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The Takeaway

Pakistan Bans Facebook, YouTube for Blasphemy

Monday, May 24, 2010

Pakistan has temporarily blocked access to Facebook and YouTube due to "blasphemy."

Here's the context: It started with South Park. The intentionally incendiary cartoon comedy came under criticism for making an image depicting Mohammed (an act offensive to many Muslims). Comedy Central ran the episode in question, but heavily censored it; among the protests from Muslims was one from a group named "Revolution Muslim." The group posted a lengthy response to the episode, including language bordering on death threats. So another cartoonist came to the defense of free speech, and made a joking proposition that there should be an "Everybody Draw Mohammed Day."

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On Being

Robert Wright — The Evolution of God [remix]

Thursday, March 04, 2010

Robert Wright charts an intellectual path beyond the faith versus reason debate. He takes a relentlessly logical look at the history of religion, exposing its contradictions. Yet Wright also traces something "revelatory" moving through human history. I

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On Being

[Unedited] Robert Wright with Krista Tippett

Thursday, March 04, 2010

Robert Wright charts an intellectual path beyond the faith versus reason debate. He takes a relentlessly logical look at the history of religion, exposing its contradictions. Yet Wright also traces something "revelatory" moving through human history. I

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On Being

Ed Husain — Reflections of a Former Islamist Extremist [remix]

Thursday, January 14, 2010

British activist Ed Husain was seduced, at the age of 16, by revolutionary Islamist ideals that flourished at the heart of educated British culture. Yet he later shrank back from radicalism after coming close to a murder and watching people he loved becom

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On Being

[Unedited] Ed Husain with Krista Tippett

Thursday, January 14, 2010

British activist Ed Husain was seduced, at the age of 16, by revolutionary Islamist ideals that flourished at the heart of educated British culture. Yet he later shrank back from radicalism after coming close to a murder and watching people he loved becom

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The Takeaway

Michigan Muslims Rally Against Terrorism

Friday, January 08, 2010

If you were with us Christmas week, you might have heard us talk to Majed Moughni, an attorney in Dearborn, Mich. Moughni has organized a rally later today for fellow Muslims to speak out against terrorism; he began organizing after the failed Christmas Day attack aboard a Detroit-bound jet.

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The Takeaway

War on Terror, War of Words

Monday, November 30, 2009

That our nation is becoming increasingly polarized over social, legal and civic debates is a popular story, and one well mined by the same media outlets who often drive partisan animosity. That polarization has manifested itself, for example, at town hall debates where members of the public declare mandated health care to be "fascist."

It's bad enough when disingenuous attacks muddy public debate at civic meetings, but what happens when our leaders themselves use language that misses the mark? We talk with Julie Rose, reporter for WFAE in Charlotte, N.C., about Rep. Sue Myrick (R-NC), who, in her personal quest to assist the War on Terror, may have gotten herself in a war of words.

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The Takeaway

Concerns Over H1N1 at the Hajj

Thursday, November 26, 2009

It's the second day of the Hajj, the yearly pilgrimage to Mecca, in Saudi Arabia. 2 million Muslims from around the world typically make the trip; this year Saudi Government officials are predicting a 40% drop in the number of local pilgrims to Mecca this year because of fear of H1N1. We speak to the BBC's Shahzeb Jillani, from the middle of the Hajj, about the fears, precautions and facts about the spread of the flu at this year's pilgrimage.

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The Takeaway

Alleged Fort Hood Shooter Reportedly Wrote to Radical Cleric

Tuesday, November 10, 2009

New details are emerging in the case of the suspected Fort Hood shooter, Maj. Nidal Malik Hasan, an Army psychiatrist who shot and killed 13 people and wounded 29 others during a shooting spree last week. Our partner The New York Times reports that Hasan had sent 10 to 20 messages since late last year to a radical Islamic cleric, once a leader at the Virginia mosque where Hasan worshipped and since relocated to Yemen. Scott Shane, New York Times national security reporter, joins us. And for a look at how the community in and around Fort Hood is reacting to the tragedy, we talk to Colonel Chaplain Frank Jackson. He is the garrison chaplain at Fort Hood.

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On Being

Karen Armstrong — Freelance Monotheism [remix]

Thursday, November 05, 2009

Karen Armstrong speaks about her progression from a disillusioned and damaged young nun into, in her words, a "freelance monotheist." She's a formidable thinker and scholar, but as a theologian she calls herself an amateur — noting that the Latin root of

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On Being

[Unedited] Karen Armstrong with Krista Tippett

Thursday, November 05, 2009

Karen Armstrong speaks about her progression from a disillusioned and damaged young nun into, in her words, a "freelance monotheist." She's a formidable thinker and scholar, but as a theologian she calls herself an amateur — noting that the Latin root of

Comment

On Being

Malka Haya Fenyvesi and Aziza Hasan — Curiosity Over Assumptions [remix]

Thursday, October 15, 2009

We shine a light on two young leaders of a new generation of grassroots Muslim-Jewish encounter in Los Angeles. They're innovating templates of practical relationship that work with reality, acknowledge questions and conflict, yet resolve not to be enemie

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On Being

[Unedited] Malka Haya Fenyvesi and Aziza Hasan with Krista Tippett

Thursday, October 15, 2009

We shine a light on two young leaders of a new generation of grassroots Muslim-Jewish encounter in Los Angeles. They're innovating templates of practical relationship that work with reality, acknowledge questions and conflict, yet resolve not to be enemie

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On Being

Living Islam [remix]

Thursday, September 24, 2009

Nine Muslims, in their own words, reveal a creative convergence of Islamic spirituality and American identity that is unfolding, largely unnoticed, in the United States. A lawyer turned playwright, a teacher who's a lesbian, a retired federal prosecutor —

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The Takeaway

Sudanese Laws in the Media Spotlight

Wednesday, July 29, 2009

A Sudanese reporter has been charged with wearing indecent clothing. What was she wearing to land her in court? Trousers. If convicted of the crime, she could be punished with 40 lashes. She has invited the world's media to witness her case and likely punishment. BBC Correspondent James Copnall was in the courtroom.

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Studio 360

Taqwacores

Friday, July 24, 2009

When Islamic convert Michael Muhammad Knight wrote a novel about Muslim-American punk rockers, The Taqwacores, he thought it was a fantasy. Turns out he was onto something. Soon he was the guest of honor at the first mosh pit in Pakistan. Produced ...

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The Takeaway

Weapons of Mass Instruction: The Madrassa Myth

Monday, June 08, 2009

With Pakistan’s public education in shambles, many families struggle to find decent schools for their children. One option is the local madrassa, or religious school. Some Westerners see these schools as incubators of Islamic extremists, or so-called “weapons of mass instruction.” Our next guest argues that the problem is not one of religious education but of law enforcement, and that U.S. money would be better spent on revamping the more globally-minded private school system. Christine Fair is a senior political scientist at the RAND corporation and an expert in Pakistan security issues. She co-wrote an article about madrassas in this month's Foreign Policy.

""We don't want to give the illusion that all madrassas are innocent, but we also want to say very clearly that they're a very small number. And of that small number, a smaller number yet are actually involved in the production of terrorism."
— Christine Fair of the RAND Corporation on Pakistani madrassas.

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The Takeaway

Did Obama Break New Ground in the Mideast Debate?

Thursday, June 04, 2009

We've been discussing President Obama's address to the Muslim world from Cairo University. The president touched on a wide range of issues. To hear more global perspectives on his efforts to improve U.S. relations in the Middle East, we are joined by Marcus Mabry, New York Times international business editor, Rami Khouri, editor-at-large of the Daily Star in Beirut, and Muna Shikaki, a correspondent for Al Arabiya.

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The Takeaway

Israel, Palestine and America's Role in Promoting Peace

Thursday, June 04, 2009

In President Obama's speech at Cairo University, he made it clear that U.S. and Israel have an "unbreakable" bond. He explained how the Holocaust continues to shape Israeli reactions to threats from the Arab world and to anti-Semitism around the world. But he also said it was undeniable that the Palestinian people – Muslims and Christians – have suffered in pursuit of a homeland. For reactions to this portion of the President's speech we turn to Ethan Bronner, Jerusalem Bureau Chief of the New York Times. We also have Professor Peter Awn, director of the Middle East studies program at Columbia University and Noah Feldman, professor of law at Harvard and author of The Fall and Rise of the Islamic State (Council on Foreign Relations).

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The Takeaway

Reactions to Obama's Call For A New Beginning

Thursday, June 04, 2009

Speaking at Cairo University, President Obama touched on issues including Iraq, women's rights, economic development, and religious tolerance. For more analysis on relations between America and the Muslim world, we turn to Professor Peter Awn, director of the Middle East studies program at Columbia University and Noah Feldman, professor of law at Harvard and author of The Fall and Rise of the Islamic State (Council on Foreign Relations).

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