 2013

Studio 360 is big in Japan. Kurt Andersen hits the streets of Tokyo in search of cutting-edge art and design. Female art stars take on the schoolgirl stereotype; young rebels scream against an economic system that failed them. And Kurt goes undercover at the epicenter of all things nerdy to ...

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Studio 360

This Is Their Youth

Friday, August 30, 2013

Young adults in Japan are unemployed, disenchanted, and depressed. Roland Kelts talks to poet Misumi Mizuki, novelist Ryu Murakami, and other artists to understand why. And he finds that Japan’s troubled youth might be changing the country for the better.

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Studio 360

Japanese Schoolgirls Grow Up

Friday, August 30, 2013

The Japanese schoolgirl image was made famous by comic books and cartoons. But not everyone thinks they’re so kawaii (cute). What do Japanese women make of this archetype? Lisa Katayama met three young art stars whose work reclaims and re-invents female pop imagery, in some disturbing ways ...

Slideshow: The Art of Toast Girl and Erina Matsui

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