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Islam

The Leonard Lopate Show

Mosques and the Protests in Egypt

Wednesday, February 09, 2011

Social media sites helped organize the protests in Egypt, but mosques have served many functions—from becoming makeshift hospitals to turning out large crowds of protesters each Friday. Fawaz Gerges, Professor of Middle Eastern Politics and International Relations at the London School of Economics, describes the many roles that mosques have played during the protests across the region, from Egypt to Yemen to Jordan.

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The Takeaway

Sowing the Seeds of Democracy in Islamic Countries

Tuesday, February 08, 2011

It’s been fifteen days since the protests in Egypt began and even longer since voices of dissent erupted in Tunisia. Across the Arab world, there have been unrelenting calls for democratic reform. However, some claim that Islam and democracy are too incompatible to function together. Can an Islamic state embrace democracy?

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The Takeaway

Coptic Christians Have High Hopes for New Egyptian Leadership

Friday, February 04, 2011

Copts are native Egyptian Christians who make up about 10 percent of the Egyptian population. Their history in the country is deep, and as a religious minority, Copts have experienced discrimination and sometimes persecution under Mubarak. However, amidst the current unrest, Copts fear that an unstable government might give way for to powers even more unkind to Christians.

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The Takeaway

Arab-Americans Reflect on Uprisings Back Home

Monday, January 31, 2011

As popular uprisings spread through the Middle East, challenging autocratic regimes and upending old social orders, The Takeaway speaks with three Arab Americans about the upheaval and its meaning for their friends and family.

 

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The Takeaway

Could Popular Uprising in Tunisia Spread to Other Arab States?

Monday, January 17, 2011

Tunisia's army clashed with armed gangs in Tunisia's capital on Sunday, two days after a popular uprising forced long-time dictator, President Zine El Abidine Ben Ali, to flee the country. Popular support for Tunisians’ freedom is echoing across the Arab world. Anthony Shadid, a foreign correspondent for The New York Times, has reported from most countries in the Middle East over his fifteen year career. He says that the Arab world is facing its most dangerous and yawning divide between ruler and ruled.

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WNYC News

Muslim Group Tries to Spread Peace on New Year's Eve

Thursday, December 30, 2010

Thousands of people will be descending on Times Square for New Year's Eve, and one group hopes it will be an opportunity to spread a message of peace. The Muslims for Peace Campaign, sponsored by the Ahmadiyya Muslim Community, is a nationwide campaign. It was launched following the failed Times Square bomb plot in May.

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WNYC News

Muslim Group Takes Message of Peace to Times Square

Saturday, December 18, 2010

There's a new message in Times Square. It's a scrolling, 15-second graphic that reads: 'Muslims for Love, Loyalty and Peace.' It also features pictures of a dove, an American flag and a peace sign. And it's in rotation on an electronic billboard on 42nd Street, between 7th and 8th avenues, from six o'clock in the morning to midnight now through January 17.

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The Takeaway

Oklahoma's Ban on Sharia Law in Courts Raises Questions, Fires up Supporters

Tuesday, November 23, 2010

Earlier this month, seventy percent of voters in Oklahoma said yes to a controversial amendment to the state's constitution, which bans the use of Sharia law in Oklahoma's courts. On Monday, a U.S. District Judge extended a ban on the Sharia amendment. In a state that has only very few Muslims – between 15,000 and 30,000 – why did so many Oklahomans feel that Sharia law was a threat? 

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The Takeaway

Preparing for the Hajj: More Than Packing Your Bags

Tuesday, November 16, 2010

Today marks the third and most important day of the Hajj, an annual Islamic pilgrimage that has drawn as many as three million Muslims to Mecca, Saudi Arabia. The four-day trip is arduous, packed with rituals and prayers. Most pilgrims begin planning for the trip up to six months in advance and set aside around $2,000 to make the journey. Some are encouraged to get in good physical shape, build their immune system, prepare a will, and go through counseling so they are mentally prepared.

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The Takeaway

How Environmentally Friendly is the Hajj?

Monday, November 15, 2010

Islam is in many ways an essentially green religion, with foremost ethical principles stressing the importance of protecting the Earth and living in harmony with nature. But the Hajj, which officially began yesterday, has in recent years been attracting negative attention for its environmentally unfriendly effects. What does it mean when one of Islam's holiest events leads to environmental damage?

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The Brian Lehrer Show

Islam and the Environment

Friday, November 12, 2010

Blogger, community leader, and The Takeaway contributor Ibrahim Abdul-Matin discusses his new book, Green Deen: What Islam Teaches about Protecting the Planet.

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Micropolis

President Bush on Park 51: No Comment

Wednesday, November 10, 2010

Former president George W. Bush was on the Today Show with Matt Lauer, promoting his new book, Decision Points, and he was pushed to take a stand on Park 51, the Islamic cultural center and mosque near Ground Zero. As you may recall, at the peak of the controversy this summer, a number of supporters of Park 51 called on him to speak up, in hopes that he would voice support for the project and perhaps chide the most virulently anti-Islamic speakers.

He didn't then, and he refused to today, saying he didn't want to have his words on the issue -- or any other issue -- constantly compared to those of President Obama. Lauer tried to elicit some response, any response on the issue, but didn't get very far.

LAUER: Well, without saying whether they should build the community center or not, are you disappointed by the increase in anti-Muslim rhetoric in this country that we’ve seen recently?

BUSH: I think most Americans welcome freedom of religion and honor religions. I truly do. And the problem with the arena today is a few loud voices can dominate the discussion and I don’t intend to be one of the voices in the discussion.

See this video clip of the interview, from Think Progress.

The full interview is also worth watching, if only to see Kanye West apologize for calling Bush a racist, once upon a time. I think we need to impose an immediate moratorium on Kanye West apologies.

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The Takeaway

Obama Speaks to Two Muslim Worlds from Indonesia

Wednesday, November 10, 2010

As a part of his 10-day tour in Asia, President Barack Obama delivered a very personal speech at the University of Indonesia Wednesday morning. Echoing some of themes he raised in his famous speech in Cairo in 2009, Obama spoke about the need for mutual respect among Muslims and the importance of a joint effort to combat extremism. Indonesia is home to the largest population of Muslims in the world, and Muslims in Southeast Asia tend to practice a more moderate form of Islam than those farther west. Did President Obama navigate those differences in his speech? 

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The Takeaway

President Obama Addresses World's Most Populous Muslim Nation

Tuesday, November 09, 2010

President Obama is poised to give his highest profile address to the Islamic world since his speech in Cairo a year ago. On Tuesday night, the president will speak in Jakarta, Indonesia, home to the world's most populist Muslim nation.

The president will speak before an estimated six thousand people at the University of Indonesia, where he is expected to hold up the country as a model for the values of democracy and diversity.

We're asking: if you're Muslim, what do you want to hear from President Obama tonight?

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Micropolis

Halloween: Do Muslims Celebrate?

Thursday, October 28, 2010

As a kid, my parents didn't have an issue with my going out on Halloween and trick-or-treating. They didn't even hassle us much about bringing home too much candy. Their main concern was probably the same one my sisters and I had: what if we bit into an apple with a razor blade into it?? That was the fear much of America seemed to have in my day -- as if kids of our generation actually had an iota of interest in healthy apples when presented with so many other, more decadent options.

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Features

Three Faiths: NY Public Library Exhibition Celebrates Shared Religious Traditions

Friday, October 22, 2010

"Three Faiths: Judaism, Christianity, Islam" opens on Friday at the New York Public Library with some of the library’s most rare and beautiful spiritual texts.

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The Takeaway

Workplace Discrimination against Muslim Americans on the Rise

Friday, September 24, 2010

In 2009, workplace discrimination against Muslims rose 20 percent to a record 803 claims, according to federal data cited in the New York Times.

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Features

Muslim Groups Use Video to Combat Islamophobia

Saturday, September 11, 2010

Saturday marks the ninth anniversary of 9/11/01. In New York, the day is always loaded, especially in the face of the continuing controversy around the Islamic cultural center proposed for near Ground Zero, and the fact that this year, the Islamic holiday Eid al-Fitr falls on 9/11.

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The Takeaway

Listeners Respond: 'Burn a Quran Day' Controversy

Friday, September 10, 2010

Takeaway listeners, like much of the world, have been captivated by the story of the Florida pastor who decided yesterday to call off his Quran burning.

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The Takeaway

Evangelical Minister: We Need More Moderate Voices

Friday, September 10, 2010

Pastor Terry Jones announced last night that he cancelled his plans to hold a Quran-burning in Gainesville, Fla. Instead, he will fly to New York to meet with Imam Feisal Abdul Rauf, who is proposing to build an Islamic Cultural Center and mosque near ground zero.

Yesterday we spoke with another evangelical Christian minister from Gainesville — Dan Johnson, minister at Trinity United Methodist Church in Lower Manhattan — who was opposed to the burning. He said, "I think this country is more eager now than ever to hear moderate voices, and they're tired of... being taken hostage by people on the fringes so much.”

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